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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Calling All Fans
Summer of Love is an important American literary contribution that may very well have a strong and viable fan base. Where are you? Join us!
This novel is loads of fun to read. The majority of the characters are hippies from the 1960s who meet a stranger from the future who's looking to save his world. This fellow, Chiron, needs to find a troubled adolescent teen...
Published on March 7, 2002 by Ed Luhrs

versus
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Summer of Love is an amazing read. The Kindle Edition has been CHANGED
The three-star rating is for the Kindle Edition. The original story gets a five-star.

This has been one of my favourite books for a very long time. I picked up when it came out in paperback in the mid-nineties, and have re-read it many, many times. I love the story, the descriptions of the characters and the description of the Haight-Ashbury scene in the...
Published on October 29, 2011 by CherylAnn


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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Calling All Fans, March 7, 2002
By 
Ed Luhrs (Long Island, NY USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Summer of Love (Paperback)
Summer of Love is an important American literary contribution that may very well have a strong and viable fan base. Where are you? Join us!
This novel is loads of fun to read. The majority of the characters are hippies from the 1960s who meet a stranger from the future who's looking to save his world. This fellow, Chiron, needs to find a troubled adolescent teen named Susan Stein (a.k.a. Starbright) for a very compelling reason. The book has a great deal to offer: swift action, lovable characters, spiritual insight, and well-chosen primary documents such as essays, poems, and news articles which round out the reader's understanding of the worldview of the novel.
I think Summer of Love has excellent potential for a wider audience. I hope it continues to enjoy a healthy amount of sales in the used books market on this site. I wish even more for it to be in wider circulation. Some books talk about the sixties. This novel IS the sixties, thanks to the spirit and scholarship of its author. And, as one reader aptly put it, "the sci-fi stuff is just plain off the hook." Get a copy. Most people who have read it seem to respect it and enjoy it every bit as much as I do.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A well-researched Classic!, November 15, 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Summer of Love (Paperback)
I can agree with what has been written heretofore about this book. I think it's a great book. The level of character development is much higher than what we have come to expect in Scifi-Fantasy.
What I can add is that Lisa Mason has done a meticulous job of researching what the sixties were REALLY like, not the candy coated version of them which one normally sees in the media. That one could go to the Fillmore and see Quicksiver Messenger Service, Big Brother and the Holding Company, of the Jefferson Airplane, legendary groups almost any night. The idea that this quality of music would last forever. The naive optimism about the future mixed with the omnipresent paranoia about the Man or the System. The wide open experimentation with living styles. The idea that anyone who dressed like you was your brother/sister. The dark side of "free love". That someone with bell-bottomed pants and bare feet would hitchhike across the country to San Francisco with little or no money because a friend was there (somewhere) and a record said in the "Summer of Love", all you needed was a "Flower in Your Hair". The individual acts of giving and charity mixed with the fundamentally parasitic nature of the "Love" generation.
Ms Mason's love of San Francisco shines through her story so one can taste and feel "Haight Ashburg" local of the 60's.
It is a sad commentary on the publishing industry that there is a deluge of new dreck each day and by the time the word gets around that a scifi book is really exceptional, it's often out-of-print!
Let's hope the publisher returns this gem to print SOON!
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Hippies and Time Travelers, August 26, 1997
By 
dkadc@sprintmail.com (Portland, Oregon, USA) - See all my reviews
Two types of people will like this book: Hippies/wannabe hippies and Sci-Fi fans.

Some people like to read about them hippies. This books is pratically a textbook for hippie slang, hippie music, hippie clothes, hippie's nicknames for drugs, hippie lifestyle. It does not sugarcoat any of it. It just tells it like it was. Poor Starbright (aka Susan Stein) runs away from the Cleveland suburbs to find her friend Penny Lane (aka Nance Jones, aka Crinky) in the Haight-Ashbury section of San Fransisco in 1967. Along the way she tries LSD, gets pregnant, gets an abortion, drops the mod look, picks up some new vernacular, goes to enough concerts to make you jealous, and ends the book a hippie. People who like to hear about that stuff will like this book.

