Buy New
$18.48
Qty:1
  • List Price: $25.00
  • Save: $6.52 (26%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Trade in your item
Get a $4.32
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Stone and Dung, Oil and Spit: Jewish Daily Life in the Time of Jesus Paperback – April 12, 2011


Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$18.48
$14.44 $12.00

Frequently Bought Together

Stone and Dung, Oil and Spit: Jewish Daily Life in the Time of Jesus + The Archaeology of the Holy Land: From the Destruction of Solomon's Temple to the Muslim Conquest
Price for both: $48.73

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 375 pages
  • Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company (April 12, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0802865585
  • ISBN-13: 978-0802865588
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.3 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #480,213 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“Jodi Magness brings literary evidence from both Jewish and New Testament writings together with extensive archaeological material to produce a literally ‘down to earth’ picture of the conditions and customs of daily life in the late Second Temple period. Essential reading for all who are interested in that period.”
— Fergus Millar
Oriental Institute, Oxford

“A superb handbook on Jewish daily life in the late Second Temple period. Magness demonstrates how texts and archaeology, with careful scholarship, can illuminate each other. This book will be valuable for undergraduates, graduate students, and all scholars of the period for a long time to come.”
— Sidnie White Crawford
University of Nebraska-Lincoln

“Magness’s originality and her mastery of the sources make this a major contribution to our field.”
— Lawrence H. Schiffman
New York University

About the Author

Jodi Magness is Kenan Distinguished Professor for Teaching Excellence in Early Judaism at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. In addition to Qumran and the Dead Sea Scrolls, her research interests include ancient pottery, ancient synagogues, and the Roman army in the East, and she has published and lectured extensively on these subjects. She has participated in twenty different excavations in Israel and Greece, including serving as codirector of the 1995 excavations in the Roman siege works at Masada. Her works include the award-winning books The Archaeology of Qumran and the Dead Sea Scrolls and The Archaeology of the Early Islamic Settlement in Palestine.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
5
3 star
0
2 star
3
1 star
0
See all 10 customer reviews
You can pick it up, read a chapter that sounds interesting and put it down.
Stephen T. Haynes
While the title of this book may seem more exciting than the contents, the book did discuss each of the mentioned subjects.
Susan
Perhaps I carp too much since Magness is not a New Testament scholar and must rely on scholars in that field.
R. J. Karris

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

31 of 32 people found the following review helpful By R. J. Karris on May 31, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
In this fine book there are twelve chapters: Footprints in Archaeology and Text; Purifying the Body and Hands; Creeping and Swarming Creatures, Locusts, Fish, Dogs, Chickens, and Pigs; Household Vessels: Pottery, Oil Lamps, Glass, Stone, and Dung; Dining Customs and Communal Meals; Sabbath Observance and Fasting; Coins; Clothing and Tzitzit; Oil and Spit; Toilets and Toilet Habits; Tombs and Burial Customs; Epilogue: The Aftermath of 70. There are 48 black and white figures that help illumine discussions in the body of the text.

The most satisfying chapter is "Tombs and Burial Customs" while the least satisfying is "Dining Customs and Communal Meals." "Dining Customs" would have been stronger if materials discussed in the previous chapter (pp. 59-62 'Village Dining and Pottery') had been included.

In my opinion the subtitle should have been "Jewish Daily Life at Qumran" since Magness, a Qumran expert, dedicates so many pages to Qumran. In other words, there might have been more about Jesus of Nazareth and the Jewish Christian communities behind the four Gospels. Perhaps I carp too much since Magness is not a New Testament scholar and must rely on scholars in that field. But sometimes she misses important NT input. For example, in her chapter on "Oil and Spit" (p. 129) she is so intent to make her point that spit was viewed as impure that she misses the significance of Mark 7:33: "Jesus ... spat and touched his tongue." Jesus' action is curative, as one of Magness' frequently cited NT scholars, Joel Marcus, says on p. 473 of his Anchor Bible Commentary on Mark's Gospel: "Spittle was extremely popular as a folk remedy in antiquity ... the idea of its medicinal effectiveness was widespread among Jews as well.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Stephen T. Haynes on November 6, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I purchased this book because of its title. Thought it interesting. However, it is an extremely interesting and informative book. It really talks about what the living conditions were for people in the middle east 2000 years ago. It talks about things that are not talked about in other books - the nitty-gritty of every day living. This book is nice because you do not have to read it sequentially. You can pick it up, read a chapter that sounds interesting and put it down. Next time read a different chapter.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
An archaeologist puts a few aspects of ancient Jewish life under the magnifying glass.

With a strong interest in the time and place that this book examines, and having enjoyed the author’s The Archaeology Of Qumran And The Dead Sea Scrolls, I was more than willing to buy this volume. And in the main I think it delivered the goods, even though I believe that its subtitle, “Jewish Daily Life in the Time of Jesus”, is not really an accurate description of its contents. For, as the main title suggests, this book looks closely at certain material details of that Jewish daily life; it does not set out to give a full, rounded sense of life in ancient Judea.

Those material details, though, are interesting and telling. The author looks at what both archaeology and ancient text sources have to say about the ancient Jews’ attitudes and habits regarding the ritual purity of their bodies and hands; various animals such as locusts, dogs, and chickens; and their household vessels and eating arrangements. Probably my favorite chapter was 10, “Toilets and Toilet Habits”, in which Magness impassively examines this important but often overlooked aspect of everyday life.

Her method in general is to look at various text sources, biblical, ancient, and modern, and see how the current archaeological record fits with the various views. When all the evidence is presented, she offers her own opinions, which are always cautious and reasonable.

The author comes across as sober and conscientious. Fanciful speculation and word-painting are as alien to Magness’s style as levity. She’s not afraid to weigh in on controversial topics, such as the authenticity of the ossuary of James, brother of Jesus, but only after long consideration of all the evidence.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A boring read but filled with helpful and reliable information about life in ancient times. I came away with a better picture of Israel in the days of Jesus and realized how difficult it was to live in that environment. Dr. Magness tells a lot about how archeologists study and learn about people who lived so long ago. Recommended reading for serious students of the Bible.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Pastor Eric on June 17, 2014
Format: Paperback
The gospel message came in its fullness at a point in time and space. Jesus walked the earth and carried out ministry in the Galilean hills of first century Judea. The Roman Empire controlled the nation of Israel and operated its influence over the whole of the land. However, it was religious sectarians such as the Pharisees and Sadducees that were respected and hailed as the people's true leaders. Daily life was agrarian in most parts of the country and social norms and cultural events were defined by the pages of scripture and the legal interpretations of the law. While such details might seem to be for nothing more than historical note, those who desire to fully understand the gospel in its proper context need to study them. In a look back at this ancient culture, one can broaden and more accurately discern the fullness of the Biblical text.

Within her work, Stone and Dung, Oil and Spit: Jewish Daily Life in the Time of Jesus Christ, author Jodi Magness seeks to put forth her expertise in the area of archaeology to help readers understand this ancient time period. As the chapters unfold a broad range of subjects is covered including dietary restrictions, purification rites, and burial customs. Physical objects such as coins, pottery, and clothing are covered in detail. The goal is to give the readers an appreciation of this ancient age and its daily life.

Unfortunately, the title is not completely accurate. While the Essene community at Qumran comprised a small segment of the population during the second temple period, it is given primary importance in this book. Indeed the content covering this remarkably preserved site overwhelms every chapter.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Search