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The Wall Street Journal Lifetime Guide to Money: Strategies for Managing Your Finances Paperback – January 2, 1997


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 602 pages
  • Publisher: Hyperion; 1st edition (January 2, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0786861320
  • ISBN-13: 978-0786861323
  • Product Dimensions: 7.2 x 1.8 x 10.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,834,361 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

This massive guide from the Journal's "Money & Investing" section offers, in distinct units for age groups 20-40, 40-50 and 60-plus, comprehensive advice on a full spectrum of investment choices and family money matters: home and auto buying, taxes, insurance, college costs, debt handling, unemployment survival, employee benefits and retirement funding (including today's often puzzling health-care environment), estate planning?all pretty much in present-day terms, which are of course bound to change. Unlike that of the Beardstown Ladies, who might research their company holdings down to the CEO's sensibly warm socks, the investment advice detailed here?"stick with stocks"?is largely technical, based on what the markets for stocks, bonds and other instruments may do and the pros and cons of transaction procedures, timing and broker relations. Readers zeroing in on their own age group will find?in a friendly if somewhat repetitive text?a diversified personal money program. Money Book Club main selection; BOMC and QPB selections.
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

This useful compendium of financial planning advice is prepared by reporters who contribute to the Wall Street Journal column "Your Money Matters." Each topic of personal financial planning?e.g., real estate, home buying, and investment?is discussed in terms of three age categories. For example, real estate decisions are described from the point of view of individuals in their twenties through thirties, forties through fifties, and beyond sixty. In addition, there is specific discussion of home buying as well as treatment of vacation home and investment real estate decisions. The quality and readability of the information is exceptional in comparison with other financial planning books, for example, Ric Edelman's The Truth About Money (LJ 11/15/96). Buy with the usual caution that the information is likely to become dated by changes in tax laws and investment performance over time.?Joseph Barth, U.S. Military Acad. Lib., West Point, N.Y.
Copyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 25, 1998
Format: Paperback
This book is a great book for folks who are trying to figure out how to start in on planning there finances. Topics include almost anything you may need in life including useful things such as : Insurance analysis(Differnt types and cost), Planing retirement(401k, IRA's etc.),How to pick a financual adviser(If you feel you need one),General sections covering Stocks, bonds etc., Terms,Taxes, Information about purchasing homes & Loans, and Alot more subjects,
The book is broken down into sections depending on you'r age. This has advantages, and some disadvantages - If you end up reading the book from cover to cover (like I did) you will find alot of repeating information. On the other hand, If you are looking for specific information for your age group things are easier to find. Although the book does metion the ROTH IRA, it does not go into detail about the pros and cons, I'm sure this information was not out when the book was written.
The book did not blow me away with alot of tech terms but introduced them and explained each as it was introduced. There are some nice work sheets in the back that I recomend you photo-copy and use the photo-copy, since you will probably be updating them.
If you read this book you will find yourself going back to it time and again. This is one of those books that may change your life. It will give you an idea of where you are and what you should do to try to aquire a secure future.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Thor Vader on November 8, 2001
Format: Paperback
While this film is clearly not for people that have a background in investing, it is an excellent reference for people that are just looking into their financial situations. It is packed with information that is presented in a very basic manner so that anyone can understand it.
The book is divided into different sections ranging from investing and insurance, to estate planning. In each of these sections, the contents are further divided into different phases of people's lives (20-30's, 40-50's, 60'+). This is helpful in allowing one to reflect on their own strategies as well as where they may be headed.
Again, the real strength of this book is how rudimentary it is. It would be a terrible disappointment to anyone that has even a minimal understanding of finance. Thus, if you are seriously considering this book, know that it will be a good refresher if you are rusty, or jumping off point if you have no knowledge.
I was particularly impressed with the discussion on estate planning. I have an advanced background in finance and investing, but nevertheless was able to gleam a pearl or two.
This book makes a great reference as well. I chose to read it cover to cover, but it would have been equally as helpful as a reference book. People with children may even consider purchasing it as a project to go over with their kids. Best of luck.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 20, 2001
Format: Paperback
The book hit upon all common aspects of personal finance with a chapter devoted to each, and did so in stages that correspond to a person's life: 20s-30s, 40s-50s, 60s and beyond. After giving an overview in that format, each aspect was discussed in detail with ideas, things to look at in your own finances, and common pitfalls. Yes, reading it cover to cover, many things were repeated; however, I'm using it now as a reference, looking up only the chapter or subheading I need, and I've found that I don't have to flip back and forth to various pages in other chapters. Each chapter can stand alone, as can each subheading. I moderate a family finance forum, and refer to the book a lot in this way.
One thing I absolutely love about the book are the various checklists, worksheets and tip boxes. I've put some of the calculators on spreadsheets for my own use, and have shared them with other folks who are interested in personal finance.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By T chambers on January 7, 2001
Format: Paperback
Despite being associated with the Wall Street Journal, the group of persons involved in putting together this guide have not a clue how to prepare a comprehensive, understandable, and readable personal finance guide. It is horribly repetitive, and gets way too hung up on obvious, simple concepts (how many times do I need them to remind me to minimize credit card debt, and to avoid spending too much and saving too little?). It is very poorly organized, and the editor should be taken out and strangled for the way he allows so much of the book to be taken over by meandering, verbose paragraphs trying to describe the simplest concepts. It is almost as if they assume everything you have done in your life so far with your finances has been totally brainless, and they need to beat you over the head with it. It is like being lectured by an uncle who doesn't know how to shut up and has had too much to drink.
And to make matters worse, why must they use light green ink throughout the book; this makes it all but impossible to read, except under high-power halogen lamps. It causes extreme eye fatigue, and makes an already unreadable book infuriating. I can't help but wonder what the true connection to the Wall Street Journal must be for such a badly written, poorly edited book such as this, especially when they find the need to resort to a cutesy tactic such as green print throughout (oh, I get it! Money is green, therefore the book is in green print - Ha Ha Ha!)
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