Story Proof: The Science Behind the Startling Power of Story and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$24.00
Qty:1
  • List Price: $35.00
  • Save: $11.00 (31%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Usually ships within 2 to 3 weeks.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Trade in your item
Get a $9.14
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Story Proof: The Science Behind the Startling Power of Story Paperback – October 30, 2007

ISBN-13: 978-1591585466 ISBN-10: 1591585465

Buy New
Price: $24.00
31 New from $24.00 13 Used from $20.01 1 Collectible from $29.88
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$24.00
$24.00 $20.01
Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Frequently Bought Together

Story Proof: The Science Behind the Startling Power of Story + Wired for Story: The Writer's Guide to Using Brain Science to Hook Readers from the Very First Sentence
Price for both: $37.49

One of these items ships sooner than the other.

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Save up to 90% on Textbooks
Rent textbooks, buy textbooks, or get up to 80% back when you sell us your books. Shop Now

Product Details

  • Paperback: 164 pages
  • Publisher: Libraries Unlimited (October 30, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1591585465
  • ISBN-13: 978-1591585466
  • Product Dimensions: 10 x 6.9 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #306,012 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

The mind-boggling and extraordinary truth is that each and every one of these thousands of original sources agrees with the general premise that stories are effective. Story Proof offers proof positive that stories work.



"We have been hearing recently about the trend away from narrative fiction as the choice of a new generation….Haven comes at us with the most articulate defense of story as an essential element in education….He looks at the tradition and examines the research behind story to make his major point that we cannot ignore this genre and that we do so at the peril of effective teaching and powerful teaching strategies….In the face of drill-and-kill reading programs, Haven reminds us that story can be and is as powerful as ever. Bottom line: This is a good read. A powerful reminder. Thanks, Kendall."

-

Teacher Librarian

Book Description

Like Stephen Krashen's important work in the Power of Reading, Kendall Haven's Story Proof collects and analyzes the research which validates the importance of story, story reading and storytelling to the brain development and education of children and adults.


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
5
4 star
1
3 star
3
2 star
3
1 star
0
See all 12 customer reviews
It's incredibly well researched, and very well written.
James A. Signorelli
If you're interested in story and narratives and why we frame things the way that we do, and you want to know why we do those things, this book will tell you.
Gregg Morris
So far I am very frustrated with the book because of the repetition.
Adriana

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By James A. Signorelli on March 8, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
StoryBranding(TM) 2.0: Creating Standout Brands Through the Purpose of StoryThe subject of stories has received a great deal of attention as of late. But upon close analysis the word 'story' is quite fuzzy and has many meanings. What is a story really? Something with a beginning, middle and end? A white lie? A news report? You'd be surprised at what can be found out just researching this question, which is what Kendall Haven did for 10 years while writing this book.

This is THE book about stories, what they are and why they are so powerful. No other comes close. If you have even the slightest interest in story as a tool to enhance communication to persuade, engage audiences, or just to entertain, this is not only a must read, it should be a first read. I refer to it often and probably will for a long time. It's incredibly well researched, and very well written. Chapter one is worth the entire price of the book and then some.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Merin on March 28, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This was a required text for my Storytelling class, and I have to say, it wasn't a favorite by any means. I found parts of this to be awfully dry in places, particularly chapter nine when the author is relating the findings of all these different studies, and terribly technical when he's talking about how the brain processes stories. I also felt like the purpose of this book was kind of a "preaching to the choir" for me personally, because I obviously feel storytelling and stories are important, or I would a) be working with kids b) want to be a Youth Services librarian or c) be taking this course. I feel like the general gist of this book could have been achieved for the purpose of this class by simply reading some articles.

That being said, here's what the author was trying to get across: stories have the power to catch your attention and draw you in. They are easier to comprehend than other types of nonfiction/technical writing, and by exposing children to stories, you're setting them up for an easier time of it in school when it comes time for them to start writing. Stories even translate to higher math/science skills. When people use stories to teach their main concepts, the people listening pick up the main ideas and details more easily, and can more readily recall them. Storytelling = Good. So, in a nutshell, here's a one line sentence to sum up this book: Read to your kids!

A NOTE ON THE KINDLE FORMAT: I wanted to give a heads-up that the Kindle edition of this title has some serious formatting issues, particularly in chapter nine with the placement of the little blurbs in boxes that recount a main idea. They're scattered throughout the chapter, sometimes before the actual text appeared in the book. There are also weird line breaks and spacing issues, so if this is something that will potentially bother you, pick up the print edition and skip the Kindle.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By BeeOasis on August 7, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
"Story Proof is a great book, deserving to be read by masses of people. . . "

Tea time was over. I looked out the window of the common room down on Buccleuch Street. The sky, streets, and buildings of Edinburgh were gray again like the clouds. Then Simon spoke up, "Back to work boys!" One by one we stood up and shuffled for the door. As we headed out, I spoke to my professor. I had to get something off my chest. "Jim," I said, "I'm having a hard time. . . getting my head around the book you asked me to read."

I waited a bit anxiously for his response. He looked at me, smiled, and said, "Well, reading a book sometimes is like hitting yourself over the head with a book." I laughed and promised that I would keep trying. The material was complex and new to me, but it also was dull and poorly written. Besides learning about communication theory, I was learning that some of the brightest academics in the world are bad writers.

Joseph Williams' great book, "Style: Toward Clarity and Grace" tells us in clear and almost scientific terms what makes for bad writing and how we can improve it. The clear and graceful style tightly defined by Williams actually decreases stress placed on short-term memory, thus helping us parse sentences more easily. Any writer, especially academics, can benefit greatly from the sage advice of Joseph Williams.

But style, clarity, and grace may not be enough. What is missing? According to Kendall Haven, story is missing, and Haven's book, "Story Proof" convincingly demonstrates that story is the essential element of good writing. And this is not just for fiction. Haven claims that we can "storify" expository prose, arguments, and scientific discourse. And by so doing, we can make our writing more interesting and more memorable.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Easy Writer on February 6, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I'm interested in the brain science of storytelling and so was excited to learn about this book. And I was encouraged to read the opening chapters where the author correctly discusses the need for a better definition of story and a more complete understanding of why it's so effective and when to use it.

But with each chapter, I found the book was simply not very good. For instance, chapter 9, which supposedly summarizes the vast research on storytelling, simply quotes different researchers who say vague things like "story is the foundation of all human understanding" and "story facilitates social connections." No data given to back this up. Just paragraph after paragraph of other people's quotes. Although the bibliography contains all the source research, which presumably I must now look up and read on my own.

The brain science is interesting but woefully incomplete. It suffers from the same problem as chapter 9; vague rhetorical assertions that we are "hard-wired from birth to respond to story". That as infants we recognize faces (hero), can direct our gaze to where others are pointing (goal), can infer cause-effect relationships (outcome). There are better books that account for the brain science behind story, such as the chemical dopamine is released when we listen to story.

The book's biggest failing is how it blithely asserts EVERTHING can be (is best) converted to story, but it doesn't tell us HOW to convert facts into story. For instance, if I'm an engineer talking to other engineers about a new technology, where is the hero of that story? What is the conflict? It's not a simple matter to convert a list of important facts into a narrative arc. The author never addresses this.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews