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185 of 208 people found the following review helpful
My review is brief as others have almost said it all. I just want to say that I am 62 years old, and just the thought about the way I felt when I saw this movie in the theatre makes me tear up. It is a nostalgic feeling in a big way. Reminds you of your childhood and those special feelings about growing up. You want to grow up and get on to being an adult in the worst way, but thinking back now your childhood was such a very special time. So fleeting and if we're lucky, such a special time in our lives.
I highly recommend the purchase of this movie to add to your collection.
I honestly feel that the series should stop here. Perfect right where it was left.
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172 of 217 people found the following review helpful
I went to the San Francisco Film Festival screening at Pixar Studios last night not really knowing what to expect. Toy Story has been with us for 15 years now (20, in terms of actual development) and I had a sinking feeling that maybe all the character potential had been used in the first two and this was some shameless plot by Disney to exploit the franchise ("Little Mermaid 3", anyone?). Well, shame on me for underestimating the capabilities of Pixar, who once again have shown how a small studio in Emeryville is a storytelling powerhouse that leaves the rest of the industry in the dust.

Toy Story 3 is the tale of Andy, the toys' owner, going to college and their quest to determine their future - headed between the attic or a daycare center. If you've enjoyed the way the first two films blend character drama with innovative action and humor, this cocktail hits its stride in the third film, which draws on everything we already know about the characters and then adds two new entire sets of toys to the plot. There's a new villain, two very amusing romance sub-plots and a litany of visual gags that push the envelope even further. I'm not allowed to go into any details but the second half of the film is a familiar set piece performed in a completely new way that will forever change your view of certain toys and day care centers.

Apart from a level of animation that sets the bar in the industry and an attention to detail that makes you wonder what most "real" films actually do in pre-production, the real genius of the third film is to provide a satisfying conclusion that gives every character a completed character arc. About 20 minutes before the end, I was wondering how they would do this since there were some fairly dark moments (similar to those in Wall-E and Up), but naturally they manage to pull it together. There's literally not a single wasted shot, let alone a wasted scene, and the pace quickens throughout to keep the tension mounting.

Overall, this is another Pixar classic that easily has enough for both kids and adults (and movie aficionados). It's not difficult to see why each of their movies takes five years to complete - yet despite the technical wizardry, the success of their movies is fundamentally routed in their stories, a fact which most other studios seem to forget these days. As to whether the stage is set for Toy Story 4, I suppose they could always pull it off given the creativity at work here, but I think there was a deliberate attempt to make this the last in the series.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon June 21, 2010
This third Toy Story was a winner. The story is a great continuation that spoke to my older son as he outgrows his once beloved Woody & Buzz and still fascinates my younger one.

This movie centers around Andy, all grown up, going away to college and having to clean out his bedroom. Should he donate his old toys? Throw them out? Or keep them in the attic for his children? Woody, Buzz and a few other toys that have survived over the years try one last time to get Andy to play with them. Their failure makes them think they are doomed for the trash pile and rather then suffer this horrible fate, they plot to get into the donate box. Woody insists that Andy intends for them to be stored in the attic but the others do not believe him.

Their arrival at Sunnyside playschool makes them think they've hit the jackpot but all is not as rosy as it seems. There is a dark undercurrent here, lead by a strawberry smelling stuffed bear. This brought cries of horror from my youngest along with lots of questions. Did that mean the toys we donated were being treated horribly too? Although it all ends well, this part stuck with my youngest. I sense trouble the next time I attempt to clean out his closet by donating toys he has outgrown. Thanks Disney.

This movie attempts to cater to all age groups. The parents will need a tissue as it pulls at the heartstrings. From start, by showing a home movie of Andy when he was young and flashing to present day at a teenage Andy gets ready for college, to finish as the mom looks around Andy's empty room. Her child is leaving home. It speaks to tweens who want to leave childish things behind but still have great affection for childhood toys. The appeal to young kids is as strong as ever as we follow the adventures of Woody and Buzz. It did contain another creepy baby to give some nightmares.

