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A Study in Scarlet (Illustrated Classics): A Sherlock Holmes Graphic Novel Paperback – February 11, 2010


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A Study in Scarlet (Illustrated Classics): A Sherlock Holmes Graphic Novel + The Hound of the Baskervilles (Dover Thrift Editions)
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Product Details

  • Series: Illustrated Classics
  • Paperback: 144 pages
  • Publisher: Sterling; Reprint edition (February 11, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1402770820
  • ISBN-13: 978-1402770821
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 6.5 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (470 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,012,934 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Arthur Conan Doyle's Study in Scarlet is the first published story involving the legendary Sherlock Holmes, arguably the world's best-known detective, and the first narrative by Holmes's Boswell, the unassuming Dr. Watson, a military surgeon lately returned from the Afghan War. Watson needs a flat-mate and a diversion. Holmes needs a foil. And thus a great literary collaboration begins.

Watson and Holmes move to a now-famous address, 221B Baker Street, where Watson is introduced to Holmes's eccentricities as well as his uncanny ability to deduce information about his fellow beings. Somewhat shaken by Holmes's egotism, Watson is nonetheless dazzled by his seemingly magical ability to provide detailed information about a man glimpsed once under the streetlamp across the road.

Then murder. Facing a deserted house, a twisted corpse with no wounds, a mysterious phrase drawn in blood on the wall, and the buffoons of Scotland Yard--Lestrade and Gregson--Holmes measures, observes, picks up a pinch of this and a pinch of that, and generally baffles his faithful Watson. Later, Holmes explains: "In solving a problem of this sort, the grand thing is to be able to reason backward.... There are few people who, if you told them a result, would be able to evolve from their own inner consciousness what the steps were which led up to that result." Holmes is in that elite group.

Conan Doyle quickly learned that it was Holmes's deductions that were of most interest to his readers. The lengthy flashback, while a convention of popular fiction, simply distracted from readers' real focus. It is when Holmes and Watson gather before the coal fire and Holmes sums up the deductions that led him to the successful apprehension of the criminal that we are most captivated. Subsequent Holmes stories--The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, The Return of Sherlock Holmes, and The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes--rightly plunge the twosome directly into the middle of a baffling crime, piling mystery upon mystery until Holmes's denouement once more leaves the dazzled Watson murmuring, "You are wonderful, Holmes!" Generations of readers agree. --Barbara Schlieper --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From School Library Journal

Grade 7-12-In the first of the Sherlock Holmes stories, Dr. Watson, discharged from military service after suffering wounds, is at loose ends until a chance encounter leads him to take rooms with Sherlock Holmes. When Watson is drawn into the investigation of a bizarre murder in which Holmes is involved, he is unaware that it is the beginning of the most famous partnership in the history of criminal detection.
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

Conan Doyle's Hound of the Baskervilles is the best known Sherlock Holmes story.
David James Trapp
I liked this book because of the characters, how the story developed, and how it was written.
Jim Lyons
In conclusion, this is a very good mystery story that keeps you turning the pages.
Joseph J. Truncale

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

46 of 57 people found the following review helpful By C. Gonzalez on February 28, 2010
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I concur with previous reviews. Unacceptable copy as it is mising passages - as mentioned before - which creates the most confusion from the very start. Should be removed from the Amazon catalog as it is unbecoming of this vendor. SAVE YOUR TIME. DO NOT DOWNLOAD IT.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Miami Bob on July 7, 2007
Format: Paperback
Some proclaim Doyle's greatest work to be "The Hound of the Baskervilles." And, it may be just that.

Set on a British estate, mixing science fictional accounts with old wive's tales and mythology, it is not a standard tale of urban sleuthing. This involves Holmes outside of London, and working with the "plebians" or "ordinary people" in his mission to save "Sir Henry" from encountering the same fate as his uncle Sir Charles Baskerville.

