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Stories from Puerto Rico / Historias de Puerto Rico (English and Spanish Edition) Paperback – June 11, 1999


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill; 1st edition (June 11, 1999)
  • Language: English, Spanish
  • ISBN-10: 0844204021
  • ISBN-13: 978-0844204024
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 0.5 x 6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #124,738 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Robert L. Muckley and Adela Martinez-Santiago are experienced authors of several language books.


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66 of 67 people found the following review helpful By Luis Hernandez on August 5, 2000
Format: Paperback
As a compilation of 18 legends, true-life experiences, and mysteries, "Stories from Puerto Rico," provides that reader with a wide array of stories all relating to the island's folklore and supernatural occurrences. The book's bilingual text, allowing both English and Spanish-language readers to enjoy these tales and accounts. The chronological order of these stories also is beneficial to classify which legends/accounts are recent and which are from the Spanish-colonial era. The tales in this book goes as follows:
(1) Creation {Pre-Colombian tale}: Discusses the Taino Indians (original island inhabitants) belief on how their gods created the Antilles.
(2) The Death of Salcedo {1511}: True-life tale of the murder of a Spanish conquistador by the Tainos, who wanted to determine whether or not he was a god. The drowning of this man in an island river helped the natives realize that the Spaniards were not from heaven.
(3) Guanina {1511}: A legend similar to a Puerto Rican version of Romeo & Juliet. Spanish conquistador-Taina love story ending in tragedy.
(4) The Miracles of Our Lady of Monserrate {1600}: The apparition of the Virgin in the town of Hormigueros caused many to build a shrine in her honor. Similar to the apparition of the Virgin in Lourdes and Fatima, this one was different because it involved the image of the Virgin of Monserrate, the black virgin who is the patron saint of Catalonia (Spain).
(5) The Snake's Curve {1700}: a legend involving a witch's curse that turned a woman from the town of Guayama into a snake.
(6) The Devil's Sentry Box {1790}: A legend that took place in San Juan involving the disappearances of several Spanish soldiers guarding the city from a Sentry House near San Cristobal Castle.
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42 of 43 people found the following review helpful By Luis Hernandez on August 5, 2000
Format: Paperback
As a compilation of 18 legends, true-life experiences, and mysteries, "Stories from Puerto Rico," provides that reader with a wide array of stories all relating to the island's folklore and supernatural occurrences. The book's bilingual text, allowing both English and Spanish-language readers to enjoy these tales and accounts. The chronological order of these stories also is beneficial to classify which legends/accounts are recent and which are from the Spanish-colonial era. The tales in this book goes as follows:
(1) Creation {Pre-Colombian tale}: Discusses the Taino Indians (original island inhabitants) belief on how their gods created the Antilles.
(2) The Death of Salcedo {1511}: True-life tale of the murder of a Spanish conquistador by the Tainos, who wanted to determine whether or not he was a god. The drowning of this man in an island river helped the natives realize that the Spaniards were not from heaven.
(3) Guanina {1511}: A legend similar to a Puerto Rican version of Romeo & Juliet. Spanish conquistador-Taina love story ending in tragedy.
(4) The Miracles of Our Lady of Monserrate {1600}: The apparition of the Virgin in the town of Hormigueros caused many to build a shrine in her honor. Similar to the apparition of the Virgin in Lourdes and Fatima, this one was different because it involved the image of the Virgin of Monserrate, the black virgin who is the patron saint of Catalonia (Spain).
(5) The Snake's Curve {1700}: a legend involving a witch's curse that turned a woman from the town of Guayama into a snake.
(6) The Devil's Sentry Box {1790}: A legend that took place in San Juan involving the disappearances of several Spanish soldiers guarding the city from a Sentry House near San Cristobal Castle.
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39 of 42 people found the following review helpful By Firemanic9 on August 26, 2000
Format: Paperback
I found this book to be very helpful in two important ways: widening my perspective of Latin culture, and bettering my Spanish reading comprehension. The 18 stories are each short enough to keep the reader interested in the story, but filled with enough vocabulary to keep him or her constantly learning. Plus, the reader that is a little shaky can use the opposite page in English as a crutch, and there is also an index of vocabulary in the back of the book if one would prefer that approach. I would recommend this book to anyone who wants to further their vocabulary, while at the same time broaden their cultural perspective.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Aurea E. Padilla on September 2, 2005
Format: Paperback
I recommend this book to all people, especially the Puerto Ricans, because it talks about our roots, our culture and our different ethnic origins. After you read this book you will understand our Spanish people more, know about our needs and be more understandable of Puerto Rican people.

My best regards to Robert L. Muckley and Adela Martínez-Santiago for their great job in this wonderful book.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Gill Doyle on July 6, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is the second "Side-by-Side" book I have read.
I prefer the first, "Stories from Latin America,"
because the editors of that volume better understood
their purpose -- which is to present side-by-side versions
of the same story, such that a reader conversant in one
language but not the other, may learn new vocabulary, verify
verb tense, etc. If one looks at the back cover of "Stories
from Puerto Rico," one sees that it says there that "we've
placed the Spanish and English stories side by side -- lado a
lado -- so you can practice and improve your reading skills in your
new language while enjoying the support of your native language.
That way, you'll avoid the inconvenience of constantly having to
look up unfamiliar words and expressions in a dictionary."
Well, you had better have a dictionary handy if you plan to
learn from this book. I have been exasperated time and again by
English translations that are too loose to be useful. If one is
translating for the purpose of conveying the sense and spirit of
a story, then a precise word-for-word translation is unnecessary.
However, this book is designed for language students who are trying
to learn a foreign language. A precise translation is just what's
needed, and I think it's what was promised on that back cover. Yet,
this is not what the book delivers. Let me give an example. There
are many to choose from. This one appears on page 117. Here's the
Spanish version:

"No sabemos si existió, ni dónde, ni cuándo, pero sus desventuras
han hecho reír a generaciones de puertoriquenos. A continuación
encontrará una versión de una historia de Juan Bobo.
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