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Stolen Child Mass Market Paperback – January 2, 2010


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 154 pages
  • Publisher: Scholastic Canada (January 2, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0545986125
  • ISBN-13: 978-0545986120
  • Product Dimensions: 7.7 x 5 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,579,809 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

MARSHA SKRYPUCH is the author of the Dear Canada book, Prisoners in the Promised Land, as well as Aram's Choice, Hope's War, Nobody's Child, and Daughters of War. Her picture books include Silver Threads, Enough, and The Best Gifts. In 2009, Marsha was awarded the Order of Princess Olha by the Ukrainian President, in recognition of her story, Enough, which delved into the great Ukrainian famine that claimed millions of lives in the 1930s. The author lives in Brantford, Ontario.

More About the Author

Marsha Skrypuch is the author of many books for children and young adults. She has written more novels about the Armenian genocide than any other author in the English speaking world, yet she is not Armenian. "I write about people who must give up everything that is dear to them and travel to a new country. To me, these people are heroic."

Marsha tricked her teachers into thinking she knew how to read until it all caught up with her in grade 4 when she failed the provincial reading exam. Adding insult to injury, they made her repeat the year. As the tallest and oldest kid in the class, she didn't want to be seen learning to read with little skinny books and she was too proud to ask for help, so she taught herself how to read by taking out the fattest book in the children's section of the Brantford Public Library -- Oliver Twist. She kept on renewing it for a whole year. Reading that book was a turning point in her life. She decided that she loved reading, and wanted to write too.

Marsha loves speaking with students of all ages, especially those who are struggling academically or who feel "different".

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Nicola Mansfield on March 7, 2010
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Reason for Reading: I enjoy historical fiction about WWII, especial from a child's point of view.

Comments: This is an extremely compelling story about a subject which I know very little about: The Lebensborn Program. I knew such things were done but haven't really read anything about it before. The story is of Nadia, who moves to Canada with a Ukranian man and woman who are not her parents after World War II. She must call them Mother and Father, though she knows they are not, but they are kind and loving. Nadia is in somewhat of a state of shock and really doesn't remember any of her past but this book is a slow unraveling of her past as she starts to have flashes of memories from her past that are haunting and confusing, making her question whether she is a Nazi. Her new "parents" assure her she is not and encourage her to keep on remembering, which she does. At the same time, Nadia must also deal with fitting into her new country and its customs which, unfortunately, a couple of children at school make very difficult.

This is a bittersweet story that brings to life an aspect of the Nazi regime that is perhaps not so well known. While not as physically horrifying as other acts the Nazis perpetrated , it is an awful "experiment" that tore families apart, and ruined the lives of hundreds of thousands of children. The book is a compelling read, and coupled with its shortness is a fast read. The book's brevity does not however affect the power of emotion contained within its pages nor the development of Nadia's character. The reader connects with Nadia as a person and feels great anguish with her as she also learns who she is and what has happened to her.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Arthur Slade on August 26, 2011
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Skrypuch's Stolen Child brings to life a part of World War 2 that I knew nothing about. Her research is sound and, more importantly, so are her storytelling skills. One can only imagine the heartbreak of being raised by Nazis instead of your natural family. Actually, you don't have to imagine it. Just read this book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Christine Kohler on May 16, 2014
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Nadia is a recent immigrant to Canada from a WWII refugee camp in Europe. Only she has to keep secret that the people who brought her are not really her parents. Worse, Nadia has lost her memory as to who she is and where she is from and who her real family is.

Author Marsh Skrypuch has done an excellent job writing STOLEN CHILD as a mystery as Nadia slowly regains her memory. The distance in time--5 years after the war ended--and place--Canada rather than Europe--makes this MG novel not as intense for sensitive young readers.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
This gives a fiction viewpoint on what happens to some of the Jewish kids that were removed from there homes and given to the Germans to raise. I thought it was very historically accurate and tells what a child might be going through after the war.
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