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Subversive Southerner: Anne Braden and the Struggle for Racial Justice in the Cold War South (Civil Rights and the Struggle for Black Equality in the Twentieth Century) Paperback – August 25, 2006


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Product Details

  • Series: Civil Rights and the Struggle for Black Equality in the Twentieth Century
  • Paperback: 464 pages
  • Publisher: The University Press of Kentucky (August 25, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0813191726
  • ISBN-13: 978-0813191720
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.3 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #455,182 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"David L. Hudson Jr., Nashville Tennessean" -- Anne Braden's life as a social activist spans more than half a century, and her



"Library Journal" -- Now, Fosl...gives Braden the recognition she rightly deserves.



"Her history is a proud and fascinating one.... Please read this book." -- Reverend Jesse Jackson, Sr.



""An achievement that deftly integrates biography with both regional and national history."" -- Southern Historian

Book Description

Anne McCarty Braden is a southern white woman who made a dramatic break with her native, segregationist culture in the years just following World War II to commit her life to the causes of racial and social justice. One of the few white people--particularly from the South--to join the southern black freedom movement in its nascent years in the 1950s, Braden became a role model and inspiration for the thousands of young white people that joined the mass movement a decade later. Braden's life has intersected on some level with most of the great social movements of her lifetime, and represents a central link that connects the southern protest movements of the 1930s and 1940s to the mass civil rights movement of the 1960s. Fosl not only shares the extraordinary life of Braden with her readers, but also teaches them about the struggles that white southern activists had to face in the segregated, Cold War South.
--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 16, 2003
Format: Hardcover
'Subversive Southerner' is a must-read for anyone interested in southern history or in the social and cultural upheavals of the 50s and 60s. It's a riveting story of personal transformation and courage in the face of unrelenting persecution by authorities, and a reminder of how fragile and how precious are our civil liberties. Anne Braden is a heroine-- dedicated, single-minded in her pursuit of civil rights, but compassionate and always interested in individuals. There's plenty of bombings, arrests, and HUAC subpoenas to keep you turning pages,and lots of quotes, oral-history style, from major figures from the 50s and 60s. It's well-written--Fosl is an expert interviewer and very good writer.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By E. Braden on September 24, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Excellent book regarding the life of a SOutherner. The author has done an excellent job of describing the life of Anne Braden. Mrs. Braden's life was indeed one of fighting the good fight and fighting for those who needed their voices to be heard. Ms. Fosl has done an excellent job and with much detail explaining about Mrs. Braden and her husband's Carl Braden, their passion for wanting to help with this fight of Civil Rights and rights for all humanity. I would highly recommend this book if you want to learn more about this period of history in the U.S.
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9 of 16 people found the following review helpful By David Thomson on December 26, 2002
Format: Hardcover
Anne Braden courageously opposed the Dixie segregationist establishment. She was born Anne McCarty in 1924 in "Louisville where white folks lived." Her earlier concerns were conventional and non threatening to the social mores of her Jim Crow society. Anne mostly worried about being attractive to boys during her high school years and was even willing to play dumb so as not to alienate them. She underwent a dramatic change in her early adult years while attending college and earning a living as a journalist. The Southern newspapers of that era barely considered a murdered black person worthy of mention. Blacks could fight and die in our wars, but were refused entrance to the voting booth. White criminals were afforded more respect than virtuous and law abiding Afro-Americans. The usual definition of a liberal Southern politician was someone who dared speak out against lynching while remaining firmly loyal to the principle of segregation. Anne ultimately could not make peace with the prevailing zeitgeist. She marries Carl Braden, a man named after Karl Marx. The Bradens soon partner with such luminaries like James Dombrowski, Bob Zellner and Martin Luther King. The latter remarked upon her dedication in his famous "Letter From a Birmingham Jail." Heroic self sacrifice and the constant risk of violence became an everyday reality. The odds were probably no better than fifty-fifty that the Bradens could escape being murdered.

What does the Cold War have to with Anne Braden? Why did the author choose the title "Subversive Southerner?" Catherine Fosl points out the insane eagerness of the segregationists to brand those advocating civil rights as traitors to the United States.
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