There are tales of adultery, slanting lies and rendevous at late hours of the night in the moor which flanks the estate of Sir Henry. The evenings overlooking the moor are often disturbed by the noisy backdrop of a hound howling, but not the sound of a hound ever heard by anyone before.

The moor is dangerously dotted with mires in which a step could mean one's end. Muddy and deep, the step into such places becomes a trap for the unwary. Hence, the moor includes dangers beyond its sounds, it is a place where young and old should avoid unless they know which places are safe and which are not.

An entomologist named Stapleton knows the moor inside and out. He befriends Sir Henry and Watson. He cannot meet Sherlock Holmes who must stay in London for other cases. This story follows the day-to-day discoveries of Watson, more than others.

In the end, the intertwining of evil that haunts the people in the tiny hamlet becomes staggering and one must wonder - could a village of such small size really have so many people within it keeping such deadly secrets without one of the others (if not all of the others) knowing? Probably not. But, who cares.

And, I lastly note that Doyle certainly was more than a mystery writer. His prose rivals Forster or Waugh.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Paul Weiss on January 29, 2006
Format: Paperback
When Henry Baskerville, the last remaining scion of the family, travels from Canada to England to take up residence in Baskerville Hall after the puzzling violent death of his uncle, Sir Charles, he is immediately greeted with a string of baffling mysteries not the least of which is the legend of an enormous hound residing on the moors in Devon. Dr James Mortimer, family friend to the Baskervilles, engages Holmes and Watson to advise and protect Henry and to resolve the issue of the hound's existence once and for all. Not one to believe in supernatural phantoms such as this spectral hound from hell endowed with "blazing eyes and dripping jaws", Holmes dispatches Watson to scout out the terrain and place the neighbouring residents under the proverbial magnifying glass - Stapleton, the accomplished entomologist and his beautiful sister, Beryl, who attempts to warn off Henry from taking up residence in the hall; Frankland, a crotchety busybody with a telescope and his troubled daughter, Laura Lyons, recovering from an ill-advised marriage; and the Barrymores, long time butler and housekeeper to the Baskerville family, who are clearly carrying a disturbing secret of their own.

True to the well-established paradigm of the Holmes canon, Doyle allows Watson to tell the tale with a deliciously full serving of speculation, theorizing based on "incomplete data", emotion, gentlemanly bravado, flowery Victorian atmosphere, elegant dialogue, and extensive detail on the routine of daily living at the turn of the century such as communicating by telegram and traveling by coach.
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20 of 26 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on January 19, 2006
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The Baskerville family had a myth that haunted them for ages. When it finally comes true, Mr. Sherlock Holmes must come to the rescue. The Baskerville myth of a dog that kills all descendants of the Baskervilles at night on the moor has haunted the family for ages. So, when Sir Charles Baskerville is found dead on the moor, everyone assumes it was the hound. Sir Henry, who is Sir Charles' nephew, comes and inherits the estate with Holmes closely watching. Sir Henry meets the Stapletons, a young couple that are his closest neighbors, and begins to fall in love with Ms. Stapleton. Holmes puts Sir Henry's life at stake at the end of the book, and they catch the culprit in the act. This book is an excellent read that would be the perfect story to read when you can't decide between a mystery and an adventure.

This book is an example of how much Sherlock Holmes cares about other people's feelings. When Holmes sent Watson with Sir Henry to inherit the estate , he didn't tell Watson that he would follow to make sure everything was OK, which made Watson feel betrayed and not trusted. Holmes also told Watson that Cartwright had supplied all of his needs for him, which made Watson even more upset. At the end of this story, Holmes puts Sir Henry's life on the line when he lets the hound jump on Sir Henry before he kills it, petrifying Sir Henry with fear.

The antagonist is really good at disguising himself in this book. He outsmarts Sherlock Holmes in London with a full black beard, and calling himself Sherlock Homes. The Antagonist also befriends the Baskervilles so that they would never suspect him as the culprit. His plans are very smart, from bribing Sir Charles out of his house to attempting to kill Sir Henry the way back from a friendly dinner.
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