Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for up to $1.10
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • Strauss - Salome / Jessye Norman · Morris · Witt · Raffeiner · Leech · Staatskapelle Dresden · Ozawa
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

Strauss - Salome / Jessye Norman · Morris · Witt · Raffeiner · Leech · Staatskapelle Dresden · Ozawa Import


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Audio CD, Import, August 23, 1994
"Please retry"
$75.90 $11.97

Disc: 1
1. Salome: Scene One - Wie schon ist die prinzessin Salome heute nacht
2. Salome: Scene One - Nach mir wird einer kommen
3. Salome: Scene Two - Ich will nicht bleiben
4. Salome: Scene Two - Siehe, der Herr ist gekommen
5. Salome: Scene Two - Jauchze nicht, du land Palästina
6. Salome: Scene Two - Du wirst das für mich tun
7. Salome: Scene Three - Wo ist er, dessen sündenbecher jetzt voll ist?
8. Salome: Scene Three - Er ist schrecklich
9. Salome: Scene Three - Wer ist dies weib, das mich ansieht?
10. Salome: Scene Three - Jochanaan! Ich bin verliebt in deinen leib
See all 21 tracks on this disc
Disc: 2
1. Salome: Scene Four - Salomes Tanz der sieben schleier
2. Salome: Scene Four - Ah! Herrlich! Wundervoll, wundervoll!
3. Salome: Scene Four - Salome, ich beschwore dich
4. Salome: Scene Four - Salome, bedenk, was du tun willst
5. Salome: Scene Four - Man soll ihr geben, was sie verlangt
6. Salome: Scene Four - Es ist kein Laut zu vernehmen
7. Salome: Scene Four - Ah! Du wolltest mich nicht deien Mund kussen lassen
8. Salome: Scene Four - Sie ist ein Ungeheuer, deine Tochter
9. Salome: Scene Four - Ah! Ich habe deinen Mund gekubt, Jochanaan

Product Details

  • Performer: Richard Strauss, Seiji Ozawa, Jessye Norman, Walter Raffeiner, Richard Leech, James Morris Kerstin Witt
  • Audio CD (August 23, 1994)
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Polygram Classics
  • ASIN: B00000413H
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #286,205 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By JPH on August 27, 2003
I am a big fan of Richard Strauss's tone poems, and thus the opening bars of this recording thrilled me to bits because what I heard were the magical, authentically Straussian tones of the great Dresden Staatskapelle - the orchestra which has the most intimate associations with the composer himself. But thereafter the thrill gradually fades away. Simply having the premier Richard Strauss orchestra in a Strauss opera recording is no barometer of ultimate success when the conductor and most of the cast are not up to the task. It is wonderful to hear the magisterial voices of Ms Norman and Mr Morris in the important roles, but their efforts are seriously undermined by the poor casting in the smaller, but vital roles, and by the inappropriate direction of Ozawa. Instead of offering a superbly played music drama to rival great versions by Sinopoli and Solti, Ozawa treats this score as if it were a Tchaikovsky ballet (with a severed head instead, no doubt). The only outstanding part of this recording which overtakes its other rivals is in the passage where Salome holds up John's head. Here, the great Dresden Staatkapelle revealed the dance elements in the bars following this moment. No other CD version had revealed this insight to me before. A startling moment of orchestral playing.

However, that is just about all. Ultimately, this is a recording which promised much on paper, but failed to deliver the goods. All fluff and no bite. However great Norman here is, she cannot do much to save this opera set when everything else is collapsing around her.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By wayne pannabecker on August 11, 2002
Yes, Norman produces gallons of wonderful, jaw-dropping, voluminous tone and her technique, range, and German language-familiarity are welcome also. She's the kind of listener who can command attention and one we want to listen to; nevertheless, it sounds more like Elektra than Salome to me. When is she going to undertake Brunnhilde, by the way?
Ozawa's conducting is straightfoward with good attention to detail but somewhat neutral rhythmically.
The cast is capable with the exception of the Herod (Walter Raffeiner) who speaks, moans, grunts, and shouts more than he does sing. If his voice were prettier, it might be more listenable, but it's ugly, strained, and imperfectly controlled. He, in fact, makes a singer like Gerhard Stoltz who is famous for sprechstimme and campy performances sound like vocal gold by comparison. (Stolz can be heard as Herod on Solti's set with Nilsson.) James Morris as Jokanaan and Richard Leech as Narraboth make vivid and pleasing additions to the cast, but the rest (Dresden regulars) are just adequate--they don't shame the performance, but they sure aren't world class either.
The three star rating is mostly for Norman's contribution.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Mick McAllister on May 8, 2009
I'm sure there are many much worse recordings of Salome, but for sheer disappointment, this one is hard to beat. I've listened to five Salomes in the last two weeks, and this one is so bad it's embarrassing. The cast is utterly wrong, except for the excellent James Morris (but I'm prejudiced, because I saw him perform Jochanaan at Santa Fe). The orchestra is listless and muddy. The Herod and Herodias don't do much except contribute noise.

But worst, and most unforgivable, is the "casting" of Jessye Norman as Salome. Not only is her voice itself wrong (she comes across as a mature Turandot, not an out-of-control nymphet), but her interpretation of Salome is completely superficial and wrong-headed. Playing Salome as a nasty adult decadent is to miss every justifiable interpretation of the operatic role, however faithful it may be to Wilde's misogynistic fantasy.

What is unforgivable is that there are hints all over this recording that it was a vanity piece. What could Philips have owed Norman, that they would finance this abomination? There is the vanity of the casting, with a stable of non-entities backing up the Divine Ms. N and her Carmenesque voice assigned a role she is no more suitable for than she would be to sing Chinese opera. There is the telling note at the end of the "think piece" on the opera indicating that it was "edited" by Ms. Norman.
Read more ›
4 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Ralph Moore TOP 500 REVIEWER on March 11, 2014
I have a dozen recordings of "Salome", one of my favourite operas but this one stymied me because it's such a mixture of the admirable, the puzzling and the downright poor.

Let's start with the Salome herself. I am full of praise for the tonal variety and range of colour Jessye Norman brings to her characterisation of the teenage "Ungeheuer". She can wheedle, cajole, affect naïveté, lighten her big tone delicately then call on ringing power and generally encompass every emotional nuance to depict Salome; her vocal acting before the apparition of the Baptist's head is a tour de force and in many ways hers is the most successful impersonation I know. There is no stately restraint here; she takes risks and throws herself into the part in a way that she could not do on stage owing to her physical limitations of build. Her top notes shine and her lower register is trenchant without her ever sounding matronly.

Similarly, I love Richard Leech's Narraboth, which is youthful, ardent and mellifluous, fully conveying his hopeless obsession with the poisonous princess. Kerstin Witt's big, hard-voiced Herodias is powerfully vocalised and suitably scornful.

The supporting cast is generally mediocre but my main reservations centre on the Herod, the Jochanaan and Ozawa's conducting. The Dresden Staatskapelle is mellow and melodious but sometimes the direction is so slack as to sound enervating, undercutting the tension at key moments and turning Salome's dance into a faintly titillating sashay instead of the orgy it should be. The playing aspires to grandeur but is often dull and dutiful, in the worst Ozawa mode, eschewing thrills.

About the Herod, sung by the (to me, unknown) hoarse-voiced tenor Walter Raffeiner, opinions are divided.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Look for Similar Items by Category