Some people like reading about time travelers. They want to hear Chiron Cat's Eye in Draco tell five hundred years of history from the perspective of 2467. They want to hear about him consulting the computer on his knuckletop to find whether the Prime Probability has collapsed. They like when he uses his maser and explains Cosmicism. They like the descriptions of tachyportation. They'll love this book too.

Like, wow, man, the WHOLENESS of the universe that I glimpsed while tripping on...uh...this book tells me to, like, tell ya this book is really groovy and I bet you'll really dig it, y'know what I mean??
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An appeal to sci-fi hippies of all ages, April 22, 2002
By 
S. Soper (Indiana, USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Summer of Love (Paperback)
The funky rainbow cover of this book was what caught my eye at first, then the title began to resonate in my hippie soul. Summer of Love is about a runaway girl who calls herself Starbright who goes to the Haight-Asbury district during the summer of 1967, looking for her friend Penny Lane. She meets a time traveler from five hundred years in the future, who is looking for her as the key to resolving a rift which has occured.
The vivid texturing of the historical situation at the time alone makes this book well worth the read. I also recommend the Golden Nineties as a sequel to this great book.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Tachyport to the Summer of Love, November 23, 2001
By 
Starbright, a 14-year-old runaway from suburban Ohio, spends the summer of 1967 in San Francisco, hanging out with the likes of Ruby A. Maverick, the "half Cherokee, half Haitian black, half Southern cream" owner of the Mystic Eye in the Haight-Ashbury, and Chiron Cat's Eye in Draco, a 25th-century time-traveler who needs to make sure that the Axis survives the hot dim spot of the Summer of Love. According to Tenet Five of the Grandfather Principle, Chiron can't let anyone know he's from the future, but with San Francisco full of flower children and Hells Angels, reincarnated pharoahs and men from Mars, Chiron can simply tell the truth, and people say, "Dig this," and pass the pipe.

Lisa Mason shows all sides of the Summer of Love: innocence, foolishness, mind-expansion, addiction, freedom, anarchy, loving each other, using each other, anti-capitalism, dealing, stealing, turning on, tuning in, wisdom, naivete, creativity, depravity, and all sorts of experimentation. You may both wish you'd been there and be relieved that you weren't. This is an interesting trip through 1967, with glimpses of 2467 and of the mess that the 20th century creates for the 25th and vice versa.

(Another fun trip through "the sixties": Tom Wolfe's psychedelic, journalistic novel "The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test.")
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic narrative and imagary- you feel like you're THERE., October 21, 1999
By A Customer
This is one of my all time favorite books, thanks to the amazing narrative, plot, characterization, and colorful vivid imagery. From the very first paragraph you feel as if you're really there, in San Francisco during the summer of 1967. You see, hear, smell, taste and feel everything that's happening, and there's never a dull moment with all the colorful characters. With this book there's a little something for everyone. Time travel for sci fi buffs, historical references for history buffs, and a large assortment of characters for a great story in general.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Summer of Love is an amazing read. The Kindle Edition has been CHANGED, October 29, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Summer of Love, A Time Travel (Kindle Edition)
The three-star rating is for the Kindle Edition. The original story gets a five-star.

This has been one of my favourite books for a very long time. I picked up when it came out in paperback in the mid-nineties, and have re-read it many, many times. I love the story, the descriptions of the characters and the description of the Haight-Ashbury scene in the late-sixties. I lost my paperback copy some years ago, and having switched to a Kindle, I really, really wanted this novel in the Kindle format. I was thrilled (ecstatic, actually) when I discovered it listed as a Kindle Edition. I started re-reading it the same night that I got it; despite the fact that I was in the middle of another, very good, book. I started noticing that things were different almost right away. Names have been changed, much has been left out, and other things have been added. IT IS NOT THE SAME STORY! Granted there is a page in the Kindle Edition that notes "This is an ebook adaptation of Lisa Mason's classic Summer of Love", but I am of the opinion that this is not enough of a warning to fans of the original story that this IS NOT THE SAME STORY.

