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The Wall Street Journal Guide to Investing in the Apocalypse: Make Money by Seeing Opportunity Where Others See Peril Paperback – February 1, 2011

ISBN-13: 978-0062001320 ISBN-10: 0062001329 Edition: Original

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: HarperBusiness; Original edition (February 1, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0062001329
  • ISBN-13: 978-0062001320
  • Product Dimensions: 5.3 x 0.5 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #771,975 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

Disasters happen every day.
Are your investments prepared?

The investor who knows how to anticipate historically significant or earth-shattering events—who is prepared to act when others are frozen with fear—will always have a substantial advantage. By closely analyzing potential global threats and the opportunities they present, The Wall Street Journal Guide to Investing in the Apocalypse offers investors the key to finding a silver lining in almost any cataclysm. Even if the catastrophic does not occur, the strategies here can pay huge dividends even under more mundane circumstances.

The Wall Street Journal Guide to Investing in the Apocalypse provides readers with valuable information for investment success: the ability to see opportunity where others see peril. Whether a global disaster is natural or man-made, environmental or financial, every fearsome scenario contains the seeds of profit for the investor who stays calm and thinks rather than panics and runs.

About the Author

Entrepreneur, investor, writer, and media personality James Altucher is a frequent contributor to The Wall Street Journal, the Financial Times, and other media outlets, and he appears regularly on CNBC, Fox Business, and CNN Radio. He is the author of four books, including Trade Like a Hedge Fund and The Forever Portfolio.



Douglas R. Sease was a reporter and editor for The Wall Street Journal for twenty-six years. He is the author of five books on investing and tax policy and has edited or ghostwritten more than a dozen books on management, finance, government, and foreign business.


More About the Author

James Altucher is a successful entrepreneur, chess master, investor and writer. He has started and run more than 20 companies, and sold several of those businesses for large exits.

He has also run venture capital funds, hedge funds, angel funds, and currently sits on the boards of several companies.

His writing has appeared in most major national media outlets (Wall Street Journal, ABC, Financial Times, Tech Crunch, Forbes, CNBC, etc). His blog has attracted more than 10 million readers since its launch in 2010.

James is a Top Quora Writer and a LinkedIn Influencer.

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Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on September 1, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I thought the book was interesting. It is a pretty easy read, really intended for more beginner investors so if you want to stay away complicated graphs & formulas then this would be a book you would want to read. I've always been fascinated by apocalyptic events and I help people with their finances so maybe that is why I thought this was an interesting book. If you enjoy investing then give it a read.
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88 of 119 people found the following review helpful By Gene Retske on February 10, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I saw this book advertised in the Wall Street Journal and downloaded a sample. I was very impressed with what I saw in the introduction. The author promised to show how to develop effective strategies on investing in the face of calamities and disasters. He promised that he would not just recommend individual stocks, because that would cause the book to become dated quickly.

So, based on this promise, I paid my money and got the entire book. Apparently, who ever wrote the intro never really read the book. Worse yet, if the author of the book also wrote the intro, he forgot what he promised. At any rate, after promising not to just recommend individual stocks, he does just that. Worse yet, he continually recommends a small group of his favorites. There is a lot of verbiage on creating baskets of stock but no details on how to do that.

What put me over the top was his adamant defense of global warming. Whether you believe it or not is irrelevant. To create an investment strategy that discounts the possibility that global warming will not pan out is risky. To recommend an investment strategy that does not allow for the possibility that the tide will turn is irresponsible.

This book was a great disappointment to me, and I suggest you not waste your money buying it, or your time reading it. The author does not deliver serious investment strategy as he promised.
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10 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Bruce Parrish on March 26, 2011
Format: Paperback
I thoroughly enjoyed the book, and made copious notes throughout. This is a book I'll refer to during the inevitable catastrophes. I've been dealing with a difficult investing environment for a couple years, and appreciate a book that explains how to make money when everyone else is selling. James tells the brave investor to Fade-the-Fear. Generally disasters usually aren't that bad, and people from the ordinary investor to the money managers follow the herd and overreact. Generally selling. James lists several inevitable circumstances that will cause wide spread panic, and even specific companies that will profit from these events. I found the book well reasoned, well written, and contains valuable advice, so I gave it 5 stars.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Patrick L Irwin on June 5, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Helpful information on investing under disaster conditions. While most people do not want to profit from another person's misery, money will be made addressing the aftermath and righting the situation or preventing disasters. For example the rebuilding after Sandy. This book gives you some possible companies that will benefit from changing global conditions such as global warming.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
very goodvery good,product was of good value and the quality is also very good, if i need another i will consider this source again
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Casual reader on May 15, 2011
Format: Paperback
Altucher and Sease have done the world a service with this great book. Its an easy to read (and use guide) to how to invest when the world is going to pot.

Its true that to some it may seem unseemly to invest in companies likely to profit in the event of a disaster. It shouldn't be. It's what smart investors have done forever. And who better than a veteran investor (Altucher) and a well-respected financial journalist (Sease)? They written a short snappy book that won't leave your head spinning with financial mumbo jumbo and may leave your better equipped to navigate the investing landscape.

If it still leaves you feeling queezy about say, investing in Caterpillar stock after an earthquake, then you can donate your profits to the relevant charities.
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13 of 20 people found the following review helpful By William Bianco on March 23, 2011
Format: Paperback
The value-added is the deductive perspective ("if X happens, what does it make sense to do") and the underlying premise, that it's possible to be OK and even prosper regardless of what happens tomorrow. The specific investment ideas may or may not work, although they generally make a lot of sense, but more importantly the premise is spot-on and a great way of thinking about the markets and about life. Highly recommended.
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17 of 28 people found the following review helpful By R. Taylor on March 21, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition
...where he meanders from topic to topic with little apparent rhyme or reason...also, his history makes one wonder just how just how successful an investor he has been in the past...he is currently CEO of a company called "Formcap" which trades in the pink sheets for a penny a share and whose assets consist mostly of a miniscule oil/gas lease...and last year he sold all of his investment in something called "Beauty Brands" for a penny a share...and on his blog, he admits to having invested in something called "212 Ventures" which went bankrupt...indeed, I can't find ANY record of successful investing on his part ANYWHERE...allegedly, he is president of "Stockpickr LLC" -- a subsidiary of "thestreet.com" -- and runs a website where people trade stock ideas...obviously, that doesn't lend much credibility to his opinions about investing...I really can't find sufficient data to support giving up time or money for any of his publications...

...I'm adding this about six weeks later...I suggest potential buyers do their own vetting first...I spent quite a bit of time researching the author's background but could find no credible evidence of his ever having managed money, much less having successfully managed money...the best I can find is that he got a degree in computer science...he started graduate work but apparently quit (wikpedia says he has a masters in computer science from Carnigie Mellon but a search of their graduates didn't turn up anything)...he then started a website which he sold to thestreet.com...he then became, basically, a "commentator/pundit" who writes articles that appear on various sites on the web...he has attempted some venture capital type investments with no record of success that I can document...
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