Qty:1
  • List Price: $29.95
  • Save: $8.44 (28%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Acceptable | Details
Sold by jubileebooks
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: A brown tea stain at the top edges of jacket and across the top, outside edge. A little underlining and several margin notes in text. Still an acceptable study copy, but a study copy only.
Add to Cart
Trade in your item
Get a $2.00
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 11 images

The Wall Street Journal Guide to Information Graphics: The Dos and Don'ts of Presenting Data, Facts, and Figures Hardcover – January 4, 2010


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$21.51
$13.98 $8.31

Frequently Bought Together

The Wall Street Journal Guide to Information Graphics: The Dos and Don'ts of Presenting Data, Facts, and Figures + Show Me the Numbers: Designing Tables and Graphs to Enlighten + Visualize This: The FlowingData Guide to Design, Visualization, and Statistics
Price for all three: $74.01

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 160 pages
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company; 1St Edition edition (January 4, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0393072959
  • ISBN-13: 978-0393072952
  • Product Dimensions: 9.5 x 7.4 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (36 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #90,593 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“An essential reference for anyone who needs to effectively convey quantitative information using graphs. Everyone will learn something from reading this book.” (Joseph Tracy, executive vice president and director of research, Federal Reserve Bank of New York)

“Dona Wong’s outstanding new book artfully blends lessons on data analysis and graphic design. She shows us how to make our complex, confusing graphs and presentations both simple and powerful.” (Peter Tufano, Coleman Professor of Financial Management, Harvard Business School)

“We live in an increasingly data-driven world, and Dona Wong does a masterful job of explaining how to make data come alive and tell the truth in an engaging way.” (Mark Zandi, chief economist, Moody’s Economy.com)

“Dona Wong’s professional advice advances the art of information graphics.” (Gene Zelazny, director of visual communications, McKinsey & Company) --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

From the Back Cover

Advance Praise for The Wall Street Journal Guide to Information Graphics:

“An essential reference for anyone who needs to effectively convey quantitative information using graphs. Everyone will learn something from reading this book.”—Joseph Tracy, executive vice president and director of research, Federal Reserve Bank of New York

“We live in an increasingly data-driven world, and Dona Wong does a masterful job of explaining how to make data come alive and tell the truth in an engaging way.”—Mark Zandi, chief economist, Moody’s Economy.com

“Dona Wong’s professional advice advances the art of information graphics.”—Gene Zelazny, director of visual communications, McKinsey & Company

“Software has made it wonderfully easy to produce graphs and charts to illustrate everything from your company’s capital expenditures to your daughter’s science project. Trouble is, the software won’t stop you from making bad graphics. This book will.”—Paul Steiger, editor in chief of ProPublica, former managing editor of The Wall Street Journal

“Dona Wong’s outstanding new book artfully blends lessons on data analysis and graphic design. She shows us how to make our complex, confusing graphs and presentations both simple and powerful.”—Peter Tufano, Sylvan C. Coleman Professor of Financial Management, Harvard Business School

“An invaluable tool for people from all walks of life—not just designers. Dona Wong has created a practical, clearly illustrated guide that demonstrates information design principles and techniques through numerous dos and don’ts.”—Alan Siegel, chairman and CEO, Siegel+Gale, and best-selling author of The Wall Street Journal Guide to Understanding Money and Markets

More About the Author

Through two decades of experience in financial graphics, Dona M. Wong has devoted her career to bridging the analytical and the visual world. Wong began her career in visual journalism at The New York Times in the 1990s, where she was the graphics editor of the daily Business, Sunday Business, and Monday Media Business sections. She became the graphics director for The Wall Street Journal in 2001. During her nine-year tenure at The Journal, Wong was responsible for setting the graphics standard for the newspaper, making visual sense of complex data for readers. Wong has a MFA degree from Yale University, where she completed her dissertation on information design with thesis advisor Edward Tufte, a recognized authority on data visualization. Today she is the strategy director for information design at the global consulting firm Siegel+Gale, a pioneer in simplifying customer communications. She lives in New York City.