***SPOILER ALERT***

Professor Zoom's "real" name in the book is Arnold, in the Kindle Edition (K.E.) it is Harold. Chiron's descriptions of "hot dim spots" and the data missing from the Archives has been whittled down to the point where that fact is not even a plot point. Starbright's Granma has died (K.E.) and not her Grandpa. It is now the Grandmother Principle (K.E.) not the Grandfather Principle. Venus Rising has had her name changed to Venus Blue (K.E.). These, and many other little changes, were fairly annoying during my re-reading of the K.E., but things that I could get used to (maybe...). What really got to me, however, is how the author/publisher, or whoever, decided that it would be a great idea to change the nature of the relationship between Starbright and Chiron. In the K.E., Chiron and Starbright fall in love and he decides that he will stay in the past! Starbright then talks him out of it.

The Kindle Edition has taken a well written, many dimensional story and turned it into a bland Novella. If you love the original, do NOT read the Kindle Edition and have that change for you.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Born in the wrong decade...shed a lot of light on my ideas, November 27, 2001
By 
This book is a wonderful book. I've read it approxiamately 5 times. I bought it about 4 years ago at a used bookstore in Ft.Worth, and fell in love with it the minute I saw it. My mom always used to tell me I was born in the wrong decade, and i believe that is true. This book was so true to life that I felt like I was there. I recommend it to anyone.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars in a time travel book, great documentation of the REAL '60s, June 6, 2010
This review is from: Summer of Love, A Time Travel (Kindle Edition)
I think it's a great book. The level of character development is much higher than what we have come to expect in Scifi-Fantasy.

Most books on the late sixties are distorted nonsense. Hippies sitting around a campfire singing kumbaya. Lisa Mason has done a meticulous job of researching what the sixties were REALLY like, not the normal candy-coated version of them usually presented. To research this book Lisa Mason read 1967-68 back issues of the Berkley Barb and other Bay Area sixties publications. The "psychedelic" sixties were far different from the way they are normally portrayed, both in movies and books.

In 1967, one could go to the Fillmore and see The Doors, The Quicksilver Messenger Service, Big Brother and the Holding Company, The Mamas and the Papas, the Jefferson Airplane, The Grateful Dead, HP Lovecraft, legendary groups almost any night. Of the bands would just go set up in Golden Gate Park (Haight-Asbury, at the end of Haight Street) and give a free concert just because they felt like it! There was an assumption that this quality of music would last forever. There was a naive optimism about the future mixed with the omnipresent paranoia about the Man or the System. The wide open experimentation with drugs and life styles. The idea that anyone who dressed like you was your brother/sister. If you just had long hair, you were a member of a worldwide fraternity. "Summer of Love" shows the bright happy free side of the Summer of Love, but also the dark side of "free love". Someone with bell-bottomed pants and bare feet might hitchhike across the country to San Francisco with little or no money because a friend was there (somewhere) and a record said in the "Summer of Love", all you needed was a "Flower in Your Hair". There were individual & local acts of giving and charity: The Diggers, the Haight-Asbury Free Clinic, the Hashbury shop owner who gives Starbright a place to stay. These were mixed with the fundamentally unsupportable nature of the "Love" generation, soon to collapse at Altamont. "Love" Street (not Haight Street) was more and more filled with a tidal wave of penniless, idealistic, escapist hippies looking for a good time (free of parents, the war and responsibility), free drugs, free food, places to crash. And Cops and Narcs itching to bust them. Others hippies ready to steal from them. Character "Penny Lane" finds out the hard way about the darker side of life and the Summer of Love, "Starbright", who comes to find her, does better with the help of "Chiron Cat Eye in Draco". He is tackyported from the future to watch over her and has to be extra careful not to affect events which could redirect or diddle with the future. He brings a "knuckletop" computer with 3D holographic keyboard!

