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A Street Through Time Hardcover – November 9, 1998


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 32 pages
  • Publisher: DK CHILDREN; annotated edition edition (November 9, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0789434261
  • ISBN-13: 978-0789434265
  • Product Dimensions: 10.7 x 14 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.5 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (40 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #362,530 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 4-8-This oversize volume features full-color panoramic drawings of the same riverside European location at 14 different periods from the Stone Age to modern times. Each double-page spread includes a brief paragraph of description, while page borders provide summary overviews and scenes to locate. Some details are labeled. However, this is a book that relies primarily on its illustrations to convey information about the evolution of the site from a settlement to a city and the many eras (Viking, Roman, Medieval, etc.) that are represented. The coverage is so broad and the details are so small that it is often difficult to impossible to interpret what is being conveyed. While some young readers may find these views intriguing, others will find them frustrating and overwhelming.
Rosie Peasley, Empire Union School District, Modesto, CA
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Booklist

Gr. 3^-6. With each turn of its elongated pages, this imaginative volume graphically reveals the continuity of history. Beginning in the year 10,000 B.C., in a Stone Age hunters' camp, the book reveals how its riverfront location is key to the site's development. This primitive camp is the germ of the modern, bustling, big-city street viewed in the concluding double-page spread. In between, each panoramic image of this same locale witnesses significant achievements of each spotlighted epoch. The view from the Iron Age of 600 B.C. makes clear the impact of iron tools and weapons, and the next page jumps to A.D. 100 when the Roman influence means large stone buildings, a bridge, and an elaborate lifestyle. The medieval centuries draw repeated attention: first, the street as part of a village is visited in the 1200s; increased prosperity and growth see the village blossom into a town in the 1400s; the scene of the 1500s, eerily painted at night, intensifies the grisly realities of the Black Plague of that era. The text is printed in the borders, surrounding the pages and serving as a guide through the elaborately detailed illustrations, where keen-eyed readers can spot elements of humor and everyday life portrayed by the diminutive residents peopling the pages. There are also Where's Waldotype gimmicks to make a game of gleaning the most information from the busy artwork. A fun and effective way to lure youngsters into the study and enjoyment of history. Ellen Mandel

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Customer Reviews

I've had to buy a second copy of this wonderful book for my 14 year old son.
avid rita
The real creative force was clearly the illustrator; the author did very well too: the wealth of facts seem accurate and up to date.
Harmony Seeker
Older children learn quite a bit, and keep coming back to the book because there is always something new to find.
J. Ross

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

37 of 37 people found the following review helpful By avid rita on February 6, 2002
Format: Hardcover
I've had to buy a second copy of this wonderful book for my 14 year old son. He was deeply distressed when, thinking he'd outgrown it, I'd passed our first copy on to his school. The recommended age range is far too narrow, for adults have enjoyed it as a coffee table book as much as six year old visitors who find the transformation of years magical. My own children were impressed that civilizations do not always progress forward -- "The Invaders" and "The Plague Strikes" gave them a more dynamic sense of history. The fine illustrations pull the reader in, the rendering of characters give each of them full personality and interest. My kids generally have very limited interest in non-fiction; this one remains a favorite of their collection.
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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 2, 1999
Format: Hardcover
I originally bought this book for my older child, but my 4 year old son keeps this book glued to his side! I love the wonderful, detailed illustrations as well as the fascinating historical content. It brings to life the changes that occurred in a city in a way that words sometimes find hard to express, with a humor that children and adults alike will find charming. It has become one of my favorite books!
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By audrey TOP 500 REVIEWER on January 7, 2003
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is not a history text; it will not give you factoids or dates. But it will enliven your appreciation of the passage of time and the continuity of human existence. This is a large but lightweight book. Each page is approximately 13 by 10 inches, and each of the fourteen depictions are shown in a two-page spread of about 26 inches by 10. The site depicted is an area near a waterway, presumably in the English midlands, and the eras shown are 10,000 BCE, showing a winter settlement of Stone Age hunters; 2000 BCE, an early farming settlement; 600 BCE, the Iron Age; AD 100, during Roman occupation; 600, after the collapse of Roman civilization to barbarian invaders; 900, after the Viking raids; 1200s, a medieval village; 1400s, a medieval town; 1500s, during the Bubonic Plague; 1600s, during a time of religious wars; 1700s, the Regency period; early 1800s, the beginning of industrialization; late 1800s, a thriving city; and finally, a modern city. In successive time periods we see objects and buildings from the last era in ruins or having been adapted for other uses. We see that some things never change (boating or imbibing, for example) while others change markedly (technology, cleanliness, etc.), and that to "progress" is not always to move forward.
A fun book with lively cross-section watercolor drawings that will bring the concept of history to life, this book will lose some relevance for North American readers (who might also enjoy Gail Gibbons' FROM PATH TO HIGHWAY about the Boston Post Road through history), but it is still eminently worthwhile and enjoyable.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 18, 2001
Format: Hardcover
"A Street Through Time" is a lovely, informative, child-friendly approach to history. My five year old adores it. We have probably read it 50 times. Great details, great jumping off spots for all kinds of different discussions with kids.
I think the 9 - 12 age recommendation is too narrow. I think that inquisitive 4 and 5 year olds will love it too (and if they don't this year, they will soon!)
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By beachreveler on February 7, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Though the age recommendation for this book is 9-12, our son got this book when he was only 4 years old and it has remained one of his favorites. Now, nearly two and a half years after he got it, it was taken into school just this week by him as "something special to show the class." Adults as well as kids can learn a lot about history from this book. Each page is from a different period in time, supposedly on the same plot of land (presumably in Europe). It is a great springboard for exploring ANY historical time... and where it fits in with others. The illustrations are wonderful and search-and-find type information snippets written around the borders help bring some starting points for discussion. Couldn't recommend this book more!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By J. A. Edwards on January 17, 2006
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is one of those books with GREAT detailed images that children love to dwell on for ages. Although they are looking for the similaries/changes from age to age, and looking for the little man cleverly hidden in each image, they are unknowingly also learning a LOT, as evidenced by the many questions they will ask. The idea of history and "long ago times" is often a difficult concept for younger children to grapple with, but this book (and others like it) serve as a great tool for starting to understand these ideas while they have great fun at the same time. Steve Noon has an remarkable artist's eye for detail (and for conveying it) that reminds me of David MacCaulay's books, which I also highly recommend, ex: "Pyramid", "Mill", "Castle", "Cathredral", etc.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Mars Violet on July 31, 2006
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book presents a dozen historically significant dates and vignettes from the stone age to the present day. The realistic illustrations of the street, its buildings and inhabitants show a snapshot of each age plus lingering elements from earlier times. A scene from circa 1500 AD, for example, shows intimate details and panoramic views: a white cross marking the door of a quarantined house, the visible panic of a plague victim upon seeing the black pustules under his arm, a medieval windmill built on a prehistoric barrow, a castle built on the ruins of a Roman fort, etc. The drama and detail help history come alive for readers.

Adults may not learn anything new from A Street Through Time but children glean a great deal of information from the labeled illustrations and interesting facts listed in the margins. My kids inspect this book repeatedly, paying special attention to the activities of their young counterparts down through the ages.
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