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Sun City

4.9 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews

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Audio CD, January 29, 1993
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Track Listings

Disc: 1

  1. Sun City
  2. No More Apartheid
  3. Revolutionary Situation
  4. Sun City (Version II)
  5. Let Me See Your I.D.
  6. The Struggle Continues
  7. Silver & Gold
  8. Sun City (The Last Remix)


Product Details

  • Audio CD (January 29, 1993)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Razor & Tie
  • ASIN: B000002Z7F
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #284,024 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

5 star
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4 star
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3 star
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
Just a quick heads up to fans of this great song and album. The complete album plus some remixes are now available on iTunes for only $3.99. Get it now, before someone important changes their mind. Stop paying ridiculous amounts of money (that would include triple digits for the CD). I'm as capitalist as the next guy, but enough is enough. It's not like the sellers here are donating mass amounts of their profit to the cause. Peace.

UPDATE JULY 2010: Sadly, it appears that the album has been removed from the ITMS. I'm not sure when this took place, but truly sad and frustrating for music fans everywhere.
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Format: Audio CD
I originally purchased this recording as a vinyl record in 1985. Being a fan of Little Steven, Bruce Springsteen, Bob Dylan, and Pat Benatar, I was interested in what the song would sound like. The information I got with the album about apartheid really open my eyes to a problem that though half a world away, threatened the very fabric of what my own country was founded on. The music on the recording is very moving. The title cut, "Sun City", combines recording artists from across the genres or rock, rap, and soul in a truly inspiring work of art. Little Steven and his group of engineers managed to find great combinations of voices that bring the music to life. To this day, this is one of my favorite songs. Not just because of the artists involved, but because this song truly means something.
There are other accounts of apartheid on this album as well that make this a well-rounded style-crossing album that is not just a compliation of previously recorded material.
If this recording interests you you would be well advised to look into Little Steven's other albums, Voice of America, Men Without Women, and Freedom - No Compromise. Also listen to Bruce Springsteen's The Ghost of Tom Joad. All of these albums have very moving accounts of our society and the darker sides of the people in it.
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Format: Vinyl
In 1971 George Harrison got the ball rolling with the Concert for Bangladesh and, over time other artists lent their talent for causes as well. Sun City, a delightfully militant, serious, cutting edge and probably the grittiest, most spirited effort kicked off the summer of 1985.

Although I never liked the song "We Are the World," I fully supported the artists and rationale behind it. I didn't like that one because I felt the melody was maudlin and I didn't like the way it made me feel.

"Sun City" on the other hand is in-your-face politics and a rallying cry and banners being waved. It is a demand for the end of Apartheid in South Africa and a refusal to play venues that support Apartheid beliefs. Apartheid was notorious for the white-minority government, which was established in 1948. A myriad of talented artists including Little Steven, Ruben Blades, Bruce Springstein, Ringo Starr, Pete Townshend and many others poke their finger in the Apartheid eye with this in your face, militant anti-war and pro-humanitarian rights cry. This is a very serious, intense song that will make you want to dance as well! It will certainly arouse your social conscience!

The three versions of this wonderful song all stay true to the core melody. There are variations in the lyrics and one version alternates with verses of "we are the world," which I don't feel is as good as the other versions of this intensely stellar song.

Be sure to check out "No More Apartheid." Peter Gabriel's strong vocals ring out deep and pure and the message could not be made plainer. "Revolutionary Situation," is a musical montage replete with news clips; excerpts from songs and other revolutionary anthems.
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Format: Audio CD
The Concert for Bangladesh may have been the start of benefit albums, and for a worthy cause. Sun City though, was the most militant, and demonstrated that rock and roll was about rebellion, not the Twisted Sister "We're Gonna Take It" or the whiny punk rock "I don't wanna..." attitude, but about social protest. The Sun City album took on the humanitarian crimes (read human rights violations, lack of voting rights, "relocation to phony homelands") committed by the white-minority government of South Africa from 1948, when the policy of apartheid (rhymes with both white and hate) was first introduced. Steve Van Zandt, late of the E Street Band and Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes, produced and organized this indictment of the totalitarian regime. The title refers to a whites-only "Vegas in the desert" entertainment resort symbolizing the privileges of the white minority.
There are three versions of the title song, of which the opening track is the original. "Rockers and rappers united and strong" take turns singing the verses a la We Are The World, condemning Reagan's "quiet diplomacy" and phony homelands like Bophuthatswana. Pete Townshend's guitar, Ringo Starr's drums, Clarence Clemons' saxophone, and Miles Davis's trumpet contribute to the backing instrumentation.
The droning guitar and Peter Gabriel's wailing vocals form "No More Apartheid." That is followed by "Revolutionary Situation," a collage of music, bits of audio from press statements, and other revolutionary anthems compiled and edited by Keith LeBlanc and the News Dissector. Sounds of barking police dogs, protesters calling for both peace and violence, audio bits from Nelson Mandela, Piet Botha, and Ronald Reagan are put together.
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