Storm in a Teacup 2013 NR CC

Amazon Instant Video

Available in HD
(11) IMDb 6.7/10
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Vivien Leigh plays the daughter of politician Cecil Parker in a small Scottish town who is under attack by the local paper.

Starring:
Vivien Leigh, Rex Harrison
Runtime:
1 hour, 27 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

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Product Details

Genres Romance, Comedy
Director Ian Dalrymple, Victor Saville
Starring Vivien Leigh, Rex Harrison
Supporting actors Cecil Parker, Sara Allgood, Ursula Jeans, Gus McNaughton, Edgar K. Bruce, Robert Hale, Quentin McPhearson, Arthur Wontner, Eliot Makeham, George Pughe, Arthur Seaton, Cecil Mannering, Ivor Barnard, Cyril Smith, W.G. Fay, Stuart Hibberd, Mervyn Johns, Ernest Roberts
Studio Cohen Media Group
MPAA rating NR (Not Rated)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 3-day viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Loyd E. Eskildson HALL OF FAME on September 8, 2010
Format: VHS Tape
"Storm in a Teacup" is a British satire - filmed in the early 1930's- of American screwball comedy. It struck me just odd and mesmerizing at same time - seeing Vivien Leigh and Rex Harrison very early in their careers playing off-beat charming characters. Rex Harrison (I hardly recognized him) plays a English reporter (Frank Brudon) who lands in a small Scottish town. He gets an interview (it even shows him taking Greg Shorthand) with the Provost (Cecil Parker) who is dictating his achievements and full of himself. Brudon changes the story around to focus on an ice cream vendor, Mrs. Hegarty, who won't buy her dog a license and the Provost, along with other authorities, threaten to kill it. The revised story sparks a revolt in the small town and threatens the positions of people in power.

One scene stuck out as goofy as Brudon was eating oatmeal, salting, buttering it - trying to get it down - and exclaiming he did not know how the Scotts ate porridge for breakfast every morning. We even get a close-up of the bowl of oatmeal that he exclaims horses should eat. Another scene involves the Scottish game of golf played with Rex and Vivian Leigh (who plays the Provost's daughter). There is much dialogue on when Vivian Leigh should call "Fore!" - before or after she hits the ball. I sat there wondering why I thought this was interesting.

Political pettiness is magnified through the goofy plot that Mrs. Hegarty's dog is impounded because it had no license. There is a fine that could have been paid by anyone at anytime, but the whole film dithers around the dog and its license. All the local officials and elites give fuel to the insane situations ending up in a court of law with crazy witnesses and pompous officials.
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Format: Amazon Instant Video
Onscreen, Rex Harrison exudes an innate prickliness that sometimes makes it challenging to pull for him. Vivien Leigh, then 23 years old, when asked, reportedly balked at doing pratfalls. Nevertheless, 1937's Storm in a Teacup is a delightful see. It's a marvelous British comedy of manners that, at times, gets rather raucous.

Somewhere on the Scottish West Coast, in the tiny town of Baikie, haughty highlands lass Victoria Gow (Leigh) has returned home, fresh off from finishing her finishing school. She disembarks from the boat just in time to sit on a child's lollipop and, somewhen here, she makes the acquaintance of rumpled reporter Frank Burdon (Harrison, in his first big starring role). In her attempts to clean up her sticky candy-coated dress, he politely asks her, "Would you like some spit?" This ought to give you a sense of how chippy their interactions would be, because Victoria wasn't at all amused by his stab at wry witticism.

They part ways but their worlds soon re-collide. See, Victoria's father happens to be the Provost, William Gow (Cecil Parker), an ambitious political figure and an ogre of a man. For this and that reason, our reporter Frank Burdon decides to champion the cause of a poor local woman (Sara Allgood) whose dog the Provost had caused to be impounded, seeing as how the woman couldn't afford the cost of a dog license. The movie unveils the comic uproar that ensues.

This is the first of two films that paired up Rex Harrison and Vivien Leigh, and, lo, I wonder how eventful the shooting on those sets must have been. What's undeniable is that the two leads develop a nice chemistry. See Leigh's hot-tempered highlands heiress tamed by love.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mataka on January 2, 2009
Format: VHS Tape
Wonderful little film, a must for those who have a soft spot in their hearts for Scotland and their ways. Rex and Vivien are a joy to watch. Both Leonard Maltin's Guide and the New York Times gave it very high ratings and they did not lead us astray.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By louise on August 1, 2014
Format: Amazon Instant Video Verified Purchase
There's really not much Scottish about this, except for the occasional man in a kilt.
it's a light, over-acted, period piece with a very young Rex Harrison and mediocre but luminous actress Vivian Leigh.
The story line is utterly vapid, just right for those times when all you want is a meaningless plot, no violence, gore, sex scenes, nudity or wrenching plot lines that make you wonder if it would really be worth it to live another day.
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Format: VHS Tape
Widowed Mrs. Hegarty (Sara Allgood), ice cream peddler residing in a fictive West Scottish coast village, Baikie, has as sole companion her dog Patsy, but after she neglects to pay an annual canine licensing fee, the Provost (Mayor) of Baikie, William Gow (Cecil Parker) commands that the animal be dispatched, thereby inciting the titular tempest, for which a young English journalist is largely responsible. He is Frank Burdon (Rex Harrison), recently arrived in Baikie to begin employment with its newspaper. "The Advertiser", and it is Frank's willfulness that brings trouble upon himself as well as for others. In spite of romantic mutual attraction between Frank and Gow's daughter Victoria (Vivien Leigh), the dauntless reporter is well pleased to find a strong human interest slant within Mrs. Hegarty's plight and composes a story that immediately is spread throughout Scotland, therewith effectively putting an end to Gow's political ambitions, as he was preparing to stand for a parliamentary post, an aspiration that has apparently gone a-glimmering due to the Patsy affair, with the Provost moved to exact redress from Burdon by suing him for slander, an action that summons the probability of a final break between Frank and Vickie Gow. The film is constructed upon a play, "Storm Over Patsy", written in 1930 by German expatriate to the United States Bruno Frank, who settled in Hollywood as a screenwriter. It was rephrased for its exhibition upon the American stage by Glaswegian James Bridie and mounted with a good deal of success during 1936 and 1937 upon Broadway, the production generally featuring vocative Allgood in addition to Leo G. Carroll as Willie Gow.Read more ›
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