Strangers On A Train 1951 PG CC

Amazon Instant Video

(223) IMDb 8.1/10
Available in HD

Hitchcock's super-thriller about two passengers who meet accidentally and plot to "exchange" murders,a tennis star who wants out of his marriage.

Starring:
Farley Granger, Ruth Roman
Runtime:
1 hour 41 minutes

Available in HD on supported devices.

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Strangers On A Train

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Strangers on a Train (Two-Disc Special Edition)

Price: $17.29

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Product Details

Genres Thriller
Director Alfred Hitchcock
Starring Farley Granger, Ruth Roman
Supporting actors Robert Walker, Leo G. Carroll, Patricia Hitchcock, Kasey Rogers, Marion Lorne, Jonathan Hale, Howard St. John, John Brown, Norma Varden, Robert Gist, Joel Allen, Murray Alper, Monya Andre, Brooks Benedict, Al Bridge, John Butler, Leonard Carey, Edward Clark
Studio Warner Bros.
MPAA rating PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 24 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

This is a movie that has great acting and lots of suspense.
CLC
The film is one of Hitchcock's most entertaining and suspensful outings.
Bluebird
Along with Rear Window, this film is Hitchcock at his best!
Damian P. Gadal

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

94 of 108 people found the following review helpful By Edward on July 11, 2000
Format: VHS Tape
"Strangers on a Train" is that rarity, an Alfred Hitchcock film concerning which one talks about an actor's performance almost as much as the director's. The actor, of course, is Robert Walker, presenting his remarkable portrayal of Bruno Anthony, the rich, unstable man who offers the hero Guy Haines a deadly proposition: he'll kill Guy's wife Miriam (played by the interesting Laura Elliott) if Guy will kill Bruno's father. Because they are strangers on a train who do not know their intended victims, there will be no motives, therefore perfect alibis. Guy doesn't take Bruno seriously, which turns out to be a fatal mistake. Bruno is a complicated part. Although he is obssessed with his own superiority, he can be incredibly petty (popping a little boy's balloon just for the meanness of it), not to mention prissy ("I'm afraid I don't know what a `smoocher' is!"). The character seems to overshadow the entire movie, which is appropriate, because Bruno casts a shadow over the easy, affluent world in which he lives. When he crashes the senator's cocktail party, it's like Satan has arrived, striding through polite society. And, no, Walker was not nominated for an Oscar. Neither was Joseph Cotten for "Shadow of a Doubt". Neither was Anthony Perkins for "Psycho". The Academy evidently had difficulty with Hitchcock's anti-heroes. Hitchcock originally wanted William Holden for the role of Guy Haines, but I think Holden was so savvy and macho, it would have been difficult to accept him as a psycopath's pawn. Farley Granger is atheletic enough to be convincing as a tennis champ, but he has a boyishness which makes the vulnerable aspects of the character believable. The film is filled with the touches one associates with Hitchcock.Read more ›
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57 of 65 people found the following review helpful By JWaite100@aol.com on August 14, 1999
Format: VHS Tape
"Strangers On A Train" should be rated as Hitchcock's absolute best.
To begin with, it features a perfect performance by Robert Walker, an actor who would be dead within a year after making this great movie.
Walker had previously played some wonderful roles, but he astounded the world with his acting ability once "Strangers On A Train" was released.
Aside from Walker's amazing performance, "Strangers On A Train" is full of half-hidden meanings which relate to the dual personality each of us possesses.
Hitchcock was a true genius, who not only understood both the dark and the bright sides of the human psyche, but who also knew how to depict that understanding by way of film.
I have watched "Strangers On A Train" a dozen or more times, and never tire of watching it yet again, each time finding something new that I had not noticed the time I watched it before.
But, the main reason I watch this film so often is to enjoy the exceptional , perfect performance by Robert Walker. Walker was only in his 30s when he died. He was a tragic figure in real life. He died much too soon, and we are very fortunate to be able to observe his wonderful talent, preserved in this movie, almost fifty years after his passing.
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202 of 245 people found the following review helpful By David Kusumoto on January 21, 2000
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
It's important to note two things about this edition of "Strangers on a Train." First off, the description on Amazon.com's page is incorrect. This DVD is not in widescreen. The second thing is, to you widescreen buffs out there (including myself) -- Relax! This film was never shot in widescreen. In fact, prior to 1953 (The Robe), there was never anything bigger than 35mm! This is why this film (and you'll be surprised to hear), many, many classic films will never be produced in widescreen. They don't exist. You should buy this DVD because of the video quality and the extra "goodies." Gone with the Wind in widescreen? Nope, never was, even though it was blown up to 70mm and cropped horribly in the 1968 re-issue. What's out there on DVD on Gone with the Wind is standard 35mm "TV semi-square" framing, because that's the way it was shot. Wizard of Oz, Casablanca, Citizen Kane? Nope, never shot in anything greater than 35mm. It's a Wonderful Life? No again. Widescreen is limited to theatrical films issued for the most part, after 1953, when competition with television forced studios to come up with the "panoramic" gimmicks to bring people back into the theaters. This is period (1953-1963) when Cinemascope, Todd-AO, VistaVision, Super Panavision 70 and other widescreen formats were born -- and the most extreme example was Cinerama, which used three cameras and is used to best effect in the DVD version of How the West Was Won. So don't fret, this DVD is good, crisp and clean and formatted as Alfred Hitchcock intended! Tomorrow's movies will be in IMAX (see Fantasia 2000, in selected theaters now).
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Paul J. Mular TOP 500 REVIEWER on November 1, 2012
Format: Blu-ray
***** = Movie
**** = Blu-ray presentation (because "Preview" version is in Standard Definition.)
This new Blu-ray disc appears to be the same as the 2004 Remastered DVD (orange cover), which was a substantial improvement over the 1997 grainy DVD (blue cover).
So basically if you already have the 2004 Remastered DVD there is little reason to re-buy this on Blu-ray, but it is a must-have if you have the original 1997 grainy DVD.

The increased storage capacity of Blu-ray discs allows both the "final" and "preview" versions of the movie to appear on one disc. HOWEVER, the "preview" version is NOT IN HD, it and all of the documentaries (which are the same as on the old DVDs) are in STANDARD DEFINITION and accessed through the "bonus" button. Not a lot of extra effort was put into this Blu-ray release by Warner Brothers Home Video, no new bonuses.

The 1080p resolution of the "final release" version allows for a little more detail in the pinstripe jackets and night time scenery, even a little better than the 2004 Remastered DVD, but it may not be enough to recommend this for an upgrade unless you own a large screen HD-TV.

Although the "preview" version is only in Standard Definition, it will look a little better if only because of no DVD compression. On most standard size HD-TVs it will look the same.

The story is classic Hitchcock, two strangers who have someone they don't like meet on a train, one gets a wild morbid idea on how to solve their problems. Do they get away with it?
Outside of the "eyeglasses" and "Love Tunnel" scenes, visually this film does not have the Hitchcock style, the camera set-ups seem to be pretty standard. It looks nice but not memorable.
Read more ›
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