There were some mature references for a "G" rated movie. Ken being gay was referenced several times and they had him striking sexy poses. They had Buzz set to Spanish mode where he spoke Spanish for a minute or two. The scene was funny to me but the subtitles annoyed my youngest as he couldn't keep up.

This movie told a great tale of getting older for those kids who grew up with Woody and Buzz. Both my boys could not stop talking about it afterwards. I would skip the 3D version as nothing in the film warrants the use of 3D.
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150 of 197 people found the following review helpful
"Toy Story" was about sibling rivalry. "Toy Story 2" was about loving others, even if it means you might get hurt someday.

So what is "Toy Story 3" about? It takes the whole "kids + loyal toys" theme to its natural conclusion, by showing us what happens when the kids grow up and leave. While the first two-thirds of the movie are fairly pedestrian (for a Pixar movie!), the last part is both action-packed and emotionally wrenching.

Ten years have passed, and Andy is now a college-bound teenager. His toys are anxious about what's going to happen, so Woody keeps assuring them that they'll be put safely in the attic. But a misunderstanding leads to a date with the garbage truck. Since the toys believe they have been abandoned, they jump into the box of donated toys bound for Sunnyside Daycare.

They're greeted by the genial Lots-o'-Hugging Bear (aka Lotso) and the friendly daycare toys, and all seems to be well. But Andy's toys soon discover that Sunnyside is a nighmare -- they've been assigned the "Caterpillar Room" for wild abusive toddlers, and Lotso is the Godfatheresque overlord of the daycare. Once Woody learns the true horrors of Sunnyside, he must infiltrate the daycare and somehow get his friends out.

You know that the movie industry is officially in a slump when the cleverest, funniest and most touching movie of the summer... is a CGI sequel about toys. "Toy Story 3" starts off rather lightweight at first, with the toys being brought into Sunnyside and Woody setting off in another direction.

But once Lotso is revealed as the villain, the movie takes a sharp turn -- it becomes a clever, complex "Great Escape"-style caper, with some moments of G-rated horror (THE MONKEY!) and hilarity (resetting Buzz ends up turning him into a flamenco-dancing suave Spaniard). And while the toys' attempted escape from Sunnyside is taut and genuinely thrilling, it's only the START of the climax -- a harrowing, genuinely scary chase scene that brings the toys together.

And there's a bittersweet core to "Toy Story 3": kids grow up, leave home and the people/toys they leave behind are both proud and sad. In the final scenes of the movie,we're quietly ushered through the emotional goodbyes and hellos of growing up.

And the adorable little cast of toys still remind us that what matters most is love and loyalty, particularly during a deadly crisis where they all fearfully join hands (it sounds sappy, but it isn't). There's also some endearing additions to the cast -- the foppish clotheshorse Ken, Big Baby, a Totoro, a giggly tricerotops, and the Shakespearean stuffed hedgehog Mr. Pricklepants.

Anyway, this blu-ray/DVD combo has a wealth of extras -- trailers teasers, theatrical shorts (oh look, Night and Day are scuffling!), "Cine-emplore," commentary, lots of making-ofs, behind the scenes stuff like "A Toy's Eye View: Creating A Whole New Land," a music video, and just lots of endearing odds and ends like Ken's dating tips. Er...

It hurts to say goodbye to Woody, Buzz and their friends, but "Toy Story 3" is a fitting farewell that brings the trilogy full circle. Best movie of the summer, hands down.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on March 2, 2012
My family LOVED this movie, but our kids are 14 and 17 - as always in Disney fashion, lots of funny stuff for the adults, lots of funny stuff for the kids. Glad my kids aren't little, though, the crazed dollbaby freaked even my husband out! There were some big "monster" types in this one, so I wouldn't recommend for toddlers.... Enjoy!
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
"Toy Story" was about sibling rivalry. "Toy Story 2" was about loving others, even if it means you might get hurt someday.

So what is "Toy Story 3" about? It takes the whole "kids + loyal toys" theme to its natural conclusion, by showing us what happens when the kids grow up and leave. While the first two-thirds of the movie are fairly pedestrian (for a Pixar movie!), the last part is both action-packed and emotionally wrenching.

