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Streetwalking the Metropolis: Women, the City, and Modernity Paperback – April 20, 2000

ISBN-13: 978-0198186830 ISBN-10: 0198186835

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press (April 20, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0198186835
  • ISBN-13: 978-0198186830
  • Product Dimensions: 8.8 x 6.5 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,233,887 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

`carefully crafted, highly detailed, and interesting' J.A.Dompkowski, CHOICE

`The book will find a readership not only among specialists across the relevant disciplines, but also among students and general readers eager to explore alternatives to the traditional Pound-Eliot-Joyce axis: that OUP has published both hard and paperback editions testifies to this broad appeal' Sean Matthews, Times Higher Education Supplement

`Streetwalking the Metropolis is a convincing and assured performance' Sean Matthews, Times Higher Education Supplement

`Deborah Parson's achievement is to draw from a range of critics, in a variety of disciplines, to produce a new perspective on the nature of literary modernism in the period 1880 to 1945.' Sean Matthews, THES

`electic and insightful' Sean Matthews, THES

`This is a fascinating, meticulous, needling book ... Her view of the history of twentieth-century feminist writing is positive and forward-looking. ... Deborah Parsons's compelling book.' Sue Roe, Times Literary Supplement

About the Author

Lecturer in English Literature, University of Birmingham

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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 6, 2001
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
modernity is an idea that has been defined elsewhere as the revolution that began when the first rioter pried a cobblestone up out of the street and threw it at the bastille in 1789. it's the history of the "rights" of man.
many of the 19th century writers -- starting with gogol (prequel: pushkin, sequel: dostoevsky) -- and emphatically including baudelaire and dickens -- wrote of what has come to be known as the revolutionary encounter. this happened beginning in czar peter's st. petersburg, where the wide sidewalks along the nevsky prospect (designed by a frenchman, leblond) let russia's "new men" -- drawn to the new capital by the new bureaucratic jobs -- mix on the sidewalks with soldiers, aristocrats, formerly cloistered women. the different classes mixed for the first time in history, and *saw* one another.
manet and the french impressionists took up the idea from their friend the poet baudelaire, that there was a "new man" called a flaneur. he *saw* modernity (and streetwalking "new" women) on the new sidewalks of haussman's paris...dickens, who walked at least six miles a day, much of the time at night, through london, transformed what he saw as a "flaneur" -- including, for the first time, the use of a child as a hero/narrator -- into revolutionary "modern" art.
this book argues, and proves that there were women walking the streets and observing modernity in our own way. among the forgotten woman writers parsons writes of is amy levy, a "flaneuse" of london, who argued among other things that jews' identities first formed in modernity, in the revolutionary encounters on the sidewalks.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 6, 2001
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
modernity is an idea that has been defined elsewhere as the revolution that began when the first rioter pried a cobblestone up out of the street and threw it at the bastille in 1789. it's the history of the "rights" of man.
many of the 19th century writers -- starting with gogol (prequel: pushkin, sequel: dostoevsky) -- and emphatically including baudelaire and dickens -- wrote of what has come to be known as the revolutionary encounter. this happened beginning in czar peter's st. petersburg, where the wide sidewalks along the nevsky prospect (designed by a frenchman, leblond) let russia's "new men" -- drawn to the new capital by the new bureaucratic jobs -- mix on the sidewalks with soldiers, aristocrats, formerly cloistered women. the different classes mixed for the first time in history, and *saw* one another.
manet and the french impressionists took up the idea from their friend the poet baudelaire, that there was a "new man" called a flaneur. he *saw* modernity (and streetwalking "new" women) on the new sidewalks of haussman's paris...dickens, who walked at least six miles a day, much of the time at night, through london, transformed what he saw as a "flaneur" -- including, for the first time, the use of a child as a hero/narrator -- into revolutionary "modern" art.
this book argues, and proves that there were women walking the streets and observing modernity in our own way. among the forgotten woman writers parsons writes of is amy levy, a "flaneuse" of london, who argued among other things that jews' identities first formed in modernity, in the revolutionary encounters on the sidewalks.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 6, 2001
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
modernity is an idea that has been defined elsewhere as the revolution that began when the first rioter pried a cobblestone up out of the street and threw it at the bastille in 1789. it's the history of the "rights" of man.
many of the 19th century writers -- starting with gogol (prequel: pushkin, sequel: dostoevsky) -- and emphatically including baudelaire and dickens -- wrote of what has come to be known as the revolutionary encounter. this happened beginning in czar peter's st. petersburg, where the wide sidewalks along the nevsky prospect (designed by a frenchman, leblond) let russia's "new men" -- drawn to the new capital by the new bureaucratic jobs -- mix on the sidewalks with soldiers, aristocrats, formerly cloistered women. the different classes mixed for the first time in history, and *saw* one another.
manet and the french impressionists took up the idea from their friend the poet baudelaire, that there was a "new man" called a flaneur. he *saw* modernity (and streetwalking "new" women) on the new sidewalks of haussman's paris...dickens, who walked at least six miles a day, much of the time at night, through london, transformed what he saw as a "flaneur" -- including, for the first time, the use of a child as a hero/narrator -- into revolutionary "modern" art.
this book argues, and proves that there were women walking the streets and observing modernity in our own way. among the forgotten woman writers parsons writes of is amy levy, a "flaneuse" of london, who argued among other things that jews' identities first formed in modernity, in the revolutionary encounters on the sidewalks.
Read more ›
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