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Strange Days Indeed: The 1970s: The Golden Days of Paranoia Hardcover


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 352 pages
  • Publisher: PublicAffairs; 1 edition (March 2, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1586488457
  • ISBN-13: 978-1586488451
  • Product Dimensions: 6.4 x 9.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (44 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #900,777 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

*Starred Review* Like the 1960s, the 1970s were more of a concept than a specific 10-year period. If the ’60s were defined by the sexual revolution and civil-rights activism, the ’70s’ central theme, Wheen suggests, was paranoia. World leaders such as U.S. president Nixon and British prime ministers Heath and Wilson were well known for delusional and sometimes irrational behavior; writers such as Philip K. Dick and Norman Mailer published works that displayed a troubling paranoia (OK, Mailer was right, and the FBI really was spying on him, but nobody knew that for certain until 30-odd years later). American cinemas were full of movies with themes of paranoia: The Conversation, The Parallax View, even Jaws. In the movies, the paranoia is justified because the fears are legitimate: there really is a government conspiracy, and the politicos of Amity really are willing to sacrifice people’s lives to keep the beaches open. Oh, and let’s not forget Watergate, Jonestown, and the cold war. The 1970s provide a rich panorama of paranoia, and Wheen explores it gleefully, writing about its “pungent mélange of apocalyptic dread and conspiratorial fever” and pointing out how, no matter how surreal the decade seems in retrospect, there are startling moments of familiarity and déja vu (when you think about it, our world today is not so different). A hugely entertaining book that makes you laugh, think, and look over your shoulder—sometimes all at the same time. --David Pitt

Review

Kirkus
“The author ably navigates the shattered landscape of the decade, which, for all its awfulness, has inspired a fair share of nostalgia…Literate, authentic to period detail and often entertaining.”

Booklist, STARRED review
“A hugely entertaining book that makes you laugh, think, and look over your shoulder—sometimes all at the same time.”

Publishers Weekly
“[W]riting like Hunter S. Thompson might have had he been English and sober, Wheen offers a vivid, entertaining guide to an era of fear and loathing.”

The New Republic
“Wheen slathers his prose with cleverness so cheerily that you could almost forget that this was the decade of Nixon’s air war and the Khmer Rouge.”

The Los Angeles Times
“[Strange Days Indeed] frames the 1970s as an era of institutional collapse, unstable officials, general irrationalism (widespread interest in UFOs, psychic phenomena, mad cults) and terror: the Irish Republican Army's bombing campaign in Britain, the Black September massacre at the Munich Olympics, the Zippy the Pinhead antics of the Baader-Meinhof Gang, and the Symbionese Liberation Army.”
 
CHOICE Magazine, January 2011
“A must read…highly recommended.”

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Customer Reviews

All in all not a bad read but I do think there are much better ones out there!
R. C Sheehy
(And he really rushes through his account of Watergate - the narrative is a bit too compressed).
Nowhere Man
If you want to read about the paranoia that went with it this is the book for you.
scesq

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer VINE VOICE on May 27, 2010
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Strange Days Indeed won't give you the full view of the 70's and its implications for the future, but in cherry picking some of the weirdest examples of a transitional time, it helps to shed light on some of the weirder events happening in a decade at the tail end of the cold war, a cultural revolution, and before the dawn of the personal computer.

Were the '70's unique in their paranoia...I don't know, but it seems right to me that paranoia would occur in a decade where a a general shedding of self confidence was occurring in the "developed" world. Madness in politics and political leaders is, unfortunately, not a hallmark of this decade, the media spotlight on it was new, the immediacy of the far corners of the world and the entrance into the private conversations, the bedrooms of the worlds of political leaders was entirely new. And Francis Wheen has chosen examples of this madness to intrigue and edify those of us who have a taste for this sort of thing.

It's a fun book, perhaps not meant to be taken overly seriously, which will provide some insights into the less known British events that defined the decade in that corner of Europe.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By R. W. Rasband VINE VOICE on July 24, 2010
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
"Strange Days Indeed" is a history of the 1970's in the unmistakably satiric style of the venerable British magazine "Private Eye" (the author is an editor there.) It attempts to catch between two covers the weird vibe of that time. This book is exceptionally readable and amusing. Wheen is admirably even-handed with the left and right in flashing his skewer. The chapters on the West (Nixon, Great Britain, Philip K. Dick) are fascinating and even manage to dredge up some new insight into these familiar subjects. It's the chapters on real evil (Mao, Idi Amin, terrorism, espionage, Soviet tyranny) that give me a little pause. Here the humor gets blacker, as real blood is spilled. Worth reading for the reminder that, for the cases of the innocent people who suffered from political evil during this dark crazy time, they had real enemies.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By David Segrove VINE VOICE on September 23, 2010
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This was a bit of a misnomer, unless you're familiar with Anglo-American history of the 70s. There was a lot going on in the world, and a lot of interesting and unusual people. While this book does touch on many of the things we associate with the 70s, trends, obscure dictators, the Cold War, Watergate, etc, it does literally "touch" on the wider picture. It is very much about Great Britain in the 1970s and the incredible turmoil the country was going through including the shortened work week, strikes galore, terror attacks and more.

Of course, there was the American dram of President Nixon and Watergate, Jimmy Carter and the Iranian Hostage Crisis, Vietnam, etc, and these too are covered in good detail, but there was the rest of the world and I felt as though Mr Ween tended to ignore these except for vague references or glossing over them. It's not as though he had too much information, the book is only 352 pages long.

That said, it's an alright read to pass the time. It's not among the best I've read, and I consider myself fortunate to be sufficiently versed in Anglo-American history that I "got" it. For the novice, I'm not so sure.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Avid Reviewer TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on September 29, 2010
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
It seems quaint that Wheen should pick paranoia as a defining characteristic for the 70's and proceeds with relating a mishmash of historical events that involve everything from political intriques (such as the Watergate scandal) to conspiracy theories (relating to subject matter such as FDR's foreknowledge of the bombing of Pearl Harbor, the Illuminati, the Bilderberg Group, etc.) -- events that purportedly fomented a climate of paranoia in both the political arena and the populace at large.

Some of the political figures Wheen writes about are most notably Richard Nixon, Idi Amin, Harold Wilson, and Mao Zedong. A disproportionately large part of the book talks about the political happenings in Britain at the time.

You might enjoy the book if you want to relive some of your memories of the 70's. Personally, I really enjoyed Wheen's dry humor and extraordinarily pungent wit. Overall, I found the book quite readable but only mildly interesting. There was nothing in the book that particularly drew me in.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A. Tegtmeier VINE VOICE on March 4, 2010
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
The theme of this book is the widespread paranoia that seems to be one of the main features of the 1970s. Paranoia about sex and pornography, paranoia of the mighty towards the population, paranoia of terrorists against society, paranoia of society towards long hair - you name it, he's got it.
The book also ventures into such shady topics as mercenaries who topple African dictators - it is literally all over the place.
Most entertaining are the stories about Tricky Dick Nixon - a madman par excellence and a true inspiration for every aspiring crook.
About half of the book is devoted to the British (who are all these people?) and their struggle with life in the 70s - before Punk cleared the air and Maggie Thatcher straightened them out again.
The single stories are very entertaining, but there is no real rhythm, no real flow. It is just a conglomerate of oddities and strange occurrences. Plus, it is tedious to read at times. And that is just not enough to warrant more than an average rating.
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