Reg Strikes Back (Remastered With Bonus Tracks)

May 15, 2001 | Format: MP3

$9.49
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
3:40
30
2
4:39
30
3
4:12
30
4
4:35
30
5
4:40
30
6
3:30
30
7
4:36
30
8
3:30
30
9
3:50
30
10
4:54
30
11
3:48
30
12
7:16
30
13
4:37
30
14
6:19

Product Details

  • Original Release Date: May 15, 2001
  • Release Date: May 15, 2001
  • Label: Island Records
  • Copyright: (C) 1998 Mercury Records Limited
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:04:06
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B000VWJ66Q
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (29 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #43,957 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Elton's mid-80's albums were competent, but not exactly brimming with enthusiasm or vitality.
dfu
It's not a very consistent album. "I Don't Want To Go On With You Like That", the first single, was a great, catchy, up-tempo song.
Barry
Although the album has been remastered wel, the songs still don't have the feeling other records did.
Michael Kerner

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Lonnie E. Holder HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on June 23, 2005
Format: Audio CD
After having a number of lackluster and uninspired releases through the 1980s, with perhaps the lowest point being the 1986 release of "Leather Jackets," Elton John started a turnaround in quality and artistry that was evident on this album, and would achieve albums such as "The One" and "Made in England" in the 90s. While this album had much less quality and artistry than Elton's 70s albums, loyal fans were gratified to see that Elton could still write and sing good songs.

Elton's rediscovered enthusiasm shows in "Town of Plenty." Admittedly this song is one of the lesser songs on this CD; the words are corny and simple, and the music is relatively simple. However, Elton's voice sounds refreshed and clear, and the production is much improved over "Leather Jackets." This simple song is little indication of the music that comes later on this CD.

The second song also has relatively simple words, though more complex and inspired than the words of the first song. However, Elton's music in "A Word in Spanish" contains a flavor of that sound that made Elton John great in years gone by. This song was also the longest song on the original CD at 4:39 long. This mellow love song peaked at #19 on the charts in 1988. With the improvement over the first song, this song promised that this CD held even better songs.

Elton and his band get bombastic on "Mona Lisas and Mad Hatters (Part Two)." The original song was a mellow and harmonious creation on "Honky Chateau." This version is funky and bouncy, and far from being mellow. While I am tempted to compare this song with some of the worst from "Leather Jackets," the comparison would be wrong. This song has fun with the overblown style, and keeps the enthusiasm evinced from the first song.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Lone Wolf on May 5, 2010
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I bought this album way back in 1988 right after it was released & it is still one of my favorites today. IMHO, it is not only one of the best from the 80's but also Elton's expansive catalog as well. Alot of fans do tend to knock it becuz it sounds too 80's or becuz there's alot of synth or becuz it isn't up there with classic albums like "Yellow Brick Road". So does it have songs that measure up to epics like "Funeral for a Friend/Love Lies Bleeding"? Nope. But what it does have is a strong set of songs with great lyrics, infectious melodies & also some hidden gems that never made it on the radio but probably could have. Tracks like "Town of Plenty", "Mona Lisa's And Mad Hatters (Part Two)" & "Goodbye Marlon Brando" are very likable & fast paced pop tunes you will probably like the very first time you hear them. Then, of course, you have the album's big hit "I Don't Wanna Go on With You Like That". A very catchy dance track with a nice rhythm to it. My favorite track on the album is "The Camera Never Lies". It is a very catchy mid-tempo number that kind of sounds a little like Elton's future hit - "Healing Hands" and just like that song it has great percussion, piano, synth & a nice chorus as well. It's a shame it wasn't released as a radio single cuz I think it could've charted fairly well if given the chance. The ballads on the album are also top notch. The best being the elegant single - "A Word In Spanish". Definitely one of Elton's best songs. I also enjoyed the quiet but atmospheric "Japanese Hands" & the album's closer "Since God Invented Girls" which is a tribute not only to beautiful women but also the Beach Boys and as it turns out, they showed up to provide their trademark harmony b/g vocals on the song.Read more ›
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Patty MacDuffie on September 14, 2002
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I bought this CD for "A Word in Spanish," which I really like. I listened to the CD in the car while driving and heard about half of it and thought it was average with a couple of good songs. Then I listened again on my computer with my Klipsch 4.1's. Wow, some of this stuff is pretty good! So I put it on the big system with the Klipsch towers and cranked up the bass and the volume. Incredible! The Shep Pettibone remix of "I don't wanna go on with you like that," is worth the price of the album and more. Everything else is "added value." "Heavy Traffic" is a great rock tune. Freddie Hubbard's flugelhorn in "Mad Hatters" is a thrill and a half! And then there's Carl Wilson singing background on "Since God Created Girls." Outstanding! If you only listened once, listen again! And more closely. This is rapidly becoming my favorite Elton John album. And yes, there are a few songs on it I don't care for, but that's true of most albums. Oh, and lest I forget, Elton John is pretty good too. (Just kidding, he is awesome as usual!)
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By John Kwok HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on July 20, 2006
Format: Audio CD
"Reg Strikes Back" remains among my favorite CDs from Elton John's artistically fallow, but still commercially rich, 1980s period, with a number of songs from the John/Taupin songwriting team that rank with their finest from any decade in their three decade plus-long career. The album's title is a thinly veiled reference to Elton's real name (Reg Dwight), his successful recovery from surgery on his vocal chords, and his desire to return musically to some of his best songwriting during the early 1970s. But granted, "Reg Strikes Back" is an artistic achievement which seems rather inferior in quality to the albums which would follow it immediately: "Sleeping With the Past" and "The One", since there is a mixture of rather routine 1980s commerically-oriented songs along with a few genuine gems. Still, thanks to excellent production from 1980s producer Chris Thomas and his team, the sound quality remains among the best for a 1980s Elton John studio album. "Reg Strikes Back" includes most of the musicians who were members of the Elton John Band from the "Live in Australia" album and tour; most notably bassist David Paton, keyboard wizard and guitarist Fred Mandel, drummer Charlie Morgan, percussionist Ray Cooper, and of course, guitarist Davey Johnstone (It also includes as backup vocalists original Elton John Band members Dee Murray and Nigel Olsson.).

"Town of Plenty", the album's opening track, an uptempo rocker, sounds like it could be a 1980s update of "Bennie and the Jets", but lacks the latter's elegant lyrics and lush melodies. "A Word in Spanish", the second track (and second hit single) is a decent ballad featuring splendid mandolin playing from a long-time Elton John band member, guitarist Davey Johnstone.
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