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65 of 67 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Greatest Artist of "Generation X": Tupac Shakur!
The worst aspect of Tupac Shakur's death was the uncontrollable inevitability of it all. Even if he hadn't been cruelly gunned down, anyone who was paying attention knew his story wouldn't have a happy ending. His public persona was so confused: a tempestuous mix of poet, thug, sensitive soul, and woman-chasing playa. The same elements that made his downfall so...
Published on February 25, 2000

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The Less Quality Material
More than three years after his death, it's difficult to believe there's still unreleased 2Pac material out there, much less quality material. After no less than three posthumous albums built around what 2Pac produced when he was still alive (plus an assortment of bootlegs making the rounds), the well apparently still hasn't run dry, and Still I Rise is the inevitable...
Published on February 26, 2004 by xklox


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65 of 67 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Greatest Artist of "Generation X": Tupac Shakur!, February 25, 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Still I Rise (Audio CD)
The worst aspect of Tupac Shakur's death was the uncontrollable inevitability of it all. Even if he hadn't been cruelly gunned down, anyone who was paying attention knew his story wouldn't have a happy ending. His public persona was so confused: a tempestuous mix of poet, thug, sensitive soul, and woman-chasing playa. The same elements that made his downfall so unavoidable are the ones that make it a no-brainer that he would continue to fascinate and sell records years after he took his residence in heaven's ghetto. STILL I RISE is 2Pac's fifth posthumous release.
For all his posing and posturing, 2Pac did possess a lifetime worth of talent, talent that was crammed into his brief time in the spotlight. Even what's left over at this late date has significant artistic merit. From "Letter to the President," an earnest, simple, and direct admonition to Bill Clinton to the simple, perfectly old-school "Homeboyz" (which harkens back to his DU days), the tracks on STILL I RISE showcase what 2Pac was--an intelligent, complex talent.
Really, Tupac scares me. Not because he's become the black Elvis-with Tupac sitings as common as those of the famed entertainer-but because he continues to be so good, even in his death. One of the phenomenal talents of the late 20th century, Tupac Shakur didn't know how to write a bad song. Drawing from a life filled with pain and more pain, Tupac laid down his rhymes with an honest heart, never fearing consequences. He wrote about his Mama when it wasn't cool to be soft, forever etching him in the hearts of women everywhere. The rap-ballad "Still I Rise" could be a sequel to "Dear Mama," as it reaches for clarity in a world gone mad. "Baby Don't Cry (Keep Ya Head Up II)" offers hope to youths who can't see their way out of the crime-prison-death cycle. "Even when the road is hard / Never give up," he preaches. The long-anticipated album unites him with his beloved Outlawz, what's left of them anyway. When Pac was alive, his Outlawz were his family-five teens he rolled with, boys he took care of when no one else cared. Shortly after Pac's death, the Outlaw-Yafeu Fula-was also murdered and the death goes on and on. Much of this record speaks to death, and it's not surprising. From the Golden Gate to the Apple State, the streets are filled with kids like Tupac, and even in his death, he's still giving them hope.
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42 of 45 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Don't own "Still I Rise"?? You're REALLY missing out, April 2, 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Still I Rise (Audio CD)
The worst aspect of Tupac Shakur's death was the uncontrollable inevitability of it all. Even if he hadn't been cruelly gunned down, anyone who was paying attention knew his story wouldn't have a happy ending. His public persona was so confused: a tempestuous mix of poet, thug, sensitive soul, and woman-chasing playa. The same elements that made his downfall so unavoidable are the ones that make it a no-brainer that he would continue to fascinate and sell records years after he took his residence in heaven's ghetto. STILL I RISE is 2Pac's fifth posthumous release. For all his posing and posturing, 2Pac did possess a lifetime worth of talent, talent that was crammed into his brief time in the spotlight. Even what's left over at this late date has significant artistic merit. From "Letter to the President," an earnest, simple, and direct admonition to Bill Clinton to the simple, perfectly old-school "Homeboyz" (which harkens back to his DU days), the tracks on STILL I RISE showcase what 2Pac was--an intelligent, complex talent.
