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Strega Nona's Magic Lessons Paperback – April 16, 1984


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 4 - 8 years
  • Grade Level: Preschool - 3
  • Lexile Measure: 290L (What's this?)
  • Paperback: 32 pages
  • Publisher: HMH Books for Young Readers; Reprint edition (April 16, 1984)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0152817867
  • ISBN-13: 978-0152817862
  • Product Dimensions: 11 x 8.5 x 0.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #81,392 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

The popular Big Anthony tries once again to use Strega Nonas magic with the usual hilarious and disastrous results. Played for laughs-successfully. (Booklist ) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

No Bio --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

"Tomie dePaola was born in Meriden, Connecticut, in 1934 to a family of Irish and Italian background. By the time he could hold a pencil, he knew what his life's work would be. His determination to create books for children led to a BFA from Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, New York, and an MFA from the California College of Arts & Crafts in Oakland, California.
It drove him through the years of teaching, designing greeting cards and stage sets, and painting church murals until 1965, when he illustrated his first children's book, Sound, by Lisa Miller for Coward-McCann. Eventually, freed of other obligations, he plunged full time into both writing and illustrating children's books.
He names Fra Angelico and Giotto, Georges Rouault, and Ben Shahn as major influences on his work, but he soon found his own unique style. His particular way with color, line, detail, and design have earned him many of the most prestigious awards in his field, among them a Caldecott Honor Award for Strega Nona, the Smithsonian Medal from the Smithsonian Institution, the Kerlan Award from the University of Minnesota for his ""singular attainment in children's literature,"" the Catholic Library Association's Regina Medal for his ""continued distinguished contribution,"" and the University of Southern Mississippi Medallion. He was also the 1990 United States nominee for the Hans Christian Andersen Medal for illustration.
Tomie dePaola has published almost 200 children's books in fifteen different countries. He remains one of the most popular creators of books for children, receiving more than 100,000 fan letters each year.
Tomie lives in an interesting house in New Hampshire with his four dogs. His studio is in a large renovated 200-year-old barn.
- He has been published for over 30 years.
- Over 5 million copies of his books have sold worldwide.
- His books have been published in over 15 different countries.
- He receives nearly 100,000 fan letters each year.
Tomie dePaola has received virtually every significant recognition for his books in the children's book world, including:
- Caldecott Honor Award from American Library Association
- Newbery Honor Award from American Library Association
- Smithson Medal from Smithsonian Institution
- USA nominee in illustration for Hans Christian Andersen Medal
- Regina Medal from Catholic Library Association

"

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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See all 17 customer reviews
Greatly entertaining with subtle morality.
J.W.
So... creative, funny, and provides learning opportunities (did I mention that Big Anthony learns a lesson in it as well?).
David Andrew Levy
One of my niece's favorite bedtime stories.
MG

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 16, 2000
Format: Paperback
Poor Big Anthony! He tries so hard, but he just hasn't quite learned that his talent lies in other areas. You and your child will love this tale told by Tomie de Paolo (the master!). The artwork is colorful and the story is full of grins and giggles. Girls will like this book because the girl in the story can do things better than Big Anthony. Boys will like this book because it shows that you can make mistakes and learn from them. I loved it, and so will you.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Amy Graham on January 4, 2007
Format: Paperback
In Strega Nona's Magic Lessons we once again join Strega Nona as she teaches Bambalona and a surprising new student Antonia (Big Anthony in disguise) to be Strega too. Bambalona learns well while Antonia struggles and gets it all wrong (humorous and expected, given Big Anthony's past with Strega Nona). When the day comes that Strega Nona gives Bambalona her spell book to study and tells Antonia that she's not ready yet, well, Big Anthony can't accept that and sneaks out in the middle of the night to get the book....and that's when he does it again, he messes with Strega Nona's magic and turns her into a frog. Both he and Bambalona are horrified and worried that they'll never get her back. As usual its love, honesty, integrity and a little forgiveness that wins the day. Another fine addition to the Strega Nona series! Readers will love this fun and silly look at what makes the world go `round. I give it five stars, I love the charming and timeless quality of the stories and illustrations (which are simple yet have a strong old world flavor that is ever so appealing).
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on March 7, 2003
Format: Paperback
The three main characters in this book are Bambolona, Strega Nona, Bid Anthony, and Antonia. The story starts off with Bambolona having to work at her father's bakery. She always had to wake up before the sun rise and was sick and tired of it. She told her father that she had too much to do and that she could use some help. Her father just told her to get up earlier. Bambolona has enough with working athe the bakery, so she decides that she is going to go see Strega Nona, so she can learn how to do magic.
Strega Nona is overjoyed to have Bambolona learn magic. Big Anthony, who works around the yard outside and around the house, wanted to learn magic too. Strega Nona says no to him. Big anthony gets upset and decides to go work at the bakery. the baker fires him because he eats the food and doesn't do what he is told. he decides to go back to Strega Nona's house.
When Strega Nona answers the door, a girl is standing there and is named Antonia. Strega Nona is happy that she is there and will teach her magic too. Bambolona does a great job and Antonia doesn't do anything right. Strega Nona thinks that Bambolona is ready for harder magic. Antonia thinks she is too, eventhough Strega Nona says no.
Antonia decides to steal Bambolona's book of hard spells. The next day, she tries to turn an iron kettle into gold. She ends up turning Strega Nona into a toad. She didn't know what to do, so she decides to ask Bambolona for help. She says she can't help her.
Will Strega Nona ever become human again, or will she stay a toad forever? Read the book to find out. I enjoyed this book because my parents use to read it to me all the time when I was younger.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 16, 1998
Format: Paperback
My second grade class has been doing an author study on Tomy De Paola. They just heard "Strega Nona's Magic Lessons" and loved it. Every child laughed at the part where Big Anthony dressed up as a girl. As a language arts lesson they wrote a sentence about the beginning, middle, and end of the book with illustrations. If you visit our web site and make sure to see Alex's and Kevin's page. They drew pictures of Big Anthony that are simply adorable.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By David Andrew Levy on October 9, 2007
Format: Paperback
I just returned from reading this to a classroom of 2nd graders (basically, 7 and 8 year-olds).

This book seemed to be at just the right level for these kids. Most of them understood how Strega Nona and Bambolona tricked Big Anthony, but a couple didn't seem to. This, to me, is an example of how one book can provide opportunities to test a child's power of perception or provide him or her a new way to look at things. Nice.

As a read-aloud, the book is just about the right length (maybe a tiny bit long), and there are several opportunities to use character voices, making it a lot of fun and captivating. Many of the pages contain small-ish pictures, so it is not ideal for holding up and showing to a class unless you can sit very close to them. This book would be even better for a child in your lap or as a bedtime story, where a child can look at (for example) the dichotomy between the results of Bambolona's use of magic and Big Anthony's sad attempts, even while you're still reading the words (a great example here where the pictures contain more story than the words).

Something that places this book above many shorter or "younger" picture books is that the storyline include a minor subplot (Big Anthony, feeling slighted by Strega Nona, goes to work for the baker, who, since Bambolona has left, needs an assistant). It works without taking up too much space and detracting from the main storyline. Plus, the book contains a small amount of Italian (always translated immediately).

So... creative, funny, and provides learning opportunities (did I mention that Big Anthony learns a lesson in it as well?). How can you go wrong?
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