Stick and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Stick Mass Market Paperback – July 30, 2002


See all 32 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
$7.59 $0.01

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The Bone Clocks
David Mitchell's hypnotic new novel crackles with invention and sheer storytelling pleasure. Learn more

Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: HarperTorch (July 30, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060085630
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060085636
  • Product Dimensions: 0.9 x 4.1 x 6.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (34 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,280,449 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

After serving time for armed robbery, Ernest “Stick” Stickley is back on the outside and trying to stay legit. But it's tough staying straight in a crooked town—and Miami is a pirate's paradise, where investment fat cats and lowlife drug dealers hold hands and dance. And when a crazed player chooses Stick at random to die for another man's sins, the struggling ex-con is left with no choice but to dive right back into the game. Stick knows a good thing when he sees it—and a golden opportunity to run a very profitable sweet-revenge scam seems much too tasty to pass up.

--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

Elmore Leonard has written more than three dozen books including Cuba Libre, Rum Punch, and Get Shorty, and numerous screenplays. He has an unparalleled reputation among lovers of mayhem, suspense, and just plain wonderful writing. A Grand Master Award winner of the Mystery Writers of America, he has been likened to everyone from Balzac to Dostoevsky to Dickens to Dashiell Hammett -- but he is, in fact, entirely and entertainingly sui generis.

He lives in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan.


More About the Author

Elmore Leonard wrote forty-five novels and nearly as many western and crime short stories across his highly successful career that spanned more than six decades. Some of his bestsellers include Road Dogs, Up in Honey's Room, The Hot Kid, Mr. Paradise, Tishomingo Blues, and the critically acclaimed collection of short stories Fire in the Hole. Many of his books have been made into movies, including Get Shorty, Out of Sight, and Rum Punch, which became Quentin Tarantino's Jackie Brown. Justified, the hit series from FX, is based on Leonard's character Raylan Givens, who appears in Riding the Rap, Pronto, Raylan and the short story "Fire in the Hole". He was a recipient of the National Book Foundation's Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters, the Lifetime Achievement Award from PEN USA, and the Grand Master Award of the Mystery Writers of America. He was known to many as the 'Dickens of Detroit' and was a long-time resident of the Detroit area.

Customer Reviews

Enjoyable, relaxation reading.
Guido
It is still the same book, but felt mislead.
David W. Shanton
Good book, kept my interest thru out.
John Winkler

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

29 of 30 people found the following review helpful By elvistcob@lvcm.com on July 31, 2002
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Usually in a Elmore Leonard book, we get to know what the caper is going to be rather early in the book. In "Stick", it doesn't come until very late in the book, and is so unimportant to the overall story it's almost a throw-in. But that doesn't matter, as just following the adventures of the title character is worth reading on it's own.
"Stick" tells the part of the life of it's main character, Earnest Stickley, right after being released from prison. Yes, he does witness a murder, and yes, people are after him for it, and yes, he does eventually get involved in a big score at the end, and yes, even this has a surprise twist. But it's what happens in between all this that I like.
You would think that seven years of hard time would make anyone sick of a life of crime. You would think he would avoid anything that would send him back to a life that he admits is a constant struggle for survival. But, as in his other books, a con is a con is a con. It's amusing that Stick doesn't even seem to conceive of the idea of a completely straight life, even though that's what he's declaring.
Sure, he gets a job as a chauffer, but it's just something to hold him as he scopes out other jobs. He claims to be coming to Florida to see his daughter, but it's quite a while into the story before he actually gets around to going to see her. Checking out the local crime scene is just a higher priority, yet you don't dislike the guy.
While this life is not for me, it does provide great escapism into a world where I can be part of it, but not have to pay the price.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
18 of 20 people found the following review helpful By John Kaderich on January 5, 2001
Format: Paperback
This is a hard, fast-paced, joyride of a book. Leonard doesn't write many bad books, but occasionally he seems to run out of ideas. Not this time, though. If you're looking for the perfect busride/planeride/trainride reading, something to keep you absorbed for hours, pick this baby up.
JK
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Karlos Marxus on January 9, 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is Elmore Leonard at his finest. It's all here. The spare, clean prose, the dead-on dialogue, and the tight, strong, driven plot shot through with the fatalistic humor of the street. If you have never read an Elmore Leonard book this should be your first. And if you're an old fan, this book will showcase everything that's drawn you to read his other books, and whet your appetite for even more.
Much of what Leonard writes now days is throwaway. It's entertaining, but it won't last. Stick is different. My fearless prediction: In another 50 years Stick will be considered a classic, in much the way Damon Runyon's work is today. If I'm wrong, look me up and I'll buy you lunch.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Christopher Loring Knowles on September 24, 2005
Format: Paperback
Some might say that if you've read one Elmore Leonard crime yarn, you've read them all. Maybe there is an element of truth to this- slightly addled but well-meaning guy with a checkered past meets smart, sexy dame and pull a convulted scam on rich ne'er-do-wells. That's the essential plot to a dozen Leonard tomes, right? Well, the pleasure of Leonard's work is in the telling, and in watching the chinese puzzles his characters concoct unfold. Stick is no different than Rum Punch or Tishimongo Blues or Pagan Babies or Get Shorty in this regard. But his prose is so crisp, his plots so breathless and his characters so charming that you are so entertained along the way, the template becomes invisible. In fact, since Leonard fans know where he is going to take us, the template allows us to bask in his endlessly clever inventions and his inimitable tone. No one straddles whimsy and menace like Leonard, and only Hiassen and McBain do Florida sleaze as well.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 28, 1998
Format: Paperback
After having read Elmore Leonard steadily since I discovered his name in a currently out-of-print collection of pulp stories, I've been a diehard fan. Stick is a chance for the Leonard fan aquainted with his later works-turned-movies (Get Shorty, Out of Sight, Maximum Bob) to watch the genisus of pure genius. The book has several twists that show up, in form, in some of Leonard's later novels, and Ernest Stickley, Jr. seems more like a blue collar worker than an ex-con trying to make a go at it. None of this subtracts from the novel's genuine story; the bad guys are anything but simple and two-dimensional, and the overall undercurrent throughout the book is one of anticipation. Much as I hate to say it, Tarantino has nothing on this kind of stuff.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Bill Slocum VINE VOICE on December 25, 2005
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Near the end of this 1983 novel, Ernest Stickley's prospective love interest tags him as "basically a straight-shooter, within your own frame of values," thus defining the protagonist of nearly every Leonard book I have read. There's a bit of the same-old formula here, which some may love more than me.

Of course, this isn't the first time Leonard has featured Stickley in a novel. He appeared a few years before in "Swag," as half of a robbery partnership. Now alone again, and out of prison, Stickley finds himself quickly on the wrong side of a Florida drug deal gone bad. Though wanted, Stickley wants something, too, the money he was promised for delivering the merchandise, and in a roundabout way that involves working as a chauffeur for a shady businessman, he sets about getting it.

"Swag" was a good book, with flashes of real brilliance. There you stayed for the ambiance and the dialogue but found yourself swept along by a plot that became more intricate and clever by the page. I think Leonard was after a similar effect here, only half succeeding. The central story involving the drug dealers grabs you, but then takes a back seat as Leonard puts Stickley and the reader inside a large estate along Biscayne Bay, where stock touting and mistress shuffling are S.O.P. under the shade of the acacia trees.

Leonard has a lot of fun introducing us to the goofy household where Stick lies low for a while. Colorful writing predominates as owner Barry Stam endlessly works the phones playing the market while trying to impress Stick with his street attitude, which Stick finds too forced by half. Stick finds Stam's wife and mistress more to his liking.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?