Qty:1
  • List Price: $16.95
  • Save: $6.18 (36%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 10 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by BigHeartedBooks
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Book is in very good condition, there may be some minor wear from a prior reader or two but very good books are in excellent condition. Super fast shipping is available and we offer a money back guarantee.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Successful Small-Scale Farming: An Organic Approach (Down-To-Earth Book) Paperback – January 4, 1991


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$11.34
Paperback
"Please retry"
$10.77
$2.15 $1.87

Frequently Bought Together

Successful Small-Scale Farming: An Organic Approach (Down-To-Earth Book) + Making Your Small Farm Profitable: Apply 25 Guiding Principles/Develop New Crops & New Markets/Maximize Net Profits Per Acre + Small-Scale Livestock Farming: A Grass-Based Approach for Health, Sustainability, and Profit
Price for all three: $38.13

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Series: Down-To-Earth Book
  • Paperback: 144 pages
  • Publisher: Storey Publishing, LLC; 2 edition (January 4, 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0882666428
  • ISBN-13: 978-0882666426
  • Product Dimensions: 10.9 x 8.6 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #414,593 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

When I first wrote Successful Small-Scale Farming eleven years ago, writes Karl Schwenke in the preface to this new edition, "an 'organic farmer' was synonymous with a 'lonely hippie troublemaker.' Today he is classed somewhere between a high-priced elitist and an opportunistic liar."

So begins this classic guide to organic small-scale agriculture, fully updated and revised for the 1990s -- for a new generation of readers who would like to live closer to the earth.

Successful Small-Scale Farming introduces anyone owning (or planning to own) a small farm to both the harsh realities and the real potential involved in making a full- or part-time living on the land. Karl Schwenke's clear-eyed approach to the best farming methods covers a wide range of proven techniques and practical advice, including:

* How to improve, conserve, and enrich your soil organically, to ensure the highest (and healthiest) yields.

* What machinery you'll need and how to use it.

* The best "cash crops" and specialty crops to grow for profit and how to raise them.

* How to use innovative strategies to find or create a market "niche" for your farm's crops or services.

* A concise overview of essential farmstead skills, such as haying, fencing, and managing a woodlot.

* Numerous charts and tables that put useful calculations at your fingertips.

With today's increased concern for the quality of the food we eat and the health of our environment, Successful Small-Scale Farming offers a unique and invaluable perspective on the future of agriculture. Karl Schwenke's message -- that small-scale farms can be cleaner, smarter, and more efficient than corporate agribusiness -- has never been so relevant as it is today.

About the Author

Karl Schwenke is a professional writer who lives with wife Sue on a farm in Newbury, Vermont, where they have raised strawberries, pigs and hay among other crops. Together, this couple has written the book Build Your Own Stone House, and Karl wrote the Storey title Successful Small-Scale Farming. His other work includes Sierra North and Sierra South from Wilderness Press, an organization in Berkeley, California, that he co-founded after graduating from college. Karl has also written In a Pig's Eye (Chelsea Green Publishing).

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Great reference book with lots of ideas to plan and manage your small farm, organically.
Anna
He liked this book, however hasn't yet gone through it much, so can't give you a complete picture on how helpful the book was to him.
Chaz
Windmill capacities charts, woodlot tables, densities of grain, etc.) but as far as useful farming, no.
Slippy

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

47 of 48 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 3, 1997
Format: Paperback
If you're thinking of small scale commercial farming, this is the book for you! If you know about soil and crop rotation and yields and harvest logistics, there's still plenty of information about equipment and storage and seeds and...

If you don't know about those things, this book is the place to start. With the information here and a little current market research, (ie. surf the web for 20 minutes to get prices,) you can write a complete farm business plan.
Well written, clear and to the point, it's full of tips and tricks to make your venture a success. It would be a bargain at ten times the price! (And I'm a hard grader.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
43 of 45 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on November 11, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Once you get passed the government, agri-business, and scientist bashing introduction and first chapters, this is a good overview of farming equipment and basic practices. It is written for "new farmers", "a practical resource for the beginning cash crop grower." Judging by the equipment recommendations, it is intended for farmers rather than large gardeners.

