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Still Talking Hardcover – November 5, 1991


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 293 pages
  • Publisher: Random House, Inc.; 1st edition (November 5, 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0394579917
  • ISBN-13: 978-0394579917
  • Product Dimensions: 1.2 x 6.5 x 9.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #306,754 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
86%
4 star
5%
3 star
10%
2 star
0%
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See all 21 customer reviews
This is a easy book to read.
J. Swift
The book isn't perfect--the biggest flaw is that the central story to the book gets passed over in just a few paragraphs.
Mediaman
I have 4 books I am reading at this time..and put them away to read this book.
Rhonda Breuer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By jon sieruga on July 22, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Picking up right where her previous book "Enter Talking" left off, pioneering female comic Joan Rivers is matched up with producer Edgar Rosenberg via her "Tonight Show" connections, and soon found herself married. The book not only examines the show-biz ramifications of this loving marriage/business partnership in the entertainment world, it also shows how two 'outcasts' (by Joan's definition) came to cling to one another--and blame eachother when plans and dreams fell through. Some of the minute details (such as how many times Rivers guested on Johnny Carson's show) are sketchy, but Rivers' anger over being wronged so many times by people she trusted is instantly identifable. It's also a show-biz tome of wonderful gossipy bits: Tony Bennett constantly turning up late for a Vegas gig; Shirley MacLaine throwing her weight around (well, she is a Taurus!); Elvis Costello nodding off on camera; Cher being a good pal, always there when needed. Often, Rivers drops name for no other purpose than to fill certain gaps (she keeps mentioning Bill Cosby, Ann-Margret and Woody Allen without explaining these relationships to us--were they personal, friendly, or professional only?). The book's prologue and middle section details Edgar's suicide and Rivers' numbing heartache, yet Joan is careful not to overload her prose with repetitious grief--she's remarkably poised with her pen, sharp and brittle but also a woman in need. In fact, she's far more womanly and human here than her stand-up act ever let on, and many of her stories (triumphs and tragedies) are gripping, emotional, moving, bitterly funny and vividly told. B+
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Charles - Music Lover on September 14, 2008
Format: Hardcover
When I opened this book two days ago, I did not expect what I found. This is an impressive and engaging memoir about Joan Rivers' life and career. It centers around her husband's (Edgar Rosenberg) suicide and how that experience shattered her and her daughter. The book is essential reading for those whose lives have been impacted by a loved one's suicide. Rivers spares no punches in describing what lead up to, and the aftermath, of her husband's death.

What could easily have been a heavy and morbid subject instead was handled gracefully, with candor and honesty. I think that the reviewers who concentrated on Rivers' comedy style instead of the overall subject matter really missed the point on this one.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Bob Waskiewicz on December 10, 2000
Format: Paperback
This book is great.It gives you a inside look into the rise and fall of Joan River's career,and how she got herself back together again after being fired from Fox, and her husband Edgar,ending his life,while she was getting plastic surgery.Its also great to read about the different Stars.Joan talks about the late Michael Landon,and how mean he was to her while she was sitting in for Johnny Carson,and her on going fight with Victoria Principal.There's alot of funny jokes,especially the Liz Taylor one's.I think Joan was the main reason Liz got herself together in the 80's,and looked better than ever.Joan also talks about her childhood,and her rise to fame. If you like Joan Rivers humor,you will enjoy "Still Talking."
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Format: Hardcover
Why did I wait so long to read this book? It's amazing. Very well written, filled with detailed behind-the-scenes information on television, and a much more serious book than one would expect from Rivers. It's not a comedy book by any means--instead it's a serious memoir of her life with her late husband and the disastrous Fox late night TV show.

She throws a lot of people under the bus, naming names of those who are Hollywood insiders. Barry Diller comes across the worst, and it's ironic that now he is pretty much a washed-up has-been while Rivers is flourishing. Johnny Carson's lawyer (who released his own book recently that gives a very different story) comes across as a mafia hit man. Even Ben Stein, who I had always had respect for, gets hit for making up a fake story that got published about Rivers at her husband's funeral--she threatens to sue and he threatens to make up even more stuff if she does! The whole thing makes you wonder why anyone would want to work with Hollywood people--they're all selfish crazy liars that think nothing of breaking contracts and threatening lawsuits.

There are also some very serious sections of the book where she pours her heart out. I had to sit back and contemplate some of the insights she gave regarding life, death, marriage, family, and God. She is a deep, introspective person who accepts much of the blame for what has happened to her.

The book isn't perfect--the biggest flaw is that the central story to the book gets passed over in just a few paragraphs. Yes, the book is really about her husband's suicide (which is very detailed) but the key moment in the suicide story is when Fox's Barry Diller fires her husband from her late night show and she has to make the choice between leaving with him or continuing the show.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By cdmbooks on October 19, 2014
Format: Hardcover
Reading this book actually gives you a visual of why Edgar Rosenberg committed suicide. Joan Rivers was very patient with a man who pretty much gave her the financial backing she needed in the beginning before becoming a huge star; but later Edgar who was an intellect, who initially hired Joan as a comic writer - fell in love deeply with Joan during a time he was head of the household. Edgar did everything for Joan; but, when the controls were obviously passed along to Joan, each day a little bit of Edgar left. A shy man he was old fashioned and believed a man should take care of a woman. Hollywood brass eventually elevated Joan's star to the top as Edgar continued to wane and sink into obscurity. Joan does not really say so, but you see this happening little by little in this excellent book. Joan is booked everywhere and Edgar is house husband. Joan tries feverishly to feed Edgar's need to be in control; but the powers that be continually shoved Edgar into oblivion to the point that Edgar began to feel his life was not worth living anymore. He felt that Joan had gotten her wings. He helped her, but emasculation ruined Joan's husband. It was not intentional, and the only great thing about it was Edgar was glad to see Joan fly; but, his career was long over. Hollywood had changed. Joan had changed. She married Edgar for the support he gave her; and, in actuality Joan didn't need Edgar anymore. They separated. It was very easy to see why Edgar committed suicide. This is an excellent read. Joan Rivers is a genius. She is loyal. But, in the end - Joan regretted not being able to restore Edgar back to the self-sufficient, intellect he was when she first met him.
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