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Stormbringer. Unknown Binding – 1965


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Product Details

  • Unknown Binding
  • Publisher: Publisher (1965)
  • ASIN: B001H0KMBE
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (29 customer reviews)

More About the Author

Born in London in 1939, Michael Moorcock now lives in Texas. A prolific and award-winning writer with more than eighty works of fiction and non-fiction to his name, he is the creator of Elric, Jerry Cornelius and Colonel Pyat, amongst many other memorable characters.

Customer Reviews

All of these books are well written.
Travis Cottreau
In all seriousness, this is my favourite book in my favourite Saga by my favourite author.
Uruloki
If you like fantasy and sword play, this is definitely for you.
Robert Tanory

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Claude Avary on March 10, 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Michael Moorcock created the character of Elric, a doomed albino prince of a dying race who carries a cursed sword called Stormbringer in his wanderings throughout the Young Kingdoms of the humans, in the mid-sixties for "Science Fantasy Magazine." Elric starred in a series of novellas, the last four of which were gathered together to create this single novel, "Stormbringer." Although Moorcock has gone on to write many more novels featuring Elric, "Stormbringer is chronologically the last of the series; the albino prince meets his destiny and the world faces its fate in the eternal battle of law and chaos.
And the saga ends on its highest note; without a doubt, "Stormbringer" is one of the best of Michael Moorcock novels. Most fans consider this finale the best in the series. Even though it was originally published as four novellas, the parts flow together in one concentrated epic of sorcerery, horror, and war. The storyline has the the Theocrat of Pan Tang, Jagreed Lern, ally himself with the Dukes of Hell to spread Chaos across the Earth, warping it in nightmarish ways. Leading the seemingly hopeless struggle against the conquerors, Elric comes to understand finally the destiny appointed him, and that the fate of the entire world -- and the one that will follow it -- rests on his own, hideous sacrifice.
Moorcock's imagination here is feverish and grotesque, the battles sequences are epic and thrilling, and the language is poetic and deeply tragic. Everything that has come before in the saga of Elric (principally in the five earlier novellas that make up "The Werid of the White Wolf" and "The Bane of the Black Sword," as well as the 1972 prequel novel "Elric of Melniboné") crashes together for the cosmic, cathartic conclusion. This stands easily amongst the best fantasy novels ever written, and fine example of dark, philosophic fantasy filled with imagery that you will never forget.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Robert Tanory on November 6, 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I think the ending brings out so much character and depth in Elric. It reminded me of the first book...thus reminding me of what Elric is and where he came from. Everything that you've read about Elric's history comes into focus on the last few pages. If you are trying to pick up a Moorcock book, read Elric of Melnibone' first. If you think the book says too much that the sword "drinks souls"...think about the title for one second, then think about the whole premise for Elric. I was amazed at that comment in one of the summaries, but hey, everybody is entitled to their own opinions. My two cents is this: this is one of the best series I have ever read, and it won't disappoint you. If you like fantasy and sword play, this is definitely for you. Elric helped to reconstruct all of fantasy...isn't that enough to want to make you read these books? It was for me! Enjoy.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Uruloki on July 27, 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Plot:
Elric, Crimson-Eyed Albino, Last Emperor of Melnibon?, Kinslayer (and many more unflattering titles), is still closely bound to his sword, Stormbringer. It being a product of Chaos, much like himself, makes it the perfect weapon against his former Masters.
In this book, the last of the Elric Saga, Elric will at long last learn his Fate. More yet, he will have to blow the Horn of Fate, thrice, before the World can be reborn. But of course, the Lords of Chaos aren't just going to let him destroy everything they own, everything they are.
It's an all out Battle against the Dukes of Hell themselves, and Elric is running out of Allies. The Sourcerer-Albino still has a few tricks up his sleeve, and the Horn of Fate is able to help him rouse the Dragons of Melnibon? from their slumber on the Dragon Isle.
But it will take more than the Mighty Melnibonean Dragons to overcome these forces of Chaos.

While his enemies are numerous and the most powerful forces in all of the Multiverse, Elric is aided by The Servants of Fate. And that is help one cannot overlook.

Of course, that's all I can say, I can't spoil the entire book for you, wouldn't be nice.

Characters:
Michael Moorcock's characters are somewhat unique. Elric most of all. He is in some ways a typical anti-hero, though so much more. The characters, and particularly Elric, are very well thought out, and as Moorcock would say "They're everything Tolkien's characters aren't".
Moonglum is in many ways (still) the exact opposite of Elric. Though they are both part of a greater being, and serve a common purpose, they are entirely different.

Dyvim Slorm again is completely different. Whereas Elric lacked certain Melnibon?
Read more ›
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Sharron Albert on May 12, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
When Stealer of Souls and Stormbringer were first published in the 1960s, there wasn't much fantasy around. William Morris, Lord Dunsany and others of that generation were long out of print; Robert E. Howard's Conan stories were tied up in probate. The Lord of the Rings had just come out, and had turned our heads. Previously the world of science fiction was dominated by hard science fiction -- tales of space exploration, and aliens. Those of us who discovered we liked the fantasy also craved more. If we were lucky, we discovered Joy Chant's Red Moon and Black Mountain, a clever British tale of English schoolchildren whisked into a epic adventure in an alternate world. And then Stealer of Souls arrived (now called Sailer on the Seas of Fate I believe), a series of short stories about Elric, the tortured albino, wielder of the first great runesword, Stormbringer, and Moonglum, his faithful companion. It was so different from Tolkien and Chant, so energetic, it was an instant favorite. It was followed quickly by Stormbringer. I still remember my reaction when I finished it -- an anguished cry of "You can't do that!" But Moorcock could, and did, giving us one the first great unexpected endings. Thirty-plus years later, I reread Stormbringer for a book discussion group. It creaks a bit, but it still holds its place in history. Strongly influenced by the raw style of Robert E. Howard (I learned later once I read the Conan books which were -- finally -- reprinted in the 70s for a whole new generation), Elric remains a unique hero, not a mighty-thewed physical barbarian like Conan, but a mighty sorceror from an ancient race, with a past he's trying to run away from and/or forget. And, because the fans demanded more, Moorcock went back later and filled in the back story.Read more ›
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