Strike NR

Amazon Instant Video

(17) IMDb 7.7/10

Sergei Eisenstein's "Strike," with Orson Welles' "Citizen Kane," mark the most outstanding cinematic debuts in the history of film. Triggered by the suicide of a worker unjustly accused of theft, a strike is called by the laborers of a Moscow factory. The managers, owner and the Czarist government dispatch infiltrators in an attempt to break the workers unity. Unsuccessful, they hire the police and, in the film's most harrowing and powerful sequences, the unarmed strikers are slaughtered in a brutal confrontation. This edition of "Strike" is digitally remastered from a mint-condition 35mm print made from the original camera negative and features new stereo music composed and performed by the Alloy Orchestra.

Starring:
Maksim Shtraukh, Grigori Aleksandrov
Runtime:
1 hour 35 minutes

Strike

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Product Details

Genres Drama
Director Sergei M. Eisenstein
Starring Maksim Shtraukh, Grigori Aleksandrov
Supporting actors Mikhail Gomorov, I. Ivanov, Ivan Klyukvin, Aleksandr Antonov, Yudif Glizer, Anatoliy Kuznetsov, Vera Yanukova, Vladimir Uralsky, M. Mamin, Boris Yurtsev
Studio Egami Media
MPAA rating NR (Not Rated)
Rental rights 7-day viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

Good for silent film buffs.
M. Ziemke
That gives the film more headroom, and it really makes a difference in the full portrayal of the art of Eisenstein.
Joseph L. Ponessa
While it is is expected to see white specks and a little film damage, the picture quality is magnificent.
Dennis A. Amith (kndy)

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Joseph L. Ponessa on September 26, 2011
Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
(THE) STRIKE was the first film made by Sergei Eisenstein. The film is a tragedy, ending in annihilation, and it does not seem to have a final resolution other than the ending title card "Remember!" That the crowned heads of Europe imposed a regime of repression upon their people for a whole century from the fall of Napoleon to the end of the First World War is a well documented fact, and so this film does not actually go over the top in portraying it. In fact, there is a lot of humor along the way, which is found off-putting by some reviewers. This humor probably belongs to a tentative strand of thinking that was going on in the Soviet film industry at the time. While STRIKE was in production, Protazanov's blend of whimsy and realism, the science fiction classic AELITA opened in Moscow, and the theater facade was decked with gigantic figures of the King and Queen of Mars. The crush of patrons was so great that the director himself was unable to get into the theater, and had to miss the premiere. This popular success seems to have frightened the Soviet authorities, and Protazanov was put on a leash, and Eisenstein himself never indulged in such antics as these again. Then there would be only the straight propagandistic melodrama of OCTOBER and MOTHER and so forth.
Of course, STRIKE is propaganda, too. Notably, we do not know the names of any single character until after he or she is dead. The worker who hangs himself leaves behind a suicide note, and only then do we find out his name. That is the trigger that launches the strike. At the end, after the massacre, a single title card appears with a bunch of first names.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on September 2, 2002
Format: VHS Tape
If the quick and easy label is to call Sergei Eisenstein the Orson Welles of Soviet cinema, chronology notwithstanding, then "Strike" ("Stachka") is the great director's "Citizen Kane." This comparison would be dictated not by the greatness of this 1924 silent film, but rather by the fact "Strike" was Eisenstein's debut film. What the young Eisenstein clearly has in common with the young Welles is the reckless creativity of a kid with a brand new toy. The story is about the strike of factory workers in Czarist Russia in 1912, which ends with the rebellious comrades being brutally beaten down.
Eisenstein might be consumed with exploring the boundaries of cinematic technique, but he does evince some basic storytelling skills here. The climatic tragedy is set up initial comic element, which gain our sympathy for the workers on a human rather than an ideological level. Certainly a management that brings in spies and agents to infiltrate the oppressed workers cannot be supported. The strike begins after a factory worker, falsely accused of being a thief, hangs himself. The initial excitement over the prospects of success faded as the strike goes on and on. When the provocateurs hired by management finally bring things to a head, the tired and hungry workers are no match for the military troops that come to crush them. "Strike" features Grigori Aleksandrov as the Factory Foreman, Aleksandr Antonov as a Member of Strike Committee, Yudif Glizer as the Queen of Thieves, and I. Ivanov as the Chief of Police.
The more you know about Eisenstein's later works, the more you will recognize the raw cinematic techniques he displays in his first film as being refined in his later masterpieces.
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Format: Blu-ray
An epic feature film debut by filmmaker and film theorist Sergei Eisenstein. A precursor to the violence and large scale fights shown in his later films, "Strike" will continue to resonate strongly with cinema fans, especially for its famous final sequence.

The great Russian director Sergei Eisenstein, known for films such as the 1938 "Alexander Nevsky" and the 1944-1946 films "Ivan the Terrible" and a filmmaker who will be remembered for is his 1925 masterpiece "The Battleship Potemkin".

But a year before "Battleship Potemkin", "Stachka" aka "Strike" was created in 1925 and in Eisenstein's polemic cinematic style featured a theme of collectivism versus individualism and also featured the talent of the Proletcult Theatre.

"Strike" is a film that takes place during the Czarist rule and showcases workers of a Russian factory. The morale of the workers are low and while these workers work very long hours for little pay, the owners and higher up of the factory are shown as porkly characters that could care less about the employees but are more concerned of making money, eating and drinking well and getting rich.

Featured in six parts, the film begins with the following quote by Vladimir Lenin:

The strength of the working class is organization. Without organization of the masses, the proletarian is nothing. Organized it is everything. Being organized means unity of action, unity of practical activity.

VIDEO & AUDIO:

"Strike" is presented in 1080p High Definition (1:33:1) and is presented in Linear PCM 2.0 Stereo (music performed by the Mont Alto Motion Picture Orchestra). The edition featured on Blu-ray of "Strike" is a version mastered in HD from a 35 mm film element restored by the Cinematheque de Toulouse.
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