Qty:1
  • List Price: $22.00
  • Save: $5.36 (24%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 12 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Good | Details
Sold by Dalociont
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Spine is slightly rolled. No writing or highlighting but outside of book has some markings. cover has some shelf wear.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Stocking Up: The Third Edition of America's Classic Preserving Guide Paperback – June 15, 1990


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$16.64
$8.98 $0.89


Frequently Bought Together

Stocking Up: The Third Edition of America's Classic Preserving Guide + Putting Food By: Fifth Edition + Ball Complete Book of Home Preserving
Price for all three: $41.26

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 640 pages
  • Publisher: Touchstone; Rev Upd edition (June 15, 1990)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0671693956
  • ISBN-13: 978-0671693954
  • Product Dimensions: 7.2 x 1.3 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (33 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #176,396 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Choosing Vegetable and Fruit Varieties

As you page through any seed catalog, you'll discover that each vegetable and fruit is usually available in a number of varieties. Some may be particularly good for freezing; others maintain their quality best when canned. Certain varieties dry better than others, and some hold their flavor and texture well in underground storage. If you're planning to preserve a good part of your harvest, you'd do well to decide how you will be storing your garden surplus before you order your seeds, and then choose those fruit and vegetable varieties accordingly.

We've made that process a little easier for you here, by listing in the charts that follow those vegetables and fruits that are generally recognized as being best for freezing; canning; drying; pickling; juicing; turning into a sauce; making jam, jelly, and preserves; and keeping in some kind of cold storage, be it in a root cellar, basement, or outdoor storage area (noted here as "good keeper").

After each variety you'll find the name of seed companies that sell that variety. If your favorite seed company is not listed, forgive us. It does not necessarily mean that the company doesn't carry the variety in question; it merely means that we have only noted the larger and more popular seed companies that we are most familiar with. We know that some small companies sell some of the same varieties, and we also know that they may offer other varieties just as good for particular storage methods.

This is the third edition of Stocking Up, and the third time that we have extensively revised these charts. Each time we went back to the seed catalogs we were amazed at how much had changed since the last time, which only goes to show that the seed business is far from a static one. New varieties and hybrids are being developed all the time, so keep a lookout for varieties too new to make this present chart.

Copyright © 1986 by Rodale Press, Inc.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

I had a hardcopy of this book long ago and gave it to a family member.
Knblack
It isn't the be all and end all of canning but if you want a great book with many forms of preserving food this is the one for you.
Erin
It tells when to harvest as well as how best to preserve the produce from my garden.
Lynda J. Haas

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

44 of 45 people found the following review helpful By Heather Degeorge on November 13, 2003
Format: Paperback
This book covers canning, freezing, juicing, drying, cold storage/root cellaring as well as making and preserving your own dairy products. It provides a lot of helpful illustrations and many alternative methods of getting the job done given the equipment available (or not available) to you. In fact, this is the first time I've seen directions on making ice cream without a fancy maker!
This is actually the first book that made me think I could actually make my own cottage cheese or fruit flour.
They also walk the produce-newbie through choosing good produce and the differences in varieties; but for us suburban gardeners, they also help us find varieties good for preserving (including actual company names) and tips on harvesting at a good time.
The meat chart was priceless. I don't intend to purchase an animal to be butchered (although there are yields and advice given for this) but I found knowing what type of meat cut came from where was incredibly helpful in buying my meat in the grocery store! I also found the section on cutting up a chicken into pieces very valuable as well--since I can find whole chickens very easy. Likewise with instructions on filleting a fish. Knowing how to do this allows me to save money when purchasing! They then, of course, show you how to preserve them... and other seafoods and meats.
Last, they also cover nuts, grains, seeds and sprouts--getting/harvesting, preserving and recipes for using them.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
40 of 41 people found the following review helpful By John Michael Lerma on June 21, 2000
Format: Paperback
I wanted to begin putting up food like my grandparents but didn't have the background or knowledge. After reading this book, I feel like the expert. Extremely easy to understand and very useful. From storing garden vegetables in the Fall to putting up pickles, making raspberry jam, canning tomatoes, this book is excellent. Expert safety advice, how-to instructions, recipes, diagrams, etc. This is the only book you should need to begin putting up your garden produce. This really is the canner's bible!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
26 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Mom de Plume on July 27, 2001
Format: Paperback
It's a little disconcerting that we need a book to teach us what our Grandmothers new instinctively or by shared knowledge. But, in our whirlwind world of prepared food and fast food, even the most basic preservation techniques can seem like a foreign language.
If you only use one tenth of the valuable information in this book to prepare your own organic dishes, your life will be made that much more whole and healthy. This is a complete guide full of know how that will get your do it yourself juices flowing.  The four main headings are:
Vegetables and Fruits make up the first chapter which covers everything from picking the best variety of tomato(or any other fruit or vegetable) to grow for freezing or drying, to how to dry, freeze, pickle, can, or juice that tomato. It also teaches you how to turn your tomatoes (or other veggies) into relish, jelly and more. The recipes in this chapter have been created with the freezer in mind, but they are so good, they may not make it that far.
Dairy Foods ,the focus of the next chapter, churns up all the facts on milk, cream, eggs, butter, cheese, ice cream and even yogurt. I like the 'what can go wrong sections'; they must have anticipated I would read this book.
Meats, Poultry and Fish make up the third chapter. Here we learn how to freeze combination dishes (so they aren't little blocks of ice when we go to cook them later), as well as, the proper way to dry and can these staples.
Nuts, Seeds, Grains and Sprouts is one of my favorite sections. Making fresh herb and nut breads and spreading them with nut or herb butters makes me head for the kitchen.
This book was revised in 1990 and it may differ slightly from the information above. You see I have been using the book since 1978 when it first came out. Some information is timeless.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By apoem TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on December 5, 2006
Format: Paperback
I enjoy canning and preserving and saving food for later. This book enables me to do all of that safely. There are recipes for using what you have put up so you don't wonder how to use the ten jars of pickles you have made (for example). This is a useful book. Now when I luck into a great sale on fruits or veggies or we have a bumper crop in our garden I can figure out what to do with it.

Enjoy.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By MCE on September 6, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Stocking Up was recommended to me as "The Bible" for canning - both water bath and pressure canning. I was warned though that the recipes weren't so good. Well, I found that to be true. While the info in the time-tables and details on specific foods is great, the recipes had me scratching my head. Perfect example: Seckel Pears. The recipe calls for 8 lbs of pears which is supposed to fill 8 pints. Well, my 8 lbs of seckel pears filled 5 quarts because if I had used pint jars, I was only able to get three or four pears in each. Also, it called for only 6 cups of red wine vinegar, but by the time I finished canning everything, I had to use 11 cups of red wine vinegar (and part of that was apple cider vinegar because I ran out) in order to fill the quart jars before processing in the water bath. I now know to double-check with other books I have. The flavor of the recipes may be good, but their quantities are messed up. Still glad I purchased the book because it is a great reference for how to/how long to process specific things.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?