Customer Reviews

The book is very well laid out, easy to follow, and just makes sense.
G. Withers
I found Wong's book to be an effective primer on information graphics.
Matthew Posey
This book covers a lot of ground without going into excessive detail.
C. Muser

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

54 of 54 people found the following review helpful By I Teach Typing on January 9, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This short easy read is a beautiful introduction to how to make professional graphics. Because the WSJ is featured in the title, I was a bit nervous that the entire book would be focused on visualizing financial data but it has great advice for anyone who needs to visualize numeric data. I really enjoyed it because there is unique advice that adds to other practical books on visualization like Creating More Effective Graphs, and it nicely complements or leads into classics like The Visual Display of Quantitative Information, 2nd edition or Visualizing Data.

The first chapter covers basic issues like how many colors, what colors, how many lines, etc.. The second, which is the bulk of the book, contrasts effective and poor graphics on side by side pages. There is concise useful advice on truncating ranges, breaking axes, using broken bar graphs, how many pie pieces, etc. The advice is beyond simple do or do not break a bar, it discusses how much of a discrepancy in the height of a bar chart merits a break. While other books have advice that ends with "do or do not use some graphics" (like pie charts), this one has great advice on when it makes sense to do things like break graphics into sets of pictures, use broken bars in bar charts, how and when to set scales (so that graphics afford meaningful comparisons) and how to make the best use of pie charts.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Student on February 26, 2010
Format: Hardcover
As a marketing analyst my job involves a great deal of analyzing data and turning that data into meaningful information for directors, vp's, etc. I've read just about every book out there on this subject at some point or another. This one is a definite keeper. The kind of book that you'd want to keep on your desk if creating charts and graphs is something you do regularly. If you follow these principles your presentations will stand out from the crowd.

I am always shocked by the rarity, within corporate America, of the ability to do this well. The fact is that most top tier MBA's that I've worked with still can't get past the default settings in Excel to even figure out how to get rid of the gray backroung on their charts--let alone follow best practices such as those espoused by this book and the work of Edward Tufte and Stephen Few.

Having mentioned Tufte and Few, let me digress for a moment and discuss them.

Edward Tufte is the guru of data visualization and it's important to point out that this book's author, Donna Wong, studied under the master himself, so you know her credentials are top notch. It's like learning kung fu from the guy that was trained by Bruce Lee. Except he skips all the BS and just shows you how to kick ass. Of course, unlike Bruce Lee, Edward Tufte is not dead and as far as I know has never taken on Kareem Abdul-Jabar in a yellow track suit. He still writes and publishes his own work, but it's far more theoretical, and not as user friendly as, this book is.

As for Stephen Few, he is the second biggest name out there when it comes to data visualization best practices.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By G. Withers on January 18, 2010
Format: Hardcover
An excellent set of guidelines for the effective use of graphical information in a document, website, or presentation. The book is very well laid out, easy to follow, and just makes sense.

The book focuses primarily on bar charts and line graphs. I wish the book were longer. It would be great if it covered more types of information graphics, with further criteria on how to select the best graphic for the job.

This is a great companion to Robert L. Harris's Information Graphics. While Harris's book is much more extensive, I feel this book gives better advice for creating clear, effective graphics.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
18 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Lee Featherby on January 12, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
As the Managing Director of an organisatioon that creates high end presentations for clients, as well as train them in the same, we are constantly wrestling with creating infographics that are clear, concise and communicate their message effectively. So, it was with eager anticiaption that I awaited the arrival of Dona Wong's "The Wall Street Journal Guide to Information Graphics" and I must say I was delighted after perusing its content. Rarely do your read a book that crystalises all that can be said in an area of communication in a way that Dona Wong has done in this book.

Written with a style and clarity that reflects her approach to infographics, it provides an outstanding guide to creating visuals that are clear and to the point. The book is itself an example of communicating without excess whilst delivering a message effectively. (If you have every read Edwarde Tufte's seminal books you will appreciate Dona's clarity)

I whole-heartedly recommend this book to anyone who needs to create charts, tables or other figures and believe that Dona Wong takes over from where Tufte finished.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search