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The Wall Street Journal. Complete Retirement Guidebook: How to Plan It, Live It and Enjoy It Paperback – June 12, 2007

ISBN-13: 978-0307350992 ISBN-10: 0307350991

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Three Rivers Press (June 12, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0307350991
  • ISBN-13: 978-0307350992
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 5.1 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 2.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (37 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #380,379 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

Be prepared should now be the boomers' slogan for the upcoming wide world of retirement—and for the stampede of how-to books. Two seasoned journalists, both of whom regularly cover retirement topics, team to produce a warm and friendly guide to the art and science of this new lifestyle. What is featured here? A bunch of personal stories that will resonate with readers. There's Chicago couple Pam and Larry Satek, who planned a new career as winery owners; former baseball great Nolan Ryan, who, through fits and starts, found his new space; and Judge Herb Folkman, whose second career led to Hollywood. Other topics, from money to relocation, echo those found elsewhere. A healthy dose of informative sidebars, whether listing Web sites that help check financial advisors' backgrounds or answering questions on combatting age discrimination questions, add value. As promised, true windows into the best lives yet to come. Jacobs, Barbara

About the Author

GLENN RUFFENACH developed and now edits “Encore,” The Wall Street Journal’s bimonthly guide to retirement planning and living.

KELLY GREENE has covered retirement planning since 2001 as a staff reporter at The Wall Street Journal, where she works for “Encore” and writes a weekly retirement column.

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Customer Reviews

Maybe these two should become reacquainted with the library and how to do research.
readsalotofbooks
The book suggests that we consider not stopping work or starting to work again in retirement and/or delaying social security benefits.
George Fulmore
While you may semi-believe their self-serving biased advice in the Journal, this is just too much.
The King

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

93 of 110 people found the following review helpful By George Fulmore on July 24, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
In the pharmaceutical world, there are "me too" drugs, which are brought to market by companies that want part of the action for a particular type of best-selling drug. The purpose of the new offering is not to bring something better to the market, or to bring something cheaper to the market, the purpose is to gain some market share of an already existing market.

This may be the primary reason behind the publication of this new book. Kiplinger's has had a book out there for more than a decade. It covers essentially the same ground. I'm sure that there are other books in this same survey category that I am not familiar with. The point is that this book turns out, at best, to be a "me too" book for the Journal.

But, what if that were not the case, and this book were to be judged on its own merit? Then what? An early question could be who is the book written for? My experience tells me that once folks are retired a year or so, they are past the point of seeking retirement advice from a book. The Kiplinger's book says that its focus is on ages 50-65 and for those who are "in or out of the workplace." This sounds like the audience is mostly pre-retirees. With that in mind, let's look at this new book, itself.

We're told that the book addresses "both money and time." Wisely, the "time" section come first; otherwise, like so many other high-level books on retirement, the financials might end up with more space than they should in the overall effort. At least the "time" section has a chance to shine if it goes first.

Unfortunately, the time section is not much of an "upper." Instead, it is filled with warning and negatives and much of the stuff that reinforces any anxiety someone might have about retirement before reading the book.
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57 of 68 people found the following review helpful By Kevin G. Salwen on June 12, 2007
Format: Paperback
Ruffenach and Greene have been writing about retirement issues for the WSJ for nearly a decade -- and this book reflects their deep knowledge of the subject. They realize how much retirement has changed in the last generation (this ain't your father's retirement) and their book is a great combination of the nuts and bolts stuff you need to know and the stories that make this a highly readable piece of journalism. So many retirement books focus on nothing but the financial aspects -- put away X dollars, buy this annuity, how to do a reverse mortgage, blah blah -- but Ruffenach and Greene have added the important elements of "Live It and Enjoy It." The result is worth adding to any bookshelf for people 40 - 80.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By C. E. Hudson on October 20, 2011
Format: Paperback
I normally don't write book reviews, but am submitting this one because of the multiple negative reviews from people claiming to be financial advisors who gave the book low ratings, but do not provide specifics.

Context: I'm comfortably retired at 50 and an advanced investor. I also am estate manager for my mother, age 78. My spouse and I have already secured our retirement finances using a target of living financially secure up to age 100. Currently I am engaged in a home relocation study for our next life-phase of 55-75.

After reading most of the book, I agree with Diane Witt's comment that The New Retirement: Revised and Updated: The Ultimate Guide to the Rest of Your Life provides a broader look at retirement issues. It definitely provides a more detailed look at home relocation issues and opportunities. I also agree with other reviewers that it's not a "feel-good" book, but more of a business book in tone, discussing both retirement successes & failures.

However, the review comments about the financial advice being bad are total nonsense. The book provides a good overview of options and strategies, many of which I've used to preserve my mother's wealth (e.g. The 4% safe withdrawal rule), and does so in simple terms understandable to a person starting their own retirement planning. The section "Assets & Buckets" provides a good layman's overview of a central theme of
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14 of 19 people found the following review helpful By J. Barber on September 7, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I hoped for a stronger content from the authors of The Wall Street Journal, but you can throw this one onto the heap of self help books that get bogged down by inane stories of lucky people. If I were the editor, I could have paired this book down to about 25 pages by just cutting out the fluff. Perhaps the folks at WSJ need to go back to journalism school to remind themselves of how to simplify the content.
Once I finally dug out the "golden nuggets" of wisdom, I was left with the feeling that I have heard it all before. Nothing earth shattering happening here. Nothing you could not discover free by heading over to the hundreds of web sites that deal with money and planning.
All in all, if you want to spend three hours reading about people doing things greater and more profitable than you, this is the book for you.
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