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Strip Paperback – Bargain Price, May 5, 2011

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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Starred Review. Half a dozen characters vie for primacy in this rambunctiously entertaining L.A. crime novel from Edgar-winner Perry (Runner). Aging strip-club owner Manco Kapak orders his boys to find the masked man who stole his cash receipts and take care of him. The boys settle on the wrong guy, L.A. newcomer Joe Carver, who decides to fight back. Jefferson Davis Falkins, the real thief, decides to continue to rob Kapak. LAPD Lt. Nick Slosser is mainly interested in keeping the peace—and keeping his two marriages a secret as well as figuring out how to pay for five kids at or nearing college age. Other meaty roles include Carrie Carr, who hooks up with Falkins and becomes a Bonnie Parker–like adrenaline junkie urging him to ever riskier deeds, and Spence, Kapak's trusted bodyguard and the only one smart enough to deal with Carver. Perry's exquisite timing and finesse provide near perfect endings to the multiple story lines and make this escapist reading at its best. (May)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Bookmarks Magazine

Many critics commented that the plethora of characters and subplots might have undermined Strip's power, but they all agreed that Perry's talent in weaving together seemingly loose strands makes the book an unqualified success. The intriguing, action-oriented characters--each with his or her own agenda--captivated reviewers, some of whom ended up rooting for even the bad guys. "The wonderful characters keep on coming," noted the New York Times Book Review. Although they start off as "familiar types ... once Perry lets them loose, they refuse to go back in the box." The action is packed, and the denouement is a small masterpiece. What more could readers want? --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 360 pages
  • Publisher: Mariner Books; Reprint edition (May 5, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0156035596
  • ASIN: B005OHT3A2
  • Product Dimensions: 7.9 x 5.3 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (80 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,445,701 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

THOMAS PERRY is the author of 23 novels including the Jane Whitefield series (Vanishing Act, Dance for the Dead, Shadow Woman, The Face Changers, Blood Money, Runner, Poison Flower, and A String of Beads), Death Benefits, and Pursuit, the first recipient of the Gumshoe Award for best novel. He won the Edgar for The Butcher's Boy, and Metzger's Dog was a New York Times Notable Book. The Independent Mystery Bookseller's Association included Vanishing Act in its "100 Favorite Mysteries of the 20th Century," and Nightlife was a New York Times bestseller. Metzger's Dog was voted one of NPR's 100 Killer Thrillers--Best Thrillers Ever.
Thomas Perry was born in Tonawanda, New York in 1947. He received a B.A. from Cornell University in 1969 and a Ph.D. in English from the University of Rochester in 1974. He has worked as a park maintenance man, factory laborer, commercial fisherman, university administrator and teacher, and a writer and producer of prime time network television shows. He lives in Southern California.  His website: www.thomasperryauthor.com

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

49 of 54 people found the following review helpful By TMStyles VINE VOICE on May 2, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
"Strip" is a fine addition to Thomas Perry's work. As usual, his timing and characterizations are his greatest assets. He builds credible and believable characters both through effective back story and through their interactions within the story. Perry always presents authentic believable dialogue to streamline his pacing.

Manco Kapek is a small time gangster who owns several strip clubs but has a sideline activity laundering money for a bigger gangster. When he is robbed making an early morning deposit in a bank's night deposit box by a masked gunman, he angrily sends his henchmen out to find someone who is spending large sums of money and is so new to LA that he didn't realize he was robbing a mobster. When the name Joe Carver comes up a couple times, Kapek orders his men to exact revenge upon Mr. Carver.

Unfortunately for Kapek, Joe Carver is not a man to be trifled with and he quickly responds to the mobster's efforts to kill him by declaring financial and ultimately open war upon Manco. Meanwhile, the real petty thief, Jefferson Falkins, and his new girlfriend, Carrie Carr, decide that robbing Manco Kapek is so lucrative and easy that they do it again. Manco is furious not knowing who the real thief is but growing confident that he should never have messed with Joe Carver.

