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Stuck With Virtue (Religion and Contemporary Culture) Hardcover – October 1, 2005

3 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

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About the Author

Peter Augustine Lawler is Dana Professor and Chair of the Department of Government and International Studies at Berry College and executive editor of the quarterly journal Perspectives on Political Science. A member of the President’s Council on Bioethics, he has written on the intersection of politics, religion, and biotechnology for the Weekly Standard, the New Atlantis, National Review, and Society, among many other leading periodicals. Among his books are Postmodernism Rightly Understood: The Return to Realism in American Thought and Aliens in America: The Strange Truth about Our Souls, also published by ISI Books.
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Product Details

  • Series: Religion and Contemporary Culture
  • Hardcover: 325 pages
  • Publisher: Intercollegiate Studies Institute (October 1, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1932236848
  • ISBN-13: 978-1932236842
  • Product Dimensions: 8.8 x 5.9 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,646,264 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Format: Hardcover
With all the talk about human enhancements, cloning, and gene alterations, are we heading for a Brave New World of horror? Plenty of science fiction stories would have you think so - but not political philosophy scholar Peter Lawler in STUCK WITH VIRTUE: THE AMERICAN INDIVIDUAL AND OUR BIOTECHNOLOGY FUTURE. His contention is that, quite the opposite, mankind's own libertarian principles will lend to tyranny, not biological experimentation - and he maintains that the human ability to different between feeling good and being good will remain as a stop gate to biotechnology's fast pace. An intriguing discussion.
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We read this in an honors Political Science class on Darwinism in politics.

It was pretty universal that the entire premise of his argument was pure bologna. No one in the class, including the professor, thought his argument held any weight. It was a boring read and hard to get through once you realized Lawler was just blowing steam, which was pretty quickly.

Larry Arnhart, who holds the opposite viewpoint, gave a much more convincing argument on the subject. The class much preferred his book over Lawler's. I would recommend his book over Lawler's any day, but if you want to compare the two, then go ahead and purchase this book. It'll just serve to reinforce Arnhart's statements.
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