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Stonewall Jackson: The Black Man's Friend Hardcover – Bargain Price, September 1, 2006


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Hardcover, Bargain Price, September 1, 2006
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Cumberland House Publishing (September 1, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 158182565X
  • ASIN: B005DIAC52
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 5.9 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,829,602 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Exhaustively researched, teeming with useful nuggets, and written with an undertone of faith that Jackson himself would have admired, this study clears the air of a lot of myth, accidental and otherwise. The narrative surprises and informs, memorializes and inspires, all at the same time." Professor James I. Robertson, Jr., Alumni Distinguished Professor in History Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University --James I. Robertson Jr.

"Exhaustively researched, teeming with useful nuggets, and written with an undertone of faith that Jackson himself would have admired, this study clears the air of a lot of myth, accidental and otherwise. The narrative surprises and informs, memorializes and inspires, all at the same time." Professor James I. Robertson, Jr., Alumni Distinguished Professor in History Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University --James I. Robertson Jr.

About the Author

RICHARD G. WILLIAMS JR. is a well-published author and speaker on subjects related to the Civil War. A regular contributor to the Washington Times' Civil War column, Williams also frequently contributes articles about the War Between the States to newspapers and history and homeschooling magazines. The descendant of three Confederate soldiers and a twenty-six year veteran Sunday-school teacher, he has lectured at Liberty Universtiy's annual Civil War Seminar and is the author of The Maxims of Robert E. Lee for Young Gentlemen. Williams is active in a number of historical preservationist organizations and lives in Virginia's Shenandoah Valley.

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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Studge on November 14, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Anyone interested in understanding the Mighty Stonewall must read this book. Author Richard G. Williams Jr. hails from the Shenandoah Valley and brings the reader right into Jackson's intimate surroundings, from the time the future general was an orphan child at Jackson's Mill up through his adult years in Lexington, introducing the reader to a host of people, both black and white, young and not so young, who impacted his life, and whom he, in turn, had a profound effect upon.

There was Joe Lightburn, a boyhood friend, who shared with Jackson his love for books and impressed upon him the idea that slavery was wrong and that blacks should be taught to read and learn the Bible. There was "Uncle Robinson," a trusted black servant, who took good care of Jackson and his sister when they were youngsters, during the time their mother was ill and near death. Later, during Jackson's adult years at Lexington, there was John Lyle, the owner of a local bookstore, who loaned Jackson prayer books and guided him towards embracing Presbyterianism.

In Lexington, Jackson owned 3 slaves, which his second wife, Anna, received as a wedding present from her father. Jackson was kind and compassionate to these slaves, teaching them to read and requiring that they attend family worship services in his household. In 1855, while serving as a professor at the Virginia Military Institute in Lexington, Jackson began teaching slaves and free blacks at a black Sunday-school class, even though such a practice was prohibited by the Virginia legislature. In doing so, he risked both criminal prosecution and public ridicule at a time when Nat Turner's revolt was still a fresh memory in the minds of Virginians.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By momof4 on October 3, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
It will bring you to tears before you even get out of the first chapter. I am thinking of ordering a 2nd copy.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Paul on May 18, 2013
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Reads much like a college term paper. Well documented but some of the author's conclusions are suspect in my opinion. I enjoyed the subject and am happy that someone has attempted to explore it. General Jackson was truly an enigma and remarkable man in a very positive way.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Gary Googe on February 18, 2013
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I knew a little about this side of Jackson's life, but not nearly all this author brought out. He did a fabulous job with it.
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21 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Robert L. Drane on January 10, 2007
Format: Hardcover
This is an excellent work on the in-depth Christian character of Thomas (Stonewall) Jackson. Mr. Williams has obviously spent countless hours gleaning the information contained in this volume. His interviews with several direct links to the Lexington Colored Sabbath School add just the right touch to tie all the information together.

I highly recommend this book to anyone seeking information on the true character of T.J. (Stonewall) Jackson.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Dave on March 6, 2014
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Great research. I would have given 5 but it was a little heavy on the religious side. Nevertheless, you can tell Williams did an awful lot of historical digging and comes up with much historical tidbits. ...Dave
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Nancy M. Vanalstyne on June 20, 2013
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To judge a Confederate for being an enemy for the greater good, as I simply did for decades, is quite superficial thinking. Both Lee and Jackson were outstanding men. Jackson acknowledged the evil of slavery, but fought the federal intrusion in the solution. His love for his fellowman touches me deeply as "Gods ways are above our ways" The Civil was was a tragedy where we should not quickly judge the 'good and bad men"
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