Stranded

March 14, 2000 | Format: MP3

$5.99
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: March 14, 2000
  • Release Date: March 14, 2000
  • Label: Eg Records
  • Copyright: (C) 1999 Virgin Records LtdThis label copy information is the subject of copyright protection. All rights reserved.(C) 1999 Virgin Records Ltd
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 41:06
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B000TEPD8G
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (56 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #13,089 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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See all 56 customer reviews
This is simply the best Roxy album ever.
youknowsit, clart!
This "new" Roxy Music have basically the same style but Ferry's songwriting/lyrics are far more clearly defined and as well as their general concept.
Andre S. Grindle
I'm sure there's even somebody out there who loves "Just Like You".
JR Dunn

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

52 of 56 people found the following review helpful By B. Kemper VINE VOICE on March 16, 2005
Format: Audio CD
Back in the day, I was working the graveyard shift at a radio station in Minneapolis. Waaaaaay in the back of the record library was a dusty stack of LPs never meant to see the light of day. Most of it was junk, but this record caught my attention (the photo of the beautiful woman in the torn dress is an attention-getter), and I put it on the turntable. I could not believe such creative musicians existed (other than King Crimson, but I digress). The ultimate irony is that, right next to this disc was the first Foreigner album. So there they were, the record that represented everything I hated about commercial pop music (Foreigner), and this Roxy album which was like finding a starlit path to heaven. I immediately became addicted and started buying recordings by Roxy, Bryan Ferry, Brian Eno, Phil Manzanera, etc. etc.....everything I could get my hands on. This is talent. This is music. Ten zillion Foreigner albums are not worth the ink on the record label of this disc. Buy it. It is a mind-bending, fully original classic.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By (KKC) M. S. Artaxerxes Dionysus on January 8, 2006
Format: Audio CD
Roxy Music is one of those groups, where everybody has their own opinion of which album is the best, because they never made a record not worth buying ('Flesh + Blood' is vastly underrated). But this is my personal favourite, because every track here is simply perfect, & it ties the group together, both with the experimental group they were before Eno's departure just before this album. And at the same time, it has most of what makes the later 'Country Life' and 'Siren' such classic albums. And then it has 'Street Life'...

'Street Life', that opens the album, is simply Roxy's greatest song ever (some of the romantic ballads are as good, but you can't compare them). This song is pure joy from start to end, with Ferry manically unleashing some of his strongest lyrics ever. The music is a feverish, ecstatic festival for youth & life. It is a party anthem that never gets dumb, old or clichéed, because the imagery here is nothing short of sorcery! Romantic sorcerer, that is what Ferry is here. Or drunken god... but what's the difference? This song is worth the world alone...

'Just Like You' is a tender ballad of the kind that Ferry does a million of, without it getting repetitive. 'Amazona' is an alltime classic, with almost psychedelic lyrics & riff so magical that it sweeps away your feet. 'Psalm' is just that, with traces of gospel, though that's what it's not. 'Serenade' is utter joy, a rolling rocker that somehow retains the romanticism of the earlier songs, while seeing it through the eyes of rock'n'roll.

'A Song For Europe' is a haunting, dark track, reminiscent of Lou Reed's 'Berlin' epic, released the same year, but still not, as it retains Ferry's romanticism.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Wayne Klein HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on March 14, 2000
Format: Audio CD
Stranded shows a more melodic but still ambitious Roxy Music trying on musicial styles. While they don't all fit perfectly, the look is dazzling nonetheless. Stranded is the band's first true collaborative effort from start to finish. The first album was primarily written before the final line up was assembled. The second clearly had much input (although a dimished role for him) from Eno. Stranded features Ferry to the fore and clearly the front man while still very much a collaborative effort.
The surprising Mother of Pearl (the first Ferry song where he improvised the lyrics while listening to the playback for the very first time), wistful A Song for Europe and reverent Psalm all capture Roxy's topsy turvy world in transition. While Stranded isn't as odd as For YOur Pleasure or rock as hard as COuntry Life, the melodic sheen of these well crafted songs stand out in comparison to those efforts.
Eno's favorite Roxy album is Stranded.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Jay Murphy on August 24, 2006
Format: Audio CD
From the opening dissonant synthesizer riff, Phil Manzanera's alternately 'walking' and shrieking guitar lines slithering through it and Bryan Ferry's excited crooning in "Street Life" to the gorgeous poetry and subtle piano/violin interplay at the end of "Sunset", this is my favorite Roxy Music album. The wild "Street Life" is followed by "Just Like You", a luscious ballad with astoundingly dreamy/surrealistic lyrics Ferry mostly sings in a sweet falsetto. Then out of left field (way,way out!) comes the Ferry/Manzanera-composed "Amazona"- partly funky, partly spacey, totally unique. I love Phil's treated guitar solo on this one. The marching rhythm of "Psalm" features a strange lyrical analogy of trying on different clothes with seeking religious faith. "Serenade" features some wonderful oboe and sax work by Andy Mackay. Next is the towering "A Song For Europe", an ode to the Olde Country that veers from the majestic to the subtle and back again. The astonishingly original "Mother of Pearl" starts off like a schizophrenic rocker ("Have you a future? Yes,yes,yes, nooo!"), transforms into a semi-ballad after a little over a minute and slowly starts rocking again after a bit. "Mother" segues right into the final track, "Sunset", a song so beautiful, so melancholy yet serene that I cried the first few times I listened to it. Again, here Bryan's lyrics are unparalleled in their subtlety and wit. ("Sunburst fingers you raise, one last sigh of farewell".) Glorious!

Before continuing, I have to tell you that I worship at the alter of Brian Eno. He's probably the biggest influence on my own songwriting. But is he missed on "Stranded"? My answer is a resounding 'no'. The replacement of Brian with Eddie Jobson was a good move.
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