Ten years have passed, and Andy is now a college-bound teenager. His toys are anxious about what's going to happen, so Woody keeps assuring them that they'll be put safely in the attic. But a misunderstanding leads to a date with the garbage truck. Since the toys believe they have been abandoned, they jump into the box of donated toys bound for Sunnyside Daycare.

They're greeted by the genial Lots-o'-Hugging Bear (aka Lotso) and the friendly daycare toys, and all seems to be well. But Andy's toys soon discover that Sunnyside is a nighmare -- they've been assigned the "Caterpillar Room" for wild abusive toddlers, and Lotso is the Godfatheresque overlord of the daycare. Once Woody learns the true horrors of Sunnyside, he must infiltrate the daycare and somehow get his friends out.

You know that the movie industry is officially in a slump when the cleverest, funniest and most touching movie of the summer... is a CGI sequel about toys. "Toy Story 3" starts off rather lightweight at first, with the toys being brought into Sunnyside and Woody setting off in another direction.

But once Lotso is revealed as the villain, the movie takes a sharp turn -- it becomes a clever, complex "Great Escape"-style caper, with some moments of G-rated horror (THE MONKEY!) and hilarity (resetting Buzz ends up turning him into a flamenco-dancing suave Spaniard). And while the toys' attempted escape from Sunnyside is taut and genuinely thrilling, it's only the START of the climax -- a harrowing, genuinely scary chase scene that brings the toys together.

And there's a bittersweet core to "Toy Story 3": kids grow up, leave home and the people/toys they leave behind are both proud and sad. In the final scenes of the movie,we're quietly ushered through the emotional goodbyes and hellos of growing up.

And the adorable little cast of toys still remind us that what matters most is love and loyalty, particularly during a deadly crisis where they all fearfully join hands (it sounds sappy, but it isn't). There's also some endearing additions to the cast -- the foppish clotheshorse Ken, Big Baby, a Totoro, a giggly tricerotops, and the Shakespearean stuffed hedgehog Mr. Pricklepants.

It hurts to say goodbye to Woody, Buzz and their friends, but "Toy Story 3" is a fitting farewell that brings the trilogy full circle. Best movie of the summer, hands down.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
When the original Toy Story came out in 1995, I wanted to see it just because it was the first computer animated movie. But I left the theater in love with all things Pixar. They haven't let me down yet, but I will admit I was a little worried about Toy Story 3 since sequels don't usually hold up. I don't know why I was worried; this is Pixar. The movie is wonderful.

Time has passed for our friends in Andy's room, and Andy (still voiced by John Morris) is getting ready to go to college. Woody (Tom Hanks), Buzz (Tim Allen), and the gang that is left haven't been played with in ages. Some of our friends have even left at yard sales over the years.

Andy is trying to figure out what to do with the toys he still has when, through a misunderstanding, they think he has thrown them away. They quickly donate themselves to the Sunnyside Day Care Center. While they are thrilled at the prospect of being played with again, the center has a dark side, too. Will they survive their new home? Will they ever learn that Andy wasn't trying to throw them away?

The movie starts right out with play time that reminds us of the first two movies. I had a smile on my face within minutes. And that smile continued as the movie progressed.

Yes, this is a comedy, and I was laughing pretty hard at some of the scenes. In fact, I would guess that the adults were laughing more than the kids. The scenes between Ken (Michael Keaton) and Barbie (Jodi Benson) were hysterical. Plus there's what happens to Buzz (if you've seen the trailers, you know what I'm talking about). And 10 points to anyone who can catch the Scooby Doo reference.

But I was also caught up in the story. Things got bogged down for a few minutes in the middle, but it wasn't long before I was fully caught up in the story again. The climax wasn't quite as complex as some of Pixar's climaxes-that-will-not-quit have been in the past, it did still provide several unforeseen complications that kept me on the edge of my seat. That is when I wasn't laughing at how they worked something from the very first movie into the climax.

The voice cast was wonderful once again. While Andy is still a minor character, I love the fact that they still used John Morris for his voice. The only actor they changed was Blake Clark who took over for his friend, the late Jim Varney, as Slinky Dog. It was only after the movie was over that I questioned just how much Slinky said, but when he was talking, I never noticed a difference in the actor's voice.

There were times I missed the ensemble characters who were written out of the film. Fortunately, the movie got going quickly and moved at such a steady pace that I didn't have time to mourn their loss for long. Plus we get a lot of great new characters who do help fill things out.

One reason sequels can disappoint is because they will just re-dress the same plot from the first movie. While a few of the plot elements here did feel recycled, I always felt like we were watching something that was a truly new effort. The themes definitely felt recycled, although they did continue to build on them here like they did in the first sequel. Some retreading is bound to happen, but I felt like they did a good job of keeping it to a minimum and instead building on what we have already seen.

What was not recycled was the animation. You can definitely tell a difference between the first and second movie. Well, that's nothing compared to how things look here. The humans look so much better than the first one. There are only a couple of shots that will blow you away (and I didn't watch it in 3D), but it all looked great to me.

Parents might want to know that a couple of scenes get intense and might frighten young kids. The one sitting next to me didn't seem to have any problems, but you can judge your kids best. They also have a very small part with sub-titles. That seems a bit strange to me for a movie aimed at kids, but I can't complain too loudly since I was laughing so hard at those parts.

Which brings us to the ending. I'm not going to give anything away, don't worry. All I want to say is it is very bittersweet. A friend who saw it opening night recommended bring tissue. I wish I had listened to him. This grown man had very wet eyes by the time it was over, but I wouldn't have changed a thing. It was absolutely perfect.

As much as I have loved these characters, I do hope they stop here. We've had a great ride, but this one provides some good closure. I feel like Toy Story 3 brings things full circle. I know I'll be watching it many more times to come.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on January 28, 2011
To wish that a movie is the last in the franchise sounds somewhat negative. However, the story arc and resolution of Toy Story 3 is so poignant and effective that it can't be followed by a new story. In short, the plot centres around a college-bound Andy who has outgrown his toys - Woody, Buzz, Rex, Ham, etc. In a series of misunderstandings, they all end up at a daycare centre. This is all pretty lightweight stuff so far, and not very interesting. When they get to the daycare, however, the plot thickens as they discover it is run by a big Strawberry-scented bear named Lotso who runs the place like a banana-republic dictatorship. Andy's toys are banished to the room with the youngest children who proceed to misuse them dreadfully (e.g. using Jesse's hair as a paintbrush).

Many people have compared the film to the Great Escape, and indeed the best part of the movie involves the elaborate plan to break out of Sunnyside Daycare. It also borrows somewhat from Bridge on the River Kwai, with Buzz collaborating (after being factory-reset) with Lotso's crew, and Woody, having escaped, returning to help his friends' cause. This is the point where the screenwriters show their cleverness - Pixar films always work best when the stories don't simply set a human story being played by toys (or animals or cars) but where the solutions grow organically from the properties of the toys themselves. Hence, Mr. Potato Head uses the fact that his parts still work when detached from the potato to great effect. Barbie uses Ken's metrosexuality as a weapon against him to extract vital information from him. And when Buzz is re-reset and ends up in Spanish mode.... well, that is sheer brilliance. Their Oscar nomination for Best Adapted Story is well-earned.

This is clearly the most emotionally loaded Toy Story, and is very intense at the end. Certainly, my 5-year old was okay watching it, but my 3-year old was scared and refuses to watch the end parts. That gives you an indication of the level of intensity if you plan to but this for younger children. I don't think it's giving anything away to say there is a happy ending, but perhaps not the one you'd expect (yes, Andy goes to college and the toys do not accompany him). Luckily, the end credits provide a very important (and funny) wrapup to let you end on a smile. (In fact, I can't think of a more effective use of a song at the end of a film, except possibly "Always Look On the Bright Side of Life" at the end of Monty Python's Life of Brian.)

