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Stop Sleeping Through Your Dreams: A Guide to Awakening Consciousness During Dream Sleep Hardcover – December, 1995


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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

The notion of dreaming one's way to greater mental health may seem irresistible; the catch here is that hard work is involved. McPhee, a former staffer at the Cedars-Sinai Sleep Disorders Center in Los Angeles, asserts that lucid dreams, i.e., ones in which the dreamer is actually conscious of dreaming, provide access to the unconscious mind and thus to fuller knowledge of the whole self, which can lead to happiness and self-esteem. Achieving lucid dreaming, however, is no simple feat. Techniques for remembering one's dreams and for using their incongruities and distortions as cues to conscious observation are detailed. The task then becomes to integrate the conscious and the unconscious, again no simple, short-term task. Beginning with a review of sleep research (e.g., everyone dreams about 100 minutes a night and, yes, in color), McPhee blends science (psychoanalytic and neurological) and somewhat academic self-help to yield pop psychology on a challenging level.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

These two books represent different ends of the spectrum of dream studies, a field that has grown rapidly in scholarly achievement and popular interest. The Quenks' book is narrowly focused on how to interpret dreams from a Jungian perspective. No time is spent on ancillary topics like remembering dreams, speculating on their nature, etc. They apply a set of questions to the dream, which, they reassure readers, will clarify most dreams. This limited approach may help some readers floundering with the notoriously difficult task of making sense of their own dreams. Unfortunately, the authors throw their entire system into some disarray on the final page when they report, "Prospective, religious, and very private dreams should be permitted to evolve naturally for the dreamer. An interpretation of these dreams may interrupt an important ongoing process by analyzing it." But just how does one know if a particular dream falls into one of those categories without some thought and analysis? McPhee's book, on the other hand, is basically Freudian in outlook and extremely diffuse. The title would seem to indicate it deals with how to achieve lucidity in dreams. Yet little space is devoted to that topic; instead, the author speculates on a variety of philosophical questions concerning consciousness and identity and resolves those questions with a long explanation of the Freudian mechanism of repression. There's nothing new here. The best book on dreams is Robert Van De Castle's Our Dreaming Mind (LJ 8/94) with Gayle Delaney's Breakthrough Dreaming (Bantam, 1991) and Stephen LaBerge's Lucid Dreaming (Tarcher, 1985) the best choices for the subtopics of interpretation and lucidity, respectively. Larger libraries with a readership hungry for new material on dreams may want to purchase the Quenk title; the McPhee title can be safely passed up.
Mary Ann Hughes, Neill P.L., Pullman, Wash.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Henry Holt & Co; 1st edition (December 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0805025006
  • ISBN-13: 978-0805025002
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 6 x 8.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,054,015 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Fosseldorf on September 18, 2011
Format: Hardcover
I found Stop Sleeping Through Your Dreams in a public library in Ithaca, NY and read it without expectation, knowing that I was interested in learning to lucid dream but without any knowledge of how deep this genre was. Now, of course, I see there are many books. Anyway, I read it for a few days, followed the instructions, and sure enough I had a lucid dream. First one ever. What else could you ask for?
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By R. Rees on August 7, 2010
Format: Hardcover
An interesting book. I learned more about dreaming from McPhee's book. McPhee writes about dreaming as applied psychology. Lucid dreaming becomes a way to bring the unconscious into consciousness, which he sees as the primary practice of psychology and self-analysis. The problem he sees is repression which is unconscious and not available to the ego during normal waking consciousness. His goal is to become more aware of what and when we are repressing. Dreams put us in contact with the unconscious and the repressed material -- if we can become conscious in our dreams (lucid dreaming). He has a chapter on lucid dreamers of the past. But what is missing from this book is explanation of how to accomplish lucid dreaming or references for how to pursue this. There is a long section that is an extended extract from the writing of Gurdjieff which seemed the least relevant or interesting to me. The chapters reviewing the history of sleep and dream research are interesting (but maybe dated at this point).
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on December 26, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Charles died, bless his heart. He wrote a terrific book about dreaming. It is full of nuts and bolts information about getting down and dirty in your dreams. The basic idea is to see yourself in your dream and then it becomes a conscious experience in an unconscious state of being...sleep. Charles has or had a great website about dreams. This is the first book you need to read if you want to wake up in your dreams. It is presented like you might be able to understand it. This book is available for one cent plus 3.99 for shipping. I send it to my friends. If you do not want to know about your dreams, do not get this book. Everytime I started reading this book, it put me to sleep and into a dream state. I see many people who say this book is off track...but really folks, this author writes the truth...if you want deception read anything else.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
No lucid dreaming book has ever pinpointed CONSCIOUSNESS to this degree and the major role it plays .... be smart and buy this book.
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