To this festering case of mistaken identity and a budding Bonnie and Clyde, add LAPD Lt. Nick Slosser, a smart-enough cop but one who lives on the edge as attested by his bigamy and the financial demands of two families. Nick suspects Kapek of several crimes and effectively pressures him throughout the novel. But is Nick strong enough to stay clean and do what is right?
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28 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Scott on May 20, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Thomas Perry has been such a good writer for so many years. "Metzger's Dog" is a riot. "The Butcher's Boy" and "Sleeping Dog" are masterpieces of the genre. And Jane Whitefield is a classic character, even though his last outing featuring her ("Runner") was a bit lightweight when compared to her earlier adventures.

This new book is entertaining enough, though not in the same class as his other "stand alones" like "Death Benefits" and "Dead Aim". It reads more like a movie script, and I felt the ending was too rushed, with a couple of revelations left unexplained. Again, fun, but not classic Thomas Perry.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Fred Gronvall on May 27, 2010
Format: Hardcover
This is an excellent crime novel with a tip of the hat to Elmore Leonard. Perry creates unusual and interesting criminal characters and their exploits are fun to watch unfold. In the end things are wrapped up neatly and with an unexpected twist, justice doesn't exactly prevail....but let's say justice is done. This is one of Perry's good ones.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Dave Schranck on September 4, 2010
Format: Hardcover
When I think of Mr Perry's books, "Butcher's Boy", "Sleeping Dogs", "Pursuit" and of course the Whitefield series come to mind. This book, "Strip" is very unlike his earlier treasures but it was still good. One difference is that there are a lot of characters, each with their own story to tell. His other books with the exception of "Island" have relatively few characters and the story line is more focused. There is Joe Carver who was already on the Fed's protection program, being falsely accused of stealing and being hunted down by a saloon owner. Carver fights back and gets the best of Kapak. Then there's Manco Kapak, the saloon owner and money launderer who was robbed and looking for revenge. After Kapak, there's Jeff Falkins, a two timing thief and his new girlfriend who happens to be a psychotic killer who lives for a thrill. A police detective named, Slossner, is out to convict Kapak turns out to be a big time thief and bigamist. Sherri Wynn, a waitress, befriends Kapak but all she wants is his money.
Can't forget Manuel Rogoso, a drug dealer, who tries to kill Kapak. Kapak's bodyguards, thinking that he's ripe for a fall, try to take over but fail. Then there's Spence, the Gaffney brothers, Voinovich, Sandy Belknap and others. They each have their stories; their interesting but with so many, Mr Perry doesn't delve as deeply into each character as his earlier books. Each of these characters have threads of commonality and Perry does a pretty good job of tying them together but there is some unevenness. For example, Joe Carver starts out strong but is then not heard from for chapters and when he comes back, its in a lesser role. The surprised ending is fairly brief but is explicit and you will know how everyone makes it through their ordeal. Some have happy endings but many don't.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Gregg Eldred VINE VOICE on November 9, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Joe Carver does not have a permanent address in Los Angeles. For now, he is sleeping in the cab of a tower crane at a construction site. Carver knows that someone has him in their sights; he noticed some very bad men trailing him. Reviewing his short time in LA, Carver figures that throwing around a lot of money in the clubs was probably a bad idea, but one that got him contacts and dates. Now, it appears that a strip club owner, Claudiu "Manco" Kapak, who was robbed of his cash deposit at gun point by a masked man, believes that Carver is the suspect. Carver may be innocent of the robbery, but he is not without defensive skills. Kapak has picked the wrong man.

Jefferson Davis Falkins is the real culprit. He has been living with a woman who is a waitress at one of Kapak's strip clubs, and knows the deposit routine. When thrown out of the apartment, Falkins hooks up with Carrie, a woman who loves robbing Kapak of his night deposits. Maybe a bit too much.

Of the people that Kapak sends out to rid himself of Carver, only Kapak's right hand man and confidant, Spence, is smart enough to handle Carver. Spence seems to understand what is happening and why, and takes it upon himself to find Carver, outside of Kapak's usual methods.

Adding to the list of characters, is police Lieutenant Nick Slosser. who is in charge of the investigation into Kapak's robbery. But Slosser has his own issue, juggling his bigamous marriages with children ready to head off to college. Keeping the two wives ignorant of each other, while guiding his children to different universities, is taking its toll on his mental health.

Thomas Perry's keeps all of the characters in motion, making Strip a wonderful mystery.
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