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Street Smarts: Adventures on the Road and in the Markets Hardcover – February 5, 2013


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Street Smarts: Adventures on the Road and in the Markets + A Gift to My Children: A Father's Lessons for Life and Investing + Hot Commodities: How Anyone Can Invest Profitably in the World's Best Market
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Crown Business (February 5, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0307986071
  • ISBN-13: 978-0307986078
  • Product Dimensions: 9.5 x 6.4 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (194 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #48,180 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Buy it. We endorse it absolutely and enthusiastically." -Lou Dobbs, Lou Dobbs Tonight, Fox Business Network, February 7, 2013

“More than his outsized wealth and contempt for those in power, though, it is Rogers' knack for outsized fun that makes him seem worth knowing...Street Smarts shines when it conveys that zest.” -USA Today

"Street Smarts" is another great read from one of the most astute global investors of our time. With wisdom, humor, and amusing antidotes, the Investment Biker recounts his life's experiences in a manner that is as entertaining as it is educational. As an added surprise, readers may find his insight on fatherhood even more valuable than his perspective on history, economics, and the financial markets. –Peter D. Schiff; best-selling author, host of the Peter Schiff Radio Show, and CEO of Euro Pacific Capital, Inc.

"There are almost no investment geniuses. The only ones I know of are Warren E. Buffett and John C. Bogle and Jim Rogers."  –Ben Stein, New York Times
 
“Jim Rogers makes my head hurt.” –Paul Krugman, New York Times

About the Author

JIM ROGERS cofounded the Quantum Fund and retired at age thirty-seven.  Since then he has served as a sometime professor of finance at Columbia University’s business school, and as a media commentator worldwide.  In 2007, he moved his family to Singapore in the belief that the 21st century will be the century of Asia.  Rogers is the author of the bestsellers Investment Biker, Adventure Capitalist, Hot Commodities, A Gift to My Children, and A Bull in China.


More About the Author

Born in 1942, Jim Rogers had his first job at age five, picking up bottles at baseball games. Winning a scholarship to Yale, Rogers was coxswain on the crew. Upon graduation, he attended Balliol College at Oxford. After a stint in the army, he began work on Wall Street. He cofounded the Quantum Fund, a global-investment partnership. During the next ten years, the portfolio gained more than 4,000 percent, while the S&P rose less than 50 percent. Rogers then decided to retire-at age thirty-seven-but he did not remain idle.Continuing to manage his own portfolio, Rogers served as a professor of finance at the Columbia Univer-sity Graduate School of Business and as moderator of The Dreyfus Roundtable on WCBS and The Profit Motive on FNN. At the same time, he laid the groundwork for his lifelong dream, an around-the-world motorcycle trip: more than 100,000 miles across six continents. That journey became the subject of Rogers's first book, Investment Biker (1994), now available from Random House Trade Paperbacks. While laying plans for his Millennium Adventure 1999-2001, he continued as a media commentator at Worth, CNBC, et al., and as a sometime professor.He now contributes to Fox News, Worth, and others as he and Paige eagerly await their first child.

Customer Reviews

If you want to give your kids a good education, make sure they learn Chinese.
John Petralia
Like Great Britain, the United States is sinking - and Singapore, China and other Asian nations are rising.
Robert J. Askey
Jim Rogers conversational style of writing brings the reader into the front seat of his adventures.
Stoyan D Dimitrov

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

179 of 187 people found the following review helpful By John Petralia VINE VOICE on January 21, 2013
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Part memoir, part investment primer, part history lesson, part travelogue, part sermon, Street Smart is all good. For me, it's the best and most coherent of the Jim Rogers trilogy which includes Investment Biker and Adventure Capitalist. I've enjoyed them all. I've also seen him many times on CNBC and before that on FNN. Despite having an annoying and immature need to constantly tell you how smart he is, I still find him a unique character, unpredictable, opinionated, irascible, incisive, and unconventional. Here's just a few paraphrased observations from this book that I found particularly intriguing:
* The US is declining as fast as Asia is rising.
* If you want to give your kids a good education, make sure they learn Chinese.
* The best investment opportunities are in Asia.
* The US spends twice as much on healthcare as the average nation and gets terrible outcomes.
* High healthcare and litigation costs are the major reasons why American carmakers can't compete globally.
* The fourth leading cause of death in the US is hospital infection.
* The US will go the way of Rome, Timbuktu, Morocco, Portugal, Spain and Greece.
* The cure for high prices is high prices.
* Jim Rogers is always two or three years ahead of the curve.
* Because governments are debasing currencies, commodities are the best investment.
* Don't believe government statistics.
* According to government stats, there are more pets in Japan than children.
* The school system in Singapore is far superior to any in the US.
* Marco polo did not have a passport.
* Throughout history, the most prosperous societies have been open ones.
* In the US, the primacy of the individual has become subordinated to the state.
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127 of 143 people found the following review helpful By Peter Matay on February 27, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I expected much more from this book. I expected to learn something new. The book's misleading title suggests useful info to being "street smart." But instead of street smarts, the book is little more than a shallow account of Rogers' life. So, forget about any street smarts.

According to an interview with the Reuters, it took 70 years for Rogers to do the research for this book. But writing about past girlfriends and wives actually makes me actually loath the man. Although Rogers cares about morality and in business (he mentions why he left Soros), he does not seem to have much of morality and virtue in his personal life--a fact he lightly brushes aside by saying something to the effect that "I was never what one might call "good relationship material"".

Or, perhaps, I missed out that this was part of being street-smart...

Street-smarts? The author does not reveal any new secrets to being street smart, instead of constant boasting how others are wrong.

Adventures? Instead of featuring real, life-threatening adventures, such as being held hostage in Congo or buying fake diamonds (which Rogers briefly talked about during one interview) , the book is rife with low key adventures of how to choose your home, refurbish your decor, raise your children, make sure that one educates them properly.

If you follow Jim Rogers's writings closely--as I do--it seems that, while Rogers has perhaps a hundred stories to tell, he has told them all dozens of times in previous interviews. Most of the book is comprised of such recycled stories, often with the same oddities in style that leads one to suspect that this book was cribbed together by a ghost writer.

When Rogers isn't recycling old stories, he is repeating clichés.
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22 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Esteban Ess VINE VOICE on February 5, 2013
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I have to admire Jim Rogers' chutzpah, courage, and adventurous spirit as well as his success in the financial world. But, I was not expecting to have to listen to him repeatedly tell the reader about how smart he is and what a wonderful life he and his family are living in Singapore. The book is sort of like having dinner with someone who regales you with their "war stories" and list of successes. After a while, the reader gets worn down unless you like to read self indulgent prose. I would like this book a little better if Mr. Rogers would tell more of the facts about the success of China. Yes, the Chinese people work very hard. Yes, the people are capitalistic and business driven in the extreme. Even the street corner food cart operator with a small, two stool cart, works his or her butt off and finds ways to leverage up their income. But, on the other hand, the government remains communist at the core and exercises central planning in various guises. I wish Mr. Rogers had spoken more to how the government subsidizes raw materials for factories and how goods are dumped on the US market below cost. (In fairness, the USA has dumped depreciating currency on China as artificially low interest rates on treasuries will be followed by inflation in the years to come). China had to learn the businesses it now operates and it gained plenty of teachers by accepting investment and factory operational help from a lot of foreign investor companies as well as from Taiwan which has been a powerhouse in electronics and semiconductors getting its start in those areas in the late 1960s. In my opinion, Taiwan pointed the way for how well Chinese can compete if left unchained to do so. The author had little to say about Taiwan and I would have liked to have heard more about South Korea and Malaysia as well.Read more ›
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