Really, Tupac scares me. Not because he's become the black Elvis-with Tupac sitings as common as those of the famed entertainer-but because he continues to be so good, even in his death. One of the phenomenal talents of the late 20th century, Tupac Shakur didn't know how to write a bad song. Drawing from a life filled with pain and more pain, Tupac laid down his rhymes with an honest heart, never fearing consequences. He wrote about his Mama when it wasn't cool to be soft, forever etching him in the hearts of women everywhere. The rap-ballad "Still I Rise" could be a sequel to "Dear Mama," as it reaches for clarity in a world gone mad. "Baby Don't Cry (Keep Ya Head Up II)" offers hope to youths who can't see their way out of the crime-prison-death cycle. "Even when the road is hard / Never give up," he preaches. The long-anticipated album unites him with his beloved Outlawz, what's left of them anyway. When Pac was alive, his Outlawz were his family-five teens he rolled with, boys he took care of when no one else cared. Shortly after Pac's death, the Outlaw-Yafeu Fula-was also murdered and the death goes on and on. Much of this record speaks to death, and it's not surprising. From the Golden Gate to the Apple State, the streets are filled with kids like Tupac, and even in his death, he's still giving them hope.
BUY THIS CD... It's the greatest.
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28 of 29 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars ...FROM BEYOND?, December 20, 1999
By 
This review is from: Still I Rise (Audio CD)
THIS CD IS PROBALLY ONE OF THE BEST SO-CALLED POSTHUMUS RELEASES THAT I HAVE EVER HEARD. IF I DIDN'T KNOW ANY BETTER I WOULD SAY THAT PAC PUT THIS CD TOGETHER IN THE STUDIO A FEW MONTHS AGO. UNLIKE ANOTHER RECENT POSTHUMUS RELEASE EARLIER THIS MONTH, PAC'S SOUNDS NEW AND FRESH, NOT LIKE SOMETHING THAT WAS RECORDED IN '93 AND PASSED OFF AS CURRENT. CHECK OUT THE TITLE TRACK...IT IS EASILY NOT ONLY THE BEST ON THE CD BUT ONE OF THE BEST HIP-HOP TRACKS OF THE YEAR. TRUE HIP-HOP HEAD WILL WANT TO HAVE THIS NOT ONLY BECAUSE IT'S GOOD BUT IT WILL BE A CLASSIC....AN ODE TO A LEGEND.
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21 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Best of the Best, October 17, 2003
This review is from: Still I Rise (Audio CD)
The worst aspect of Tupac Shakur's death was the uncontrollable inevitability of it all. Even if he hadn't been cruelly gunned down, anyone who was paying attention knew his story wouldn't have a happy ending. His public persona was so confused: a tempestuous mix of poet, thug, sensitive soul, and woman-chasing playa. The same elements that made his downfall so unavoidable are the ones that make it a no-brainer that he would continue to fascinate and sell records years after he took his residence in heaven's ghetto. STILL I RISE is 2Pac's fifth posthumous release. For all his posing and posturing, 2Pac did possess a lifetime worth of talent, talent that was crammed into his brief time in the spotlight. Even what's left over at this late date has significant artistic merit. From "Letter to the President," an earnest, simple, and direct admonition to Bill Clinton to the simple, perfectly old-school "Homeboyz" (which harkens back to his DU days), the tracks on STILL I RISE showcase what 2Pac was--an intelligent, complex talent.
