Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Strangely Like War: The Global Assault on Forests (Politics of the Living Books) Paperback – October 1, 2003


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$6.29 $0.31

Best Books of the Year
See the Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Series: Politics of the Living Books
  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Chelsea Green; First Edition edition (October 1, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1931498458
  • ISBN-13: 978-1931498456
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.4 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,161,864 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Jensen (The Culture of Make Believe) and Draffan (A Primer on Corporate Power) are both pessimistic and angry about the state of the world's forests. In the U.S. only five percent of native forest remains; forests on a global level are also under attack, with one estimate claiming that two and a half acres are cut every second. International deforestation causes the extinction of plants and animals in addition to driving human forest dwellers, like the Karen of Burma, the Mapuche of Chile and the Penan of Malaysia, from their homelands. The destruction of forests also results in flooding, erosion and landslides. Production of paper products releases highly toxic chemicals into both the air and water. The authors provide many instances of collusion between industry and government, which has led to a U.S. commercial timber and logging industry permitted to destroy forests almost without restriction. Environmental agencies such as the Sierra Club or the Environmental Defense Fund, according to Jensen and Draffan, are more interested in raising money than in raising discomfort among the economically powerful. Globalization, they argue, is a network of financial, legal and political structures that operate for the benefit of the economic elite, allowing those in power to consume the natural resources of other nations. Although the text is occasionally overwrought, the authors have carefully documented worldwide deforestation, as well as the serious environmental and human consequences, and point a finger at those responsible.
Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Review

Must reading for anyone concerned with either the fate of future generations or, indeed, the planet itself. -- Ward Churchill, author of Struggle for the Land and A Little Matter of Genocide

Strangely Like War exposes the crisis of the large-scale destruction of the world’s forests ... this significant work is highly recommended. -- Library Journal, November 1, 2003

Thank you, Jensen and Draffan. You awaken our hearts and common sense at the same time. -- Frances Moore Lappe, co-author of Hope's Edge: The Next Diet for a Small Planet

[Derrick Jensen's] analysis of our culture’s predilection for hatred and destruction will rattle your bones. -- Daniel Quinn, author of Ishmael

[The authors] open our eyes to the terrorist assault on our living guardians and the destruction of our real security. -- from the foreword by Vandana Shiva

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

This book is a must read for anyone that cares.
Give Me Something I Can Use
Jensen and Draffan helped me see and truly comprehend the pain and suffering our planet's forests and all of their inhabitants are experiencing.
Nita Crabb
This book covers the worldwide forest crisis and how that impacts everyone from the most endangered species to the drinking water in your home.
"bridbee33"

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

34 of 36 people found the following review helpful By Huby7 on December 16, 2003
Format: Paperback
Like the reviewer before me I'm going to post Jensen and Draffan's challenge on page 6. "The truth lies on the ground. Go out and walk the clearcuts for yourself. Rub the dried soil between your fingertips. Walk the dying streams; listen to the silence in the skies (except for the whine of chainsaws and roar of distant logging trucks). Walk among ancient ones still standing, trees sometimes two thousand years old. Put your hands on their bark, on their skin. Taste the difference in the air. Smell it. Reflect on the beauty of what's still there, and on what has been lost--what has been taken from us."
I've walked many clear cuts. I used to be a logger. I was the "good german" who followed orders put forth by my foreman, county forester, state forester, and the corporations (Louisiana Pacific, Georgia Pacific, Potlach, Johnson Timber...etc) telling me which trees to cut and how much. The management practices that I followed didn't make much sense to me than, and REALLY don't make sense to me now after reading Jensen's, Strangely Like War: The Global Assault On Forests.
When I first started logging I was led to believe that I was actually "improving" the forests by cutting down trees that were going to die anyway. Or I was creating "habitat" for Whitetail Deer and Ruffed Tailed Grouse. Or I was helping out our economy and contributing to society. All "claims to virtue" that Jensen and Draffan debunk in Strangely Like War. Jensen also debunks the claims in his other works. The fact of the matter is that the forests aren't being managed with the diversity of wildlife as the management plans first priority. The forests are being managed for the optimum production of the desired species set forth by the transnational corporations who want them.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
27 of 29 people found the following review helpful By J.W.K on December 28, 2003
Format: Paperback
A concisely worded, hard-hitting, well-researched book, Strangely Like War reveals the obscured and absurd connection between rabid consumption, relentlessly extractive industrial forestry, and the consequent genocide of those who are pushed from the land to which they belong. Already well-versed in this subject, authors Draffan and Jensen have provided us with a sobering expose of global deforestation, the political corruption that aids and abets it, and a stirring portrait of various indigenous peoples who have suffered (and still suffer) genocide as a result. Arguing from a position outside strict environmentalism, Strangely Like War levels a broader critique of globalization: "this parasitic, monetized, commodity-driven, inequitable, monocultural socioeconomic system", sometimes referred to simply as Western Civilization (altho geography no longer has anything to do with it). Along side everything else Jensen has every written, this book is a soulfully critical masterpiece that should not be overlooked.
A MUST READ
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By "bridbee33" on January 28, 2004
Format: Paperback
I am impressed with how concise, clear, and well researched this book is. I have bought it for all of my friends and I recommend it to forest activists everywhere. This book covers the worldwide forest crisis and how that impacts everyone from the most endangered species to the drinking water in your home. It also covers the entire history of deforestation from the rise of civilization in the Middle East through the present day. The authors' directness and honesty are refreshing. Most writers who pretend to be confronting these problems shy away from spelling out the connections between the corporations and those in government that not only allow but also encourage the destruction to continue. Thank you Jensen and Draffan for this beautifully written tool for forest education!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Glenna Green on December 11, 2004
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I am struck by the other reviews of this important book: The reviewers from the West coast (who are watching the forests fall) give it high marks, while the mid-west reviewers (where the forests fell long ago) are more concerned with the tone of the book. I invite those midwesterners to come visit their western woods while some still remain. Then reread this book and see if you can share some of that anger.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
16 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Mimi Mills on December 23, 2003
Format: Paperback
In our profit-driven consuming culture, where it is fair to say that most people have "Gone to Sleep", authors of the newly released, Strangely Like War, Derrick Jensen, and George Draffan, scrutinize a widely held concept and statement in the first paragraph guaranteed to wake you up, "Gone Extinct. Such a passive way to put it, as though we know no cause, can assign no responsibility." A brilliant opening, that arouses questions of responsibility we would be unwise, or mulish to ignore. There is a synergistic relation between planetary and personal well being; that the needs of the one are relevant to the other. And Jensen and Draffan, explicitly detail the relevance in a superb and courageous undertaking of the severe and consequently destructive myths of the transnational timber industry when this fundamental premise is ignored.
As the authors state in their book, "The problem is not and has never been a lack of accounting methodologies or industrial know-how; the problems are denial, recalcitrance, and apathy. The solution isn't technical, but political. The solution isn't even political but social. The solution isn't even social but psychological. The solution isn't even psychological but perceptual. The solution isn't even perceptual but spiritual. The problem is our entire way of living and relating to the world."
I highly recommend this startling and fact-driven book; it will impel you to action, and simultaneously rouse a fire in your heart to make a difference.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?