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Summer Sanctuary Paperback – May 1, 2010


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 193 pages
  • Publisher: Luminis Books, Inc.; 1 edition (May 1, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1935462342
  • ISBN-13: 978-1935462347
  • Product Dimensions: 0.6 x 5.5 x 7.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #886,890 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Laurie Gray earned her B.A. from Goshen College and her J.D. from Indiana University School of Law. Between college and law school, she taught high school Spanish, working summers as an interpreter in Guatemala. An experienced trial attorney and child advocate, Laurie is the founder of Socratic Parenting LLC (SocraticParenting.com). Laurie@ debut novel Summer Sanctuary received a Moonbeam Gold Medal for excellence in young adult fiction and was named a 2011 Indiana Best Book Finalist. She has two additional novels and a parenting book scheduled for publication through Luminis Books: Maybe I Will (2013), Just Myrto (2014), and A Simple Guide to Socratic Parenting (2014). In addition to writing, speaking and consulting through Socratic Parenting LLC, Laurie works as an adjuct professor of criminal sciences at Indiana Tech and as a bilingual forensic interviewer at the Dr. Bill Lewis Center for Children in Fort Wayne, IN.

More About the Author

Laurie Gray earned her B.A. from Goshen College and her J.D. from Indiana University School of Law. Between college and law school, she taught high school Spanish, working summers as an interpreter in Guatemala. An experienced trial attorney and child advocate, Laurie is the founder of Socratic Parenting LLC (www.SocraticParenting.com). Laurie's debut novel Summer Sanctuary received a Moonbeam Gold Medal for excellence in young adult fiction and was named a 2011 Indiana Best Book Finalist. She has two additional novels and a parenting book scheduled for publication through Luminis Books: Maybe I Will (2013), Just Myrto (2014), and A Simple Guide to Socratic Parenting (2014). In addition to writing, speaking and consulting through Socratic Parenting LLC, Laurie works as an adjunct professor of criminal sciences at Indiana Tech and as a bilingual forensic interviewer at the Dr. Bill Lewis Center for Children in Fort Wayne, Indiana.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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See all 21 customer reviews
Very well written and I thoroughly enjoyed it.
Doris Jecminek
Summer Sanctuary is a warm and tender story of two teens who find true friendship in a world that is often much too harsh.
Alice Berger
It is VERY well written, and poses so many delicious chances for the reader to expand his or her mind.
Kelly L. Mikel

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By onyx95 on June 25, 2010
Format: Paperback
Facing a summer without his best friend, Matthew decided on a summer project using the speed of light and the theory of relativity to try and prove his own theory about the dilation of time. Using the library resources on a daily basis to prove his theory, he met a girl that turns out didn't really have anyplace to live or anyone to watch over her for a while. Sharing lunch with Dinah everyday, he would bring sandwiches and she would contribute anything she could find, even if it came from the supermarket dumpster. Wanting to help, he found a way to get her a warm, dry and safe place to stay - in his church basement. Discovering a friend who had a different back ground, a different family dynamic and outlook on life was one way for them both to grow and learn about thing from astrophysics to poetry, from each other and from themselves.

The tenderness and the acceptance that these kids show each other is very touching. If only there were more people that could be so different from each other and yet still help one another learn from those differences. This is a quick and easy story to read, it did have a lot of sitting around a tree talking, some religious overtones (Matthews father is a preacher), a little science and even some music. These kids are gentle and kind, they show warmth and encouragement and all of this in a young, pre-teen boy who is finding his own heart full of friendship and good will toward someone he has only just met. Sad is some parts but over all an uplifting story that could be read by any age group. The science gets a bit technical in places and then the end is abrupt, leaving just a small piece of me wondering if that was it.
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14 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Cas on October 7, 2012
Format: Paperback
Valiant attempt, but it's more gospel garble than fiction. Thinly veiled evangelism, with puppets as characters, predictable plot, and about as much insight into the complexities of children's emotional lives as a Sunday school pablum.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Alice Berger on November 30, 2010
Format: Paperback
Matthew's best friend, Kyle, has gone away to spend the summer at a farm. His younger brother has reached a growth spurt and is now bigger than he is. And his mom is pregnant. Again. Since Matthew is being home-schooled, he doesn't even get the summers off, and he has to write a research paper on Einstein's Theory of Relativity. It was going to be the worst summer ever - until he met Dinah.

Dinah is on the run from Child Welfare, waiting for her mom to come home and get her. But until then she needs a place to hang out and hide. Matthew takes an instant liking to Dinah, and offers her his friendship and a sanctuary. The two new friends share ideas, laughter, music and companionship over the next few weeks, forging a strong bond in the process.

Matthew never expects to get so close to this homeless girl, and their time spent together is all too brief. Will they stay in touch by email, as Dinah suggests, or will time apart bring inevitable distance? But in the moments they do have together, they touch each other in ways neither could anticipate.

Summer Sanctuary is a warm and tender story of two teens who find true friendship in a world that is often much too harsh. Matthew and Dinah are interesting and deep characters, and I enjoyed getting to know them both. I highly recommend this beautiful story for all who long to still find caring and goodness in humanity.

Reviewer: Alice Berger
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer VINE VOICE on May 14, 2010
Format: Paperback
My Take: I really enjoyed this book. I was curious about it when I first read the summary because I homeschool my daughter and homeschooled my two older children all the way through school. Beside a few spots where the author made Matthew a little naive ( seemed that he was that way because of his being homeschooled, Most homeschooled children that I know are more away of the entire world than the average child their age) I thought that the author portrayed a homeschooled child very well.

I was touched my how willing that Matthew was to watch after Dinah and how he tried to come up with solutions to her problems. They made a fine team. I was disappointed that he felt he needed to hide Dinah from his parents because I am sure that something could have been worked out that she wouldn't of had to go into child welfare.

Over all I thought this was a very enjoyable books and I am going to give it to my daughter to read next.
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Format: Paperback
Laurie Gray's Summer Sanctuary is a wonderfully moving story in which both the shy and studious Matthew and the worldly and tomboyish Dinah grow up so much in just a few short weeks. Matthew meets Dinah, whom he originally thought was a boy, at the library, when she takes his half-eaten lunch out of the trash can and eats it. He's watching from a window inside the library.

While Matthew is intrigued by this girl who has eaten from the trash, Dinah is extremely hesitant to tell her story the first time they talk, but by the next day, she obviously needs someone to confide in - and Matthew seems like he can keep a secret.

Dinah, waiting on her mother to get out of a stint in jail, leaves the apartment they share with her mother's boyfriend after he asks Dinah to replace her mother in the bedroom. She has no place to go, so she's been sleeping wherever she can lay her head down.

Matthew's father is the preacher of the nearby church, and he has an idea that Dinah can sleep in the church basement at night, and leave early each morning. Of course Dinah likes the idea since her other option is to sleep outside in the park.

Dinah teaches Matthew how she has been able to survive for the past 10 days on her own, outside. He's a friend when she needs one the most - who won't tell his parents and get child services involved. She's there to encourage him when he's feeling depressed over his friend being gone for the summer and his mother being pregnant - for the fifth.

He's the piano player who has taken lessons to be as good as he is. She's the harmonicist who can't read music and is able to play by ear. He's the 13-year old homeschooled student who has decided to study "time dilation and the speed of light" over the summer.
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