Really, Tupac scares me. Not because he's become the black Elvis-with Tupac sitings as common as those of the famed entertainer-but because he continues to be so good, even in his death. One of the phenomenal talents of the late 20th century, Tupac Shakur didn't know how to write a bad song. Drawing from a life filled with pain and more pain, Tupac laid down his rhymes with an honest heart, never fearing consequences. He wrote about his Mama when it wasn't cool to be soft, forever etching him in the hearts of women everywhere. The rap-ballad "Still I Rise" could be a sequel to "Dear Mama," as it reaches for clarity in a world gone mad. "Baby Don't Cry (Keep Ya Head Up II)" offers hope to youths who can't see their way out of the crime-prison-death cycle. "Even when the road is hard / Never give up," he preaches. The long-anticipated album unites him with his beloved Outlawz, what's left of them anyway. When Pac was alive, his Outlawz were his family-five teens he rolled with, boys he took care of when no one else cared. Shortly after Pac's death, the Outlaw-Yafeu Fula-was also murdered and the death goes on and on. Much of this record speaks to death, and it's not surprising. From the Golden Gate to the Apple State, the streets are filled with kids like Tupac, and even in his death, he's still giving them hope.
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21 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Greatest Artist of "Generation X": Tupac Shakur!, March 15, 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Still I Rise (Audio CD)
The worst aspect of Tupac Shakur's death was the uncontrollable inevitability of it all. Even if he hadn't been cruelly gunned down, anyone who was paying attention knew his story wouldn't have a happy ending. His public persona was so confused: a tempestuous mix of poet, thug, sensitive soul, and woman-chasing playa. The same elements that made his downfall so unavoidable are the ones that make it a no-brainer that he would continue to fascinate and sell records years after he took his residence in heaven's ghetto. STILL I RISE is 2Pac's fifth posthumous release. For all his posing and posturing, 2Pac did possess a lifetime worth of talent, talent that was crammed into his brief time in the spotlight. Even what's left over at this late date has significant artistic merit. From "Letter to the President," an earnest, simple, and direct admonition to Bill Clinton to the simple, perfectly old-school "Homeboyz" (which harkens back to his DU days), the tracks on STILL I RISE showcase what 2Pac was--an intelligent, complex talent.
Really, Tupac scares me. Not because he's become the black Elvis-with Tupac sitings as common as those of the famed entertainer-but because he continues to be so good, even in his death. One of the phenomenal talents of the late 20th century, Tupac Shakur didn't know how to write a bad song. Drawing from a life filled with pain and more pain, Tupac laid down his rhymes with an honest heart, never fearing consequences. He wrote about his Mama when it wasn't cool to be soft, forever etching him in the hearts of women everywhere. The rap-ballad "Still I Rise" could be a sequel to "Dear Mama," as it reaches for clarity in a world gone mad. "Baby Don't Cry (Keep Ya Head Up II)" offers hope to youths who can't see their way out of the crime-prison-death cycle. "Even when the road is hard / Never give up," he preaches. The long-anticipated album unites him with his beloved Outlawz, what's left of them anyway. When Pac was alive, his Outlawz were his family-five teens he rolled with, boys he took care of when no one else cared. Shortly after Pac's death, the Outlaw-Yafeu Fula-was also murdered and the death goes on and on. Much of this record speaks to death, and it's not surprising. From the Golden Gate to the Apple State, the streets are filled with kids like Tupac, and even in his death, he's still giving them hope.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Vintage Tupac! Best Since Me Against the World!, December 20, 1999
By 
Drew (Bay Area, CA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Still I Rise (Audio CD)
In his 3rd posthumous release, 2pac returns with his meaningful album since Me Against the World. Where All Eyez on Me, Makaveli + 7 Day Theory, and R U Still Down lacked dimension, Still I Rise is a complete album. "Baby Don't Cry" and "Good Die Young" show yet again 2pac's softer side: "Baby please don't cry/ya got to keep ya head up/even when the road is hard/never give up... baby please don't cry/cause they win when your soul dies" "Letter to The President" and "Tear Drops and Closed Caskets" are social commentaries, showing 2pac's political side. And, of course, the thug shows through with a vengeance in Hell 4 a Hustler and Homeboyz. Although some of the songs have been bootlegged the beats on the album are redone and vocals have been added. The CD is the best since All Eyez On Me, and much better than R U Still Down. Still I Rise adds back in the missing element from All Eyez on Me, etc, by including the positive songs once again. 2pac before Death Row was a much better artist than afterward, and most of these songs were recorded on 2pac's last album with interscope, Me Against the World. If you buy one rap album this Christmas, make it this one. Forget Born Again, X, Life and Times of Shawn Carter Vol 3, this is the CD all your friends are going to bumping!
