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Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde and Other Tales (Oxford World's Classics) Paperback


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Product Details

  • Series: Oxford World's Classics
  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA (July 15, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0199536228
  • ISBN-13: 978-0199536221
  • Product Dimensions: 7.6 x 5 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #88,681 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

The best edition of Stevenson's supernatural fiction so far. The texts are very well edited, the notes are significant and unobtrusive for the average reader, and the appendices provide the perfect complementation for Stevenson's narratives of the uncanny. Roger Luckhurst's introduction is fascinating. A must. Dr. Antonio Ballesteros-Gonzalez, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha

About the Author

Robert Louis Balfour Stevenson (1850-1894), was a Scottish novelist, poet, essayist and travel writer.

More About the Author

Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894) was a novelist, poet, short-story writer, and essayist. In 1883, while bedridden with tuberculosis, he wrote what would become one of the best known and most beloved collections of children's poetry in the English language, A Child's Garden of Verses. Block City is taken from that collection. Stevenson is also the author of such classics as Treasure Island, Kidnapped, and The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.

Customer Reviews

3.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By NHshopper on August 18, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
I was was familiar with Kidnapped, Treasure Island and of course The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde however I was not aware the latter was only a short novella. By reading this book I was introduced to a RLS I did not know existed. He was a writer of many short stories included herein, all of a romantic nature, very similar in style to Edgar Alan Poe though not as macabre was Poe, who interestingly enough was born after RLS. Reading this book gave me the idea that perhaps Poe was influenced to some degree be the writings of RLS. I enjoyed this book of short stories and was left wanting more.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jennifer Grey on December 27, 2012
Format: Paperback
Everyone knows the story, or at least they think they do. But as is the case with much classic literature that enters into popular consciousness, much gets lost or forgotten or shockingly misremembered (I'm looking at you, Wuthering Heights, and your freakish misinterpretation as a love story!) Stevenson's tale is both more and less than you probably recall it being, far more reliant on frames within frames in a way that makes you wonder if he wasn't a long-lost Bronte sister and with much less overt in its depictions of evil.

There are many theories regarding the latter and the possible implications Stevenson's apparent timidity: that he was eliding obvious references to homosexuality, or possibly child prostitution, a major scandal over which happened during the time he was writing. I personally think Stevenson left Hyde's perversions deliberately opaque as a way of demonstrating the duality of nature even in his reader, for each of us supplies from some dark corner of our being suggestions as to what the infamous Hyde could have been up to, suggestions all the more disturbing for coming solely within ourselves.

This particular edition includes several other tales that further illustrate Stevenson's fascination with duality and evil, as well as an essay, "A Gossip on Romance" that should be required reading for anyone enrolled in a creative writing MFA program. Rather than seeming extraneous, the extras add to the enjoyment of Stevenson's classic, as does the excellent introduction by Luckhurst, which makes getting to know this particular tale all over again an utter delight.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The copy I got was an illustrated children's book completely different from the actual novel. Completely useless. Might as well download the ebook for free.
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Format: Paperback
Atty. Mr. Utterson is worried, as the keeper of Dr Henry Jekyll's will. The will gives everything to Edward Hyde incase of Henry's death or disappearance. Mr. Utterson met the hideous Hyde once and does not trust him. Well it looks like Henry's will will have to be executed as the housekeeper; Mr. Pool thinks Hyde hid Henry's body.

Once again, I saw Spencer Tracy before I read the book, so I was anticipating a different type of story. I read "Treasure Island" so I am familiar with Stevenson's writing style but I did not realize that this story was more of a mystery that draws the conclusion and revelation in the end. The explanation of man and his duel personality is excellent and I suspect he draws on personal experience.

I also read the kindle version. It was sparse and strait forward; there was not a lot of fluff and speculation from other personalities. I made sure that the text-to speech was activated before purchasing. This helped but I had to keep reminding myself that the names were mispronounced.

Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde Double Feature (1932/1941)
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1 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Lauren Magnussen on October 19, 2008
Format: Paperback
"I who sicken and freeze at the mere thought of him...when I know how he fears my power to cut him off by suicide, I find it in my heart to pity him." This quote comes at the end of the novella, when the crux of Stevenson's point comes to a head. It is at this point when madness and reason - the forms of Hyde and Jekyll, respectively - are completely separated, and Hyde threatens to completely overtake Jekyll. It is in this last chapter that the core philosophy is revealed in all of its stunning originality. Leading up to this moment however, is an almost unremarkable detective story with stock characterizations. Albeit the imagery gives a foreboding tone ("The fog still slept on the wing above the drowned city, where the lamps glittered like carbuncles") and the narrative moves by briskly, the text as a whole isn't particularly remarkable. Truly, it is the last chapter that stands out the most, and the reader is finally able to get a glimpse of the pure evil that the story has been leading up to. Vague on details yet astute on human psychology, Stevenson has created a tale that resonates in its concept, not in its literary abilities.
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