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Stop Kiss - Acting Edition Paperback – June 1, 2000

ISBN-13: 978-0822217312 ISBN-10: 0822217317

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 64 pages
  • Publisher: Dramatists Play Service, Inc. (June 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0822217317
  • ISBN-13: 978-0822217312
  • Product Dimensions: 0.2 x 5 x 7.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #32,556 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

It doesn't do this play justice to say that much of the action takes place in a hospital room around the bed of a comatose woman. On the other hand, it may explain why critics have been so impressed. From unpromising material--standard urban settings, stilted exchanges, missed cues, private jokes, half-finished sentences--Diana Son has crafted a subtle, moving drama about vulnerability and risk. When Callie, a twentysomething New York traffic reporter, promises to take on a cat owned by Sara, "some friend of an old friend of someone," she arranges to leave quickly after Sara drops off the cat so that she doesn't get drawn into a dull evening with a stranger. Callie is an expert at avoiding conflict, which serves her well in the city. Sara, on the other hand, has willingly left her job at a Quaker school in St. Louis to teach third-graders in the Bronx. Although both are "straight" women, they circle each other warily, nursing an unspoken attraction. The playwright's choice to shuttle back and forth in time, between the hospital room and police station and the early days of Callie and Sara's friendship, lends a bittersweet quality to even their lightest exchanges, allowing us to wonder, along with the two women, whether the violent outcome of their single kiss makes it a bad idea. Stop Kiss revises Romeo and Juliet, with one thug and the mores of a nation standing in for the family feud. --Regina Marler --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on January 4, 2001
Format: Hardcover
I stumbled upon this play at the Soho Writer's Centre during my time in London last year. It was so good I saw it twice, and I would have gone again had it not closed. There's something bittersweet and special about this story, and the way it is told is electric. I couldn't wait to get to the next scene, and at the end, I wanted to spend more time with these women. It's sad that in today's society we can't just leave each other alone to live and love as our heart leads us to. This is just one story. There are so many more...
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Nathan on April 16, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Stop, Kiss is a well thought out, well-written play about "different ways people can love one another." The story is told in a unique manner -- it starts with a scene from the present, before the climax, and then the next scene takes place afterwards, and so on, so we never actually see the event happen but learn about it before and after the fact. Interestingly, confusingly as it may seem, this is a very effective means.
The story is about two single New York women, one a teacher, the other a traffic reporter, both of whom have had failed relationships with others in the past. Over time, they realize that they have fallen in love, only to be physically assaulted by an outraged homophobe as they share their first kiss. The play shows us not only the events leading to this, but all the trauma and drama afterwards.
While the play starts off a little slowly, it escalates into an engaging, important, and relevant picture of modern life and the attitudes and views surrounding homosexuality in today's culture. I recommend seeing this play if it comes your way.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By seattle user on February 4, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I was introduced to this story when a co-worker at a summer job was auditioning for a part in the local community theater. She left the book behind and so I picked it up to read during my lunch break. I loved the play immediately. I had never read a play before (unless it was something required for English class in high school) but this story captured me immediately. It is a quick read... not very long. I loved it. That was in 2002.

Fast forward to 2010, and I never forgot this story. It came up in conversation and I had decided that I wanted to read it again. I had a hard time finding it locally at my library, so I went ahead and purchased it. I was a little disappointed that the copy was essentially the size of a Program Handout you get when going to a play or other event. You know.. the kind that is held together by a staple or two. It easily gets lost on my bookshelves compared to books with spines.

That being said, it is a wonderful story, and just as good the second time around. Highly recommend this quick read.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Michael J. Mazza HALL OF FAME on October 1, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Diana Son's play "Stop Kiss" was produced in New York City in 1998. The play tells the story of two women: Callie, a New York City traffic reporter, and Sara, a schoolteacher transplanted from St. Louis. Their growing attraction to each other is impacted by an act of homophobic violence.
Son tells the story in nonlinear fashion; this technique is very effective. Ultimately, "Stop Kiss" is a moving exploration of violence and survival, and of the tension between remaining silent and bearing witness. This is a play that also works in book form as a reader's text. I recommend it for those with an interest in contemporary playwriting or in the sociological issue of bias-related violence.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Curtis Lane on June 3, 2002
Format: Paperback
This is an excelent exploration of love and what constitutes it, and a painful reminder of hate--specifically homophobia. The message here is one worth hearing, and the telling of it is skilled and a pleasure to read. Highly Recommended.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By S. McCasland on February 1, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Diano Son captures this touching store told in scenes that jump from present to past. Every other scene tells the present and past of two women who fall in love without the knowledge of their sexuality. When one is beat and injured by a madman in the city, they must confront their families with their sexuality. One, too unstable to be on her own, needs the other. The story is touching, melodic and wonderful.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Juliane Johnson on June 14, 2007
Format: Paperback
I was Sara in a production of this play. However, that is not the only reason that I love it. I first read the play for a women playwrights class that I was in, and I instantly fell in love with it. My director described it best when she said "I read the last page, gasped, then went straight back to the beginning and read it again." I feel that way every time I re-read the script. After speaking these words for months of rehearsals and performances, I still gasp. Diana Son herself said it best when she said that it isn't a play about homosexuality or violence. It's a play about love. I think it's a play about humanity. But most of all, it's a play about taking chances and finding out who you really are no matter what that means.
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By S. McCasland on February 1, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Diano Son captures this touching store told in scenes that jump from present to past. Every other scene tells the present and past of two women who fall in love without the knowledge of their sexuality. When one is beat and injured by a madman in the city, they must confront their families with their sexuality. One, too unstable to be on her own, needs the other. The story is touching, melodic and wonderful.
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