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Tupac / Outlawz "Rise" To The Occasion on "Still I Rise", December 22, 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Still I Rise (Audio CD)
"Still I Rise" is easily the most complete 2pac album since 1995's, "Me Against The World". Unlike his Death Row recordings, on "Still I Rise", Pac focuses more on the music itself, while putting more thought into the lyrics, instead of simply lashing out on rival NY rappers. "Still I Rise" is arguably tighter than 1996's 9x platinum, "All Eyez On Me". Where "All Eyez.." was harsh and rough around the edges with little sentimental value, "Still I Rise" is a smooth, better put together recording, and perhaps the most emotional Tupac work to date. "Baby Don't Cry (Keep Ya Head Up II)", the sequel to the 1993 hit, focuses on saving women from harmful relationships, while "The Good Die Young" is an emotional insight into the mind, heart, soul, and beliefs of the fallen rap star. Despite the added thought, feeling, and emotion to this album, 2pac's rage still burns as his voice goes hoarse on "Hell 4 A Hustler". Tupac also adds his political views on "Letter To The President" the albums though provoking opening track, and "Tear Drops and Closed Caskets" a more in depth look at ghetto life. The album is tight from beginning to end. It would have been nice to hear more of Tupac on the album, but the Outlawz are equally respectable in their role. "Still I Rise" is out to prove that indeed, Tupac is not dead.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars STILL I RISE-2PAC, December 29, 1999
This review is from: Still I Rise (Audio CD)
EVEN IN THE NEW MILLENIUM 2PAC'S "STILL I RISE" IS A FURTHER EXAMPLE WHY HE IS THE GREATEST RAPPER OF ALL TIME. JUST WHEN PEOPLE BEGAN CALLING DMX AND JA-RULE NEW 2PAC'S, THIS ALBUM IS A VIVID DISPLAY OF WHY THEY DON'T EVEN COME CLOSE. THE LIVE INSTRUMENTS COUPLED WITH THE RAW VOCALS OF 2PAC AND THE OUTLAWS MAKE THIS CD AN INSTANT CLASSIC.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Pac after Death, December 23, 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Still I Rise (Audio CD)
This is the best 2PAc cd to come out yet. He shows so much emotion and heart and the lyrics are deep and yet typical of 2pac. I wouldn't expect anything less from him. You can tell some of the Outlawz don't share pac's emotion but on songs when they come to gether like "Teardrops and Closed Caskets" the outcome is unbelievable. I have heard most of the rest of his unreleased tunes, and I can honestly say the best is yet to come.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 2Pac may be dead, but his spirit and his music live on!, February 5, 2000
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Still I Rise (Audio CD)
On each album 2Pac proves again and again that he's the greatest rapper ever born. A creative genius, a poet... So veratile. He can go from gangsta harcore rap to social consious issues. And you get it all on this album too. The production is straight West Coast and is just excellent. QDIII, 2Pac, Johnny J, Darryl Big D Harper, Kurupt, Daz and others did a hell of a job behind the boards. The only thing that bothers me on the album is the Outlawz. See, except for E.D.I. they all aren't that talented and most of the times I don't like there verses. But still, it takes just a bit from the album, since 2Pac is the one dominating. He has the longest verse on each song (or sometimes 2 verses) and he also does the hooks and the talking. You feel 2Pac all over the album. There're some really remarkable tracks on the album and they're too many so I won't talk about which ones they are. It's just all of them. Tupac Shakur, a true soulja, just rips it up all over this album and you can feel the heart and emotion he puts in each song. It's just something unique to him, and although so many wanna-bees try to bite his style (Master P, DMX, Tha Realest, C-Murder... should I go on?...) he's the only one, the true playa... The realest one, the one and only. I'd like to thank you, Pac, for another masterpiece. Rest in peace, soulja.
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