Buy Used
$4.00
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This book has already been loved by someone else. It MIGHT have some wear and tear on the edges, have some markings in it, or be an ex-library book. Over-all itâ?TMs still a good book at a great price! (if it is supposed to contain a CD or access code, that may be missing)
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Stop Walking on Eggshells: Taking Your Life Back When Someone You Care About Has Borderline Personality Disorder Paperback – July 1, 1998


See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback, July 1, 1998
$5.55 $0.40

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 258 pages
  • Publisher: New Harbinger Pubns Inc; 1st edition (July 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 157224108X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1572241084
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 5.9 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (241 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #39,338 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Paul T. Mason is a program manager of Child/Adolescent Services and a psychotherapist with Psychiatric Services for St. Luke's Hospital in Racine, Wisconsin. His research on borderline personality disorder (BPD) has appeared in the Journal of Clinical Psychology, and he teaches seminars for mental health professional on the effects of BPD on partners and family members.

Randi Kreger is a professional writer and president of Kreger Marketing Group. Frustrated with lack of information about BPD and families, she initiated an internet discussions a group and a site on the web for people who care about someone with borderline personality disorder.

Kreger is also the author of The Stop Walking on Eggshells Workbook.

In addition to Stop Walking on Eggshells, Randi Kreger is the author of The Stop Walking on Eggshells Workbook (New Harbinger, 2002) and The Essential Family Member Guide to Borderline Personality Disorder: New Tools and Techniques to Stop Walking on Eggshells (Hazelden Publishing, 2008).

Kreger's website, BPDCentral.com, is one of the longest-established, popular, and largest sites about BPD on the Internet. BPDCentral is the home of her "Welcome to Oz" online support community, a group she founded in 1995. The community is home to some 16,000 family members who gather in 15 different lists, or "neighborhoods," depending upon the type of relationship or living situation they have with someone with BPD.

Kreger was also instrumental in the formation of the Personality Disorders Awareness Network (PDAN), a not-for-profit organization. She speaks and gives workshops about BPD internationally.

Customer Reviews

This book sheds light on many issues related to BPD, which makes it really worth reading.
N. Silva
The book then moves on to suggest very common-sense approaches to dealing with day-to-day problems one may encounter during life with a BPD individual.
Robert Johnson
I found this book very informational and helpful in dealing with my family member who has a borderline personality disorder.
T. Mills

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1,040 of 1,087 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 24, 1998
Format: Paperback
I don't know how Randi Kreger and Paul Mason did it, but they have made a singular contribution to the world with their web site and with the publication of this life-saving book. Please allow me to post this from the book for anyone looking for help in or out of a bad situation right now:
Predictable Stages: People who love someone with BPD seem to go through similar stages. The longer the relationship has lasted, the longer each stage seems to take. Although these are listed in the general order in which people go through them, most people move back and forth among different stages.
Confusion Stage. This generally occurs before a diagnosis of BPD is known. Non-BPs struggle to understand why borderlines sometimes behave in ways that seem to make no sense. They look for solutions that seem elusive, blame themselves, or resign themselves to living in chaos. Even after learning about BPD, it can take non-BPs weeks or months to really comprehend on an intellectual level how the BP is personally affected by this complex disorder. It can take even longer to absorb the information on an emotional level.
Outer-Directed Stage. In this stage, non-borderlines turn their attention toward the person with the disorder, urging them to seek professional help, attemping to get them to change, and trying their best not to trigger problematic behavior. People at this stage usually learn all they can about BPD in an effort to understand and empathize with the person they care about. It can take nopn-BPs a long time to acknowledge feelings of anger and grief--especially when the BP is a parent or child. Anger is an extremely common reaction, even though most non-BPs understand on an intellectual level that BPD is not the borderline's fault.
Read more ›
10 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
413 of 436 people found the following review helpful By Kate McMurry TOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on August 12, 2001
Format: Paperback
Paul T. Mason, M.S., C.P.C., is a program manager of Child/Adolescent Services at St. Luke's Hospital and a psychotherapist in private practice at Psychiatric Services in Racine, Wisconsin. His research on borderline personality disorder ("BPD") has appeared in the Journal of Clinical Psychology, and he teaches seminars for mental health professionals on the effects of BPD on partners and family members.
Randi Kreger is a professional writer and an executive in public relations and marketing. She has collected more than 1,000 stories detailing the devastating experiences of people in close relationship with persons suffering from BPD ("BP's"). Kreger moderates two e-mail discussion groups for friends and family of BP's on her comprehensive Web site about BPD: [....]
Mason and Kreger's carefully written, highly readable book provides a brilliant analysis of a disorder that wreaks enormous havoc. In addition to clarifying what BPD is, they provide crucial survival techniques for those who wish to stay in relationship with the BP's they love.
There are extensive references and a list of recommended resources in this 258-page book as well as appendices on the following subjects: coping suggestions for clinicians, tips for BP's who have other BP's in their lives, a summary of causes and treatment of BPD. The topics covered in the main body of the book include: (1) understanding BPD behavior; (2) keeping control of your life while in close association with a BP; (3) resolving special issues, including raising a BP child, distortion campaigns of the BP against you, making decisions about continuing your relationship with the adult BP in your life.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
242 of 254 people found the following review helpful By Barbara Davis-Thompson on September 7, 2000
Format: Paperback
This book brings humane understanding to the often perjorative term Borderline Personality Disorder and brings the reader to deeper understanding of those who suffer from this disorder, letting the sufferers of this illness be known as persons with damaged internal vulnerability that often can't be articulated, just acted out or in by the individual. What sets this book far above many books on BPD is the research the authors did utilizing the non-local reaches of the internet to quiz a number of persons in BPD self-help groups and also the self-help group(s) of persons who love and cope with those who have BPD. The comprehensiveness of this book is wide, indeed, in scope and what is profoundly interesting are the specific insights BP persons and those who love and care for them give which take you deep into the personal experience, agonies and challenges of coping with behaviors of this often misunderstood mental illness. The book also includes techniques for those who must deal with the rages and unpredictability of the PB person. One key piece of advice is to stop being a sponge for the feeling states that those with BP project onto those nearest them. Easily understood directions are listed on how to mirror the BP, hold to limits in a respectful, yet firm way, and to support the BP getting the help they need for the book strongly addresses the concept that ultimately those with BPD are responsible for their behavior. The authors give the reader interesting and useable scripts, provocative personal comments that make the reader deeply reflect on the agony of the BP's mental states and clearly details step-by-step what to do if you are the spouse, child or parent of a loved one with BPD.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search