The book was almost ruined for me by comments such as "wrong headed farmers", "why soil scientists came up with such a cumbersome scale defies explanation" (referring to the logarithmic pH scale), while freely using science to support his beliefs (without citing sources or giving credit).

The book has one of the best introductory farm equipment chapters, covering the small, older tractors a beginning farmer would be able to afford, and one of the best summaries of many pieces of farm equipment, that I have read. It is worth the price alone.

It has a chapter on farming practices such as plowing, tilling, terracing, cultivating which is worth reading as well. There are rather cursory chapters on soils and plant growth. While the author obviously believes in organic and sustainable agriculture; he does little to explain it. There are two chapters analyzing various cash crops that serve as a good introduction to finding a crop to grow, including standard farm crops such as wheat and corn, and specialty crops such as berries and wood lots. The concluding chapters on the farm in general, and farm life, are also good.

I would give the book four stars, perhaps, except for the bashing mentioned above, that serves no purpose whatsoever. It is a good book for someone taking a first look at farming as a new occupation.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
51 of 54 people found the following review helpful By "manjuli" on July 15, 2000
Format: Paperback
This book is for people who either live and farm in the country already, or have some realastic experience about what it is to work for a living. Anyone who has ever tried to bring in a crop, will appreciate the down-to-earth basic information provided. If you are looking for information about how to make a pretty garden, look elsewhere. this is a not to be missed reference, right up there with your county extension agent's telephone number.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
56 of 61 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 8, 1999
Format: Paperback
Anyone owning or planning to own a small farm will find this handbook an invaluable guide to both the real potential and the harsh realities in making a full or part-time living on the land - buying land, growing and marketing your crops. Concise how-to. 134 pages.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
52 of 58 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 24, 1998
Format: Paperback
For the person unfamiliar with agriculture, this book has some value. It covers the field (pun intended) from about the 50,000 foot level. For additional information, the reader will have to get specific books on what was covered in a paragraph or two in this book.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
22 of 25 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 22, 1998
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Simply, clearly written, the book is a very practical guide for someone new to, but serious about, farming. Concise, yet still comprehensive and fun to read. Would have liked a section on draft animals, but Schwenke's disclaimer for not including it makes sense.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Amber E. Kusmenko on May 19, 2010
Format: Paperback
This book gives a lot of info on how conventional farming works. It's basically how to use conventional methods on smaller farms. Whenever he mentions organic farming he talks about how HARD it is and how there are so many PROBLEMS. He's a big complainer. The reason he sees it as hard is because he's talking about replacing conventional inputs (for example chemical fertilizers) with "organic" inputs, as if that's all there is to it. The problem is that his *thinking* is not sustainable at all, so of course his approaches are going to be trying to muscle things into working in a system where they just don't fit. The good thing about this book is it gives you a nice comparison of what conventional farming looks like.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
25 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Peter Saueracker on December 20, 2007
Format: Paperback
I was already familiar with author Schwenke from his 1975 book, Build Your Own Stone House, a product of the back-to-the-earth movement of that decade. His more recent book, Successful Small-Scale Farming, is simply too short and too thin to live up to its title, a characteristic it shares with its earlier sibling.

From its title, one would expect Schwenke's volume to present a reasonably broad overview of farm operations, concentrating on methods proven to be successful and profitable. While no one should expect a completely thorough and fully-detailed investigation of such a vast topic as farming, agronomy, and farm-business operations in one single volume, I should have known from the short length of this book, a mere 130 pages, that topics essential to its title would receive inexcusabley short shrift.

About half of Schwenke's offering is an examination of thoughts on organic farming to include an organic approach to maintaining soil and various organic cropping methods. This is all well and good, but considering this comprises only 39 pages of an already thin book, there is little reason one would not fare better buying a volume devoted solely to organic agriculture and the actual, useful detail and sophistication it would offer.

If the vestigal treatment of organic farming is insufficient reason to buy Schwenke's book, then one must conclude it would be for the depth and breadth of its exploration and analysis of successful small-scale farm techniques and operations. In this, Schwenke's attempt falls short again.

He offers a scant 12-page chapter on farm machinery, laughable in its superficial treatment of a profoundly important topic to successful farmers.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search