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Stone Dogs (Draka #3) Mass Market Paperback – July 1, 1990


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 522 pages
  • Publisher: Baen (July 1, 1990)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0671720090
  • ISBN-13: 978-0671720094
  • Product Dimensions: 6.8 x 4.2 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,192,657 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

I'm a writer by trade, born in France but Canadian by origin and American by naturalization, living in New Mexico at present. My hobbies are mostly related to the craft -- I love history, anthropology and archaeology, and am interested in the sciences. The martial arts are my main physical hobby.

Customer Reviews

It is believable, the way a carefully explained chess match is believable.
Indra Sunrise Geerts
Although it's very heart-stopping and the Alliance (Americans and it's allies) loses, it really doesn't end.
Eric Harkness
The good guys are not always good, and in the end, it is questionable if they win.
jls@wts.net

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Indra Sunrise Geerts on November 22, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Any book exists upon two levels: the story, and the stories within. Where this book shines for its plot, its slow, careful setup, it's rich world, in short - it's story, it is truely the glimpses into the lives of the characters - the stories within - that cause this work to stick in your mind, years after reading it.
On the surface, this is an alternate-future fiction that any player of Diplomacy would be proud of. A nation of slaveholders, the Domination of the Draka, is founded in southern Africa. Because they are hated by their primitive neighbors, they are forced to expand and become more warlike. When World War I breaks out, they already own all of Africa. By their existance, they create a second front for the Ottoman Empire. Because the Turks fight a two front war, they are smashed, and assimilated. When WWII comes around, Russia now has a potent adversary on their southern border, and are unable to protect against Germany, or threaten Japan. As a result, the Germans pound the Soviets, the Japanese rule the Pacific, landing on the US west coast. After Russia falls, the Draka are able to press into the overextended Germans, pushing them back, and back again. Each step in this history derives from the previous step, clearly, simply.
So the history works. It is believable, the way a carefully explained chess match is believable. Each move makes sense.
This story takes place at the end of this history. The world is now divided into the Alliance for Democracy (the Americas, Japan, some parts of the far east, england) and the Domination of the Draka (Africa, Europe, almost all of Asia - in short, the other 3/5 of the world), and the two sides hate, fear, and totally fail to understand each other.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 22, 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is the final book in Stirling's original Draka trilogy. (If you haven't read both Marching through Georgia and Under the Yoke, read them first, or at least read Under the Yoke). I dicussed the background for the Draka trilogy in my review of Under the Yoke - see it for my overall discussion of the series. This review will focus mainly on The Stone Dogs.
In many ways, the Stone Dogs is a much weaker book than Under the Yoke. Whereas Under the Yoke is a brillianly rendered dystopia, the Stone Dogs is more action/adventure/science fiction. I didn't find the characters in the Stone Dogs particularly compelling, and I didn't think Stirling focused as much on the fascinating background as I might have liked. While he certainly did a good job of weaving the history of this alternative timeline with the characters, there was too much emphasis on spying activities. Also, Yolande Ingolfsson is not a particularly compelling main character; she's a monster, in a way that the Draka in previous books were not (compare her to Eric Von Shrakenburg). Also, the scientific advances in this book were ludicrous; both the Alliance (the Americans and other good guys) and the Draka manage to colonize the Solar System in a matter of decades, in a way that turns the Draka universe into space opera. It's a pretty good adventure story, but probably no better than most other space operas.
WARNING!! THE NEXT PARARGRAPH CONTAINS MAJOR SPOILERS FOR THE BOOK, INCLUDING THE ENDING! DO NOT READ UNLESS YOU HAVE ALREADY READ THE BOOK OR DO NOT CARE!
What ultimately makes the Stone Dogs so memorable, however, is the ending where - to put it bluntly - the Draka wins a complete and total victory over the Alliance (America), destroying the Alliance utterly in a thermonuclear holocaust.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 13, 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
In his gripping conclusion to the "Domination of the Draka" trilogy Stirling takes the conflict between Alliance and Democracy developed in the second book to new levels. The two opposing systems race to colonize space, research computer viruses and vicious biological plagues in preparation for the final apocalyptic war. In between, the secret service agents of the Alliance and the Draka aristocrat Yolande Ingolfsson, a main character of such depth as rarely encountered. The background as well is developed to such a degree that you have no problems immersing yourself in this strange world of theirs. And Stirling is not afraid to actually let the Final War happen - For the Draka, it never was a question anyway. Those last chapters have been someof the most riveting I have ever read. Buy it !
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Fredric Smoler on March 8, 1998
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Urgent: this is the conclusion to the first Draka trilogy, and must be read last. These books--the first is Marching Through Georgia, the second Under The Yoke--are the most compelling and disturbing alternate history I have ever read, and most people have the same response to them. Although the Draka books are already the subject of thousands of Net messages and debates on various lists, they deserve to be far more widely known. Stirling's alternate history branches in the 1770s, with defeated American Loyalists founding a Cape Colony(Drakia, after Francis Drake) and subsequently reinforced by defeated French Royalists and American Confederates, plus the likes of Carlyle, Gobineau, de Maistre, etc., and founding a kind of Anti-America in South Africa, expanding north, grabbing the Ottoman Empire during WWI, and poised for the conquest of Europe as Germany bogs down in Russia in 1942. This sets the stage for Marching Through Georgia, and all the rest follows. It is impossible to overpraise Stirling as a writer of altrnate military history, but he is much, much more: his Anti-America is a brilliant and disturbing provocation to rethink the contours and possibilities of American political culture and history. I have never read anything remotely like these books: they are mostly criticized by people who cannot bear their implications. They are, incidently, hypnotically interesting pageturners, and you'll be cursing when they end--out of frustration that the intoxication of reading them must be suspended. Buy 'em now. This is as good as AH gets.
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