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Summer's Bloodiest Days: The Battle of Gettysburg as Told from All Sides Hardcover – June 8, 2010


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"Castle Hangnail" by Ursula Vernon
From the creator of "Dragonbreath" comes a tale of witches, minions, and one fantastic castle, just right for fans of Roald Dahl and Tom Angleberger. See more

Product Details

  • Age Range: 10 and up
  • Grade Level: 5 and up
  • Hardcover: 64 pages
  • Publisher: National Geographic Children's Books; Reprint edition (June 8, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1426307071
  • ISBN-13: 978-1426307072
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 0.5 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.1 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #9,195,871 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Gr 4-7–Pulling readers headlong into the sights, sounds, and smells of the battle at Gettysburg, Weber paints a picture, rich in descriptive detail, of terrifying encounters, exhausted soldiers, and tedious waiting mixed with chaos and confusion. She outlines how this decisive showdown was actually more happenstance than strategy, and how General Lee's defeat here, while it did not end the war, put him and the Southern army on the defensive for the next two years, never allowing them to gain back an advantage. While the three-day battle is described chronologically, the author begins with Lincoln's famous address at the dedication of the memorial cemetery and then provides some context for the war, its causes, and basic highlights up until those fateful days in early July. The narration is occasionally confusing as it hops between the Northern and Southern perspectives as well as explaining troop movements, various commanders, regiments, and locations in and around Gettysburg. The text is interspersed with bits of first-person accounts, original photographs, and reprints of flyers and other primary-source material that make it an invaluable resource for students and teachers. A detailed time line, websites, and a bibliography are useful additions. Font sizes for captions and sidebars are small, which can be distracting, but overall this is an attractive, informative account of an important American event.–Jody Kopple, Shady Hill School, Cambridge, MA. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

From Booklist

This colorful book tells of the Battle of Gettysburg, a dramatic event that becomes even more compelling because the text is laced with pertinent quotes from those who were there. Weber’s vivid, pithy writing packs a great deal of information and many anecdotes into a relatively short account. A time line of the Civil War, a list of recommended websites, a bibliography, and a list of sources for quotes are appended. Most double-page spreads include a pull-out snippet of text, sometimes beginning or ending in midsentence, printed in all caps, and, even more distracting, in two different sizes of enlarged, bold type. Though this and certain other aspects of page design draw the eye away from the main text, other elements work quite successfully: many battle maps, short, informative sidebars, and the use of modern realistic paintings and photos of artifacts as well as period photographs to illustrate the book. A lively addition to history collections. Grades 5-8. --Carolyn Phelan --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Thomas A. Fenton on October 22, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Basically a table top book, Jennifer L. Weber's work is of great interest to high school age students, and even to some of us who are interested in deeper studies on history. Having read (literally) nineteen other books on the civil war era, I found this one interesting and helpful on two levels:

First, it is a brief overview of a three day battle which usually occupies so many pages, and provides so many details and facts that some of the story gets lost, as in "you can't see the forest for the trees." The value of an overview is that it provides a view you don't get otherwise.

Second, it is sprinkled with interesting minor details that are forgotten in the deeper study. For example, we learn that Union General Daniel Sickles' amputated leg is on display, bone only of course, in the National Museum of Health and Medicine. We are shown a picture of a cipher disc used by signalmen of both armies. We are treated to pictures of weapons and ammunition used during the war. We see art painted to illustrate to the news hungry public what was happening, including a painting of how Gen. Lewis Armistead led his men into battle with his hat on the end of his sword so he could be seen, an act that endangered his own life by calling the enemy's attention to him as well. These and other usually unmentioned details may not be of much overall value in understanding the deeper story behind Gettysburg, but they add interest and a certain level of fascination with history for those not yet caught up in the subject as I am.

Weber has included, as well as period art, available photographs and illustrations designed to enhance the reader's experience. I was well pleased with the entire experience of reading this book.
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