Ms Mason's love of San Francisco shines through her story so one can taste and feel "Haight Ashbury" local of the 60's. Walk thru Haight-Ashbury today, you can still almost feel vibes of the "Summer of Love". This is what it was really like.

One of the greatest sci-fi books ever written, but more than that, one of the most authentic historical novels ever written about 1967 (even if it does borrow a bit from the Terminator)! Starts a bit slow, but don't get confused. Persist.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One small strange trip into the past, one long strange trip from the future, June 24, 2007
Teenage Susan Stein, aka Starbright, runs away from middle-class Midwestern suburbia and uses her savings to fly to San Francisco in the first days of summer, 1967. (Interestingly, I began reading this book a few days before the media began hyping the 40th anniversary of this strange fleeting season called the Summer of Love.) Beckoned by a postcard from her old friend Nance, now calling herself Penny Lane, she has traveled to the City by the Bay to escape her parents' constant bickering and to reconnect with her old friend. In one of the most uncannily accurate portrayals of an LSD experience, she is thrown into the ecstatically, erratically archetypal lifestyle of sex, drugs, and rock & roll. She also becomes pregnant. Starbright accidentally comes across Penny Lane only to find that the young girl is now cynical, bitter, and self-destructive. Her friend confesses that her life has been one of absolute hell, as she was regularly raped by her stepfather and ignored by her mother. Not being as well-off as Starbright, Penny has had to sleep her way across the US in order to get away from his advances, and resents the fact that her once-best friend has somehow escaped all this, and was even able to fly to San Francisco thanks to her rich daddy. Starbright watches Penny, who is still basically a child, descend further and further into the dark side of 1967--speed, prostitution, biker culture, and death.

Into this time of upheaval tachyports Chiron Cat's Eye in Draco, a young man from 500 years in the future. He has come back in time to the Summer of Love in order to find a mysterious young woman, known only through a few seconds of recovered video footage and a lot of probabilities. His job is to find this girl, protect her, and ensure that events unfold as they are supposed to, so that the existence of his future will be assured. The girl's name is not known to him; what is known is that she is pregnant, that her pregnancy is important to the future of humanity, and that demonic anti-matter forces from an alternate timeline are seeking to destroy her. As a time traveler capable of producing profound paradoxes, he is bound by an incredibly strict code of noninterference called the Grandfather Principle. He meets and befriends Starbright, whom he suspects is his mystery woman, and Ruby A. Maverick, the gorgeous 35-year old proprietor of an occult bookshop. Over the course of the novel, he reveals both the daunting shape of the future--sharing tales of overpopulation, ozone depletion, genetic mutations, and devolution--and Starbright's role, through her unborn daughter, in assisting humanity to survive the coming transitions. Alas, things are never as easy as they seem, especially when time travel and the (pardon the pun) embryonic women's reproductive freedom movement are involved, and so Chiron and Starbright have their work cut out for them.

This novel was a joy to read. Although I wasn't around for the Summer of Love (and so can't vouch for the book's veracity), the story conveys such a complex mixture of innocence, hope, joy, exuberance, ecstasy, revelation, chaos, despair, freefall, nihilism, and violence that I can't help but suspect its authenticity. It reveals the same multifaceted, ambiguous "60s" as the Love album *Forever Changes,* and that makes it seem straight from the source. As well, the use of regular references to newspaper clippings from *The Berkeley Barb* and *The Oracle,* sections from the *I-Ching,* and tidbits about environmental science rounded out this loving, and knowing, portrait of the Left Coast in `67. Finally, Starbright's regular references to Star Trek were a loving homage to that groundbreaking show; as I read the book, I realized how much that program, and the increased interest in SF that accompanied it, inspired the progressive and outlandish thinking of many young people at the time, including most likely the author herself.
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