Ultimately, this film may endear itself to me as my favourite Toy Story. I'm not ready to make that decision yet (having only watched it 4 or 5 times), but it's certainly the equal of the first two films in the franchise. I bought the DVD version (because Disney Blu-rays drive me nuts!), and there are some neat extras, certainly enough for me without an entire 2nd disc of extras like in the 3-disc Blu-ray set.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on June 19, 2010
I have been looking forward to a third installment in the Toy Story series ever since the second film came out. The first two films were funny, endearing, and original masterpieces, and I could only hope and pray that A. they would make a third, and that B. it would be at least half as good as the first two. Well bless those geniuses at Pixar, they went for a third movie with our favs from the toy box, and they gave us a film that can proudly stand alongside the first two. Some of the original toys are missing in this one, and a moment near the beginning settles the fate of those missing toys, but the main characters are here, and most of them are freaking now that Andy is about to start college. Gloom, doom and despair, they're headed for the attic, or worse, the land-fill. Due to a mix-up, the toys find themsleves donated to a day-care, which is what you would think that toys would consider heaven. It turns out to be just the opposite, and that's when the interesting stuff really starts. The pace is kept tight, with only a slight drag here and there, with lots of adult nods and winks, and laughs galore. The animation is superb, as is usual with Pixar. I am of the very firm opinion that Pixar is the real and true home of the computer animated film, and all others are just wanna-bees ( yes, even the Shrek series). How Pixar continues to turn out quality film after quality film each and every time is amazing. As I said, the pace is good, and gets more intense towards the end. Actually, I noted several people squirmed a bit in a key part in the land-fill, so the intensity was a bit surprising. However, the ending was pure magic. There is a fine line between heavy-handed sentimentality and pulling the heart strings enough to get a reaction, and Pixar has it down pat. The ending is just right, and leaves the door open for a possible fourth film (which would be GREAT). All in all, this movie kind of surprised me. I knew I'd like it, but it was better than it had to be. That's another thing Pixar is good at.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
I am your twenty something viewer who grew up with Toy Story loving it. I was the one, among many, who felt, "finally, a movie that captures the wonder of a child!" The creativity was miraculous, and over the years we have had the sequel to relish in, as it was a true sequel, not a dissapointment. And, perhaps, we would allow Pixar room to make one "average" movie, but no, they create the masterpiece simply called Toy Story 3. Nothing fancy, that's it, and I can't think of any better way. The business side is done, here's all the hard work in the movie.

And Toy Story 3 has some enviable characters once again. Andy has not suddenly become the monster that he had feared, or the spoiled brat of a teenager that does not grasp the humanity within. No, Andy has grown up to become Jesus in my eyes. I'll try not to give spoilers, He must be somehow aware that Woody and the gang have feelings, or else he has such a heart, that even toys, without soul, without life, he humanizes and treats with dignity. Imagine the good deads this young man will do that are left to our imaginations. I think people register this well and the altruism is felt.

I would not rate this movie higher than Toy Story as it is more sentimental for me. I grew up with that film and Toy Story 3 is new. This is a kids movie and kids do seem to love Toy Story 3. But saying that, Kids like me have grown up since the first and are coming to see this and are also enjoying it. Toy Story 3 doesn't seem to have better graphics than the second, and I'm sure that's the point. It retains the style that we identify with.

This is a movie, that so many will enjoy with flawless happiness and without fault. Not everyone will approach it as the innocent movie for a younger audience, and might hold it in an inappropriate light. Some might spite all the reasons that have been unanimous, because of the seemingly unreproachable Pixar having so little resistance to criticism. No matter though, I am confident that all will find this movie to be enjoyable on some level.

Pixar can't be touched, not even by a few reviwers on Rotten Tomatoes with seeming vendettas. Awards are something special for the fans and for the talented cast and crew and I'm sure Toy Story 3 will reap in its harvast of gold statuettes. But I can't help but think now, that there was much more they could have done. I thought if would have been artistically rewarding to push the limits a little harder. I know they are being true to the spirit of Toy Story-with its simpleness, but I put forth that maybe a little experimentation such as a dream scene of the toys in which the creators could have had freedom to make something artistic.

Note: I saw this on premier weekend at the theater of my town.
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