Prime Music
Qty:1
& FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
Only 15 left in stock.
Sold by megahitrecords and Fulfilled by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by Utah SKI Gear
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Eligible for FREE Super Saving Shipping! Fast Amazon shipping plus a hassle free return policy mean your satisfaction is guaranteed! Tracking number provided with every order. Slight wear signs otherwise item is in very good condition.
Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Cart
$9.88
& FREE Shipping on orders over $35.00. Details
Sold by: Amazon.com
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • Strangeways Here We Come
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

Strangeways Here We Come


See all 24 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Listen Instantly with Prime Music Prime Members Album
Other Formats & Versions Amazon Price New from Used from
Audio CD, October 25, 1990
$9.62
$5.93 $0.93

Amazon's The Smiths Store

Music

Image of album by The Smiths

Photos

Image of The Smiths

Biography

Biography by Stephen Thomas Erlewine

The Smiths were the definitive British indie rock band of the '80s, marking the end of synth-driven new wave and the beginning of the guitar rock that dominated English rock into the '90s. Sonically, the group was indebted to the British Invasion, crafting ringing, melodic three-minute pop singles, even for their album tracks. But their scope ... Read more in Amazon's The Smiths Store

Visit Amazon's The Smiths Store
for 68 albums, 7 photos, discussions, and more.


Frequently Bought Together

Strangeways Here We Come + The Queen Is Dead [Vinyl]
Price for both: $33.61

One of these items ships sooner than the other.

Buy the selected items together

Product Details

  • Audio CD (October 25, 1990)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Warner Off Roster
  • ASIN: B000002LCX
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (88 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #106,179 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Rush and A Push & The Land Is Ours
2. I Started Something I Couldn't Finish
3. Death Of A Disco Dancer
4. Girlfriend In A Coma
5. Stop Me If You Think You've Heard This One Before
6. Last Night I Dreamt That Somebody Loved Me
7. Unhappy Birthday
8. Paint A Vulgar Picture
9. Death At One's Elbow
10. I Won't Share You

Editorial Reviews

No Description Available
No Track Information Available
Media Type: CD
Artist: SMITHS
Title: STRANGEWAYS HERE WE COME
Street Release Date: 01/01/1987
Domestic
Genre: ROCK/POP

Customer Reviews

This is one of my favorite Smiths songs.
Rich Latta
Still just as wonderful, lyrics still stand "Paint a Vulgar Picture" & "Girlfriend in a Coma" true and funny as ever.
redclay
A MUST HAVE for a Smiths Fan who GETS IT!
Sean Huxter

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

26 of 28 people found the following review helpful By The Groove on October 5, 2002
Format: Audio CD
"Strangeways, Here We Come" is the unexpected swan song of the Smiths, who disbanded in the months following the completion of this album. While it doesn't quite reach the heights of "The Queen is Dead" or their debut, there's enough to remind us why we fell in love with this Manchester group in the first place. Singer Morrissey gives us his twisted sense of humor in the single "Girlfriend in a Coma," makes a nail-on-the-head commentary on the recording industry's greed in "Paint a Vulgar Picture," and delivers a fine closer, the haunting "I Won't Share You." But "Strangeways"'s peak is the potent "Last Night I Dreamt That Somebody Loved Me." After a piano solo that seems to go on forever, the song blasts into a dramatic rocker in which Morrissey moans: "Last night I felt/ real arms around me/ No hope, no harm/ Just another false alarm." With four studio albums within 4 years, The Smiths have secured a place in pop as one of the most beloved and influential groups of all time. "Strangeways" only confirms that belief.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Mike Smith on October 3, 2005
Format: Audio CD
I can't say that this is The Smiths' best album--I can't, because, they have a lot of GREAT albums--but I can say it's my favorite.

"The Queen is Dead" is terrific, but this feels more anthemic, more forceful, alive, and vital.

"Louder than Bombs" is amazing--though many don't even consider it an album, just a compilation--but this feels more focused, directed, and much tighter.

"The Smiths," their first album is experimental and fun and jubilant and dark, but this is the work of a mature band that's seen too much and that, although they're bummed out about things, can't take it all too seriously anymore.

