Qty:1
  • List Price: $19.99
  • Save: $4.87 (24%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 5 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Solid used copy with visible wear. FREE SHIPPING w/AMAZON PRIME!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Storm of the Century: New England's Great Blizzard of 1978 Paperback – February 6, 2003


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback, February 6, 2003
"Please retry"
$15.12
$13.50 $7.33
12%20Days%20of%20Deals%20in%20Books


Frequently Bought Together

Storm of the Century: New England's Great Blizzard of 1978 + Greater Boston's Blizzard of 1978 (Images of America: Massachusetts) + The Blizzard of '78
Price for all three: $45.34

Some of these items ship sooner than the others.

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 144 pages
  • Publisher: Times Square Books (February 6, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0972784500
  • ISBN-13: 978-0972784504
  • Product Dimensions: 0.2 x 6.2 x 8.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #684,913 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Christopher Haraden has worked as a reporter and editor for various newspapers in Massachusetts and New York. His publication credits include numerous tourism, historical, financial and real estate publications across New England.

In 2001, he was a contributing author for "Hull & Nantasket Beach: Then & Now," published by Arcadia, a collaborative effort of the Committee for the Preservation of Hull's History. With "Storm of the Century" completed, he will next co-author a revised introduction to the 35th anniversary edition of "Old Nantasket," Dr. William M. Bergan's classic history of Hull that has been out of print for years. The new edition is scheduled to be released in the summer of 2003.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
6
4 star
0
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 7 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By L. M Young VINE VOICE on August 10, 2005
As someone who survived the drive home at the height of the storm, I enjoy all accounts of the stories of hardship and friendship during the event. This account concentrates much of the narration on the horrendous destruction of the Massachusetts coastline and its residents--the photos alone will make you pause.

My complaint is not directed to Haraden: both books I have about the blizzard concern the effects in Massachusetts. How about a blizzard book from the RI POV? Anyone?
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By John J. Galluzzo on October 10, 2003
Tragedies of national significance can remain etched in the human psyche for an entire lifetime. Pearl Harbor, the Kennedy assassination, the Challenger disaster, September 11, the Columbia disintegration, and even the front line footage of the war in Iraq act as memory triggers for those who experienced them through the newspaper, radio, television or internet, not to mention those men, women and children who had the misfortune of witnessing them in person.
Tragedies of a regional or local nature can have the same effect. The only major difference is the number of people who share the memories. While almost any of the nearly three hundred million Americans around on September 11 can today meet in any coffee shop, health club or on any street corner in the nation and share their experiences of "where they were when they heard," much smaller segments of society can trade stories of localized tales like famous fires or powerful storms.
New England has reluctantly hosted many such events, from the opening days of the American Revolution onward. And although the impact of the event has been lost since the last living witness passed on, one can almost imagine the feelings of insecurity that must have run through the streets of Boston as British regulars and Colonial troops fired upon each other in pitched battles in and around the city.
A coastal region like New England is impacted most severely by the forces of Mother Nature, strong winds, surging seas, and heavy snows.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Larson on February 8, 2009
Verified Purchase
I bought this as I'd lived throught this storm and have vivid memories of trying to get home from Massachusetts to Connecticut. The book is OK, not great. Good pictures, but most of the written material references coastal Massachusetts. Living in Connecticut, I felt it gave short shrift to experiences of other places in New England. I would have appreciated a broader perspective.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Expressed Reviews TOP 500 REVIEWER on November 1, 2012
Verified Purchase
Having lived in Massachusetts during the Blizzard of 78; it was a great pleasure to find this account of the incredible storm. I remember the meteorologists saying that it would be the storm of the century, but when it didn't arrive on schedule, I figured that it was just another blown forecast. The reason why the initial forecasts were wrong, is because the storm was being blocked to the south by a Canadian high pressure system. It took over 12 hours for precipitation to move from NYC to Boston. The same high pressure system that was causing the delay in the start-up of the storm, also ended up being the blocking force that kept the snow going for days. All of this is highlighted in this wonderful book that brings back memories of this momentous event.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?