"Strangeways, Here We Come" is an amazing collection of songs. From lyrics like, "And the pain was enough to make a shy, bald, buddhist reflect and plan a mass murder," to a conflicted love song to a girlfriend in a coma, to an amazing, self-referential song about the record industry, lyrically Morrissey had never been better.

And musically, the songs are driving, haunting, deep...and even catchy. It's almost wrong to call this "Eighties music," because it has almost nothing in common with the Thomas Dolbys and the Duran Durans that once cluttered up the airwaves. This was music written ahead of its time, and music that's good anytime: depressing, enlivening, uplifting, thought provoking.

These songs got me through adolescense, and then they just stuck around. I don't think they'll ever leave me, and at this point, I don't want them to.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Sean Huxter on March 3, 2000
Format: Audio CD
"Paint a Vulgar Picture" is as powerful a piece of art about the shallowness of the recording industry as you will EVER hear. It is poignant and serious, depicting the vulgar greed of record company executives as they eagerly plot to exploit the death of one of their stars. Sick and funny at the same time, as are most of the Smiths' songs. It even makes a topical reference to "You Just Haven't Earned It Yet, Baby." A masterpiece!
Then just to show how you just CAN'T take them too seriously, listen to "Girlfriend in a Coma" and just SEE if you can keep a straight face. The peppy, upbeat music belies the morbid seriousness of a girlfriend placed in a coma by an obviously violent man who is secretly hoping she will die. Black humor at its best.
And "Unhappy Birthday" is a classic! "I've come to wish you an unhappy birthday/because you're evil and you lie/and if you should die/I may feel slightly sad/but I won't cry." Beautiful!
A MUST HAVE for a Smiths Fan who GETS IT!
Sean.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Sakos on April 13, 2005
Format: Audio CD
While the popular consensus is that The Queen Is Dead was their masterpiece, I tend to find Strangeways their finest studio achievement, which unfortunately was followed by the breakup of the band after the recording was complete (but before the album was released). How daring is it that the opening number, the great A Rush and a Push and the Land is Ours, contains not one bit of guitar? Or the overlooked masterpiece Death of a Disco Dancer, where the band fires on all cylinders and Morrissey delivers some of his wryest and best lyrics to date? Stop Me If You Think You've Heard This One Before is awesome, and if Last Night I Dreamed That Somebody Loved Me doesn't tug at your heart, from the eerie intro to the pleading performances from all 4 band members, then something is wrong with you. Bitterness and sadness drip from Unhappy Birthday, which is often overlooked in The Smiths' canon of work. Even the final track, I won't share you, which is simply Marr on autoharp and Morrissey singing with a little bass from Rourke, is pure perfection. As is the album (with the exception of one song, the lame Death At One's Elbow).
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Blake Maddux on March 13, 2005
Format: Audio CD
"Strangeways, Here We Come" brought an end to what is probably the most remarkable 4½-year, organically whole recording career in the history of popular music. The Smiths were wise to not try to follow up "The Queen Is Dead" with "Our Greatest Masterpiece, Part II". However, since they probably did not know that it was to be their last new album, "Strangeways" has the feel of a transitional record, much like "Meat Is Murder". But while "Meat Is Murder" would have ended the band's career (not that it threatened to) with something of a whimper, "Strangeways" ends it with a bang.

The cliché of the "sophomore slump" has been too much of a reality for some artists . The Smiths managed to eschew this with "Hatful of Hallow", which, though it was more of a collection than a proper studio album, contained some of the the band's greatest material. Following what might be called a "junior slump", The Smiths delivered their masterpiece, "The Queen Is Dead". Having leap-froged the sophomore slump, they were now back at square two, so to speak. Following up a masterpiece can be as arduous as delivering on the promise of a great debut. Although a masterpiece gives a band some room to maneuver, it also sets a high standard to live up to. This what The Smiths faced as they entered the studio for what was to be their final recording together.

"Strangeways" turned out to be a Janus-faced record. The band tried to move forward with more ornate production, but they generally ended up sounding better when they stuck to what had always worked for them. The longer and shorter songs sit comfortable among one another, even if the longer songs can feel too long at times.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Look for Similar Items by Category

megahitrecords Privacy Statement megahitrecords Shipping Information megahitrecords Returns & Exchanges