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  • Sunday Bloody Sunday (The Criterion Collection) [Blu-ray]
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Sunday Bloody Sunday (The Criterion Collection) [Blu-ray]


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Region 28121 encoding. (This DVD will not play on most DVD players sold in the US or Canada [Region 1]. This item requires a region specific or multi-region DVD player and compatible TV. More about DVD formats)
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Product Details

  • Actors: Glenda Jackson, Peter Finch, Murray Head, Peggy Ashcroft, Maurce Denham
  • Directors: John Schlesinger
  • Writers: Penelope Gilliatt
  • Producers: Joseph Janni
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Blu-ray, NTSC, Special Edition, Subtitled, Widescreen
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region A/1 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.66:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: Unrated
  • Studio: The Criterion Collection
  • DVD Release Date: October 23, 2012
  • Run Time: 110 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (38 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B008MPQ0N6
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #198,552 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Special Features

  • New high-definition digital restoration, supervised by director of photography Billy Williams, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray edition
  • New video interviews with actor Murray Head, Williams, and production designer Luciana Arrighi
  • Illustrated 1975 audio interview with director John Schlesinger
  • New interview with writer William J. Mann (Edge of Midnight: The Life of John Schlesinger) about the making of Sunday Bloody Sunday
  • New interview with photographer Michael Childers, Schlesinger’s longtime partner
  • Trailer
  • PLUS: A booklet featuring essays by film critic Terrence Rafferty and cultural historian Ian Buruma, as well as screenwriter Penelope Gilliatt’s 1971 introduction to the film’s screenplay

  • Editorial Reviews

    John Schlesinger followed his Academy Award–winning Midnight Cowboy with this sophisticated and highly personal take on love and sex. Sunday Bloody Sunday depicts the romantic lives of two Londoners, a middle-aged doctor and a prickly thirtysomething divorcée—played by Oscar winners Peter Finch (Network) and Glenda Jackson (Women in Love)—who are sleeping with the same handsome young artist (Murray Head). A revelation in its day, this may be the 1970s’ most intelligent, multitextured film about the complexities of romantic relationships; it is keenly acted and sensitively directed, from a penetrating screenplay by novelist and critic Penelope Gilliatt.

    Customer Reviews

    We have a choice in life, we can accept or reject compromise.
    C. B Collins Jr.
    The simple, yet powerfully suggestive emotions Jackson offers do much to help us identify strongly with her character.
    RALPH PETERS
    These 3 people are trying to figure out the love thing, but there are complications lol, just like in reality.
    Elkman

    Most Helpful Customer Reviews

    63 of 66 people found the following review helpful By RALPH PETERS on September 22, 2003
    Format: DVD Verified Purchase
    While I concur with many of the reviews posted here, there is not enough praise bestowed on the sublime Glenda Jackson, who remains the great lost actress of her generation. Though the recipient of two Oscars ("Women In Love", "A Touch of Class") and two other nominations ("Sunday.." and "Hedda"), as well as a criminal snub for the landmark "Stevie", Ms. Jackson seems to be little remembered today. It seems inconceivable now, since in the early Seventies, only Jane Fonda and Vanessa Redgrave could be considered her equals. For me, her Alex in "Sunday, Bloody Sunday" is my favorite of her rich performances. She is conflicted with her obviously unsatisfying affair with her bisexual (and, more importantly, shallow) lover, unfulfilled at her job, and basically adrift, just marking time in her life. The simple, yet powerfully suggestive emotions Jackson offers do much to help us identify strongly with her character. Who hasn't felt that, at times, their life is merely counting days, waiting for weekends which ironically do little to feed our spiritual or emotional needs? And the pattern continues, which to me is what the somewhat cryptic title implies. So much pressure is put on "the weekends" to make us happy that we can easily just wish our lives away, as Alex seems to. Its hard to find the final straw which Alex finds to salvage her life and begin again without this crippling relationship, but Jackson's brilliantly layered performance is a wonder throughout. Mr. Finch received many plaudits and is very respectable, but seems to be playing it safe here. His Dr. Hirsch is supposed to be the emotional, reasonable center of the movie, but Finch is a bit too reserved; the events don't seem to really happen to him at all.Read more ›
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    38 of 39 people found the following review helpful By H. F. Corbin TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on July 25, 2003
    Format: VHS Tape
    For over thirty years SUNDAY BLOODY SUNDAY has remained one of my favorite movies. John Schlesinger may be my favorite director. I believe I own all his movies save one. So I probably cannot be objective about either this movie or Mr. Schlesinger's greatness.
    I understood how my black students felt when they saw SOUNDER for the first time when I saw this movie on its release in 197l. "At last here is a decent movie about us." Not only was the movie about bisexual and gay relationships, but the characters were richly and complexly developed. In a word, believable. The plot is rather straight-forward-- the screen play is by Penelope Gilliatt--Alex played by Glenda Jackson is having an affair with Bob who is played by Murray Head who is having an affair also with Dr. Daniel Hirsch played by Peter Finch. Rod Steiger may have preempted Peter Finch and Murray Head with a kiss on the lips between males in THE SERGEANT, but the kiss between Finch and Head here was certainly well ahead of its time.
    The movie is visually very beautiful and well put together. The film opens with a closeup of the hands of Dr. Finch who is examining an older male patient. We see similar scenes throughout the movie of closeups of both Jackson's hands as she makes love to Head and Finch's hands as well. Much is made of answering services and phone messages since Alex and Dr. Hirsch have to share Bob and often have to be satisfied with phone messages rather than him in the flesh. (We can all be thankful this movie was made years before the advent of mobile phones.
    Read more ›
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    20 of 20 people found the following review helpful By klavierspiel VINE VOICE on December 7, 2001
    Format: VHS Tape Verified Purchase
    This tale of an unconventional love triangle looks better and better three decades after its release. John Schlesinger's filming of Penelope Gilliatt's screenplay preserves the brilliant performances of Peter Finch and Glenda Jackson, as a man and a woman reluctantly sharing the affections of a another, younger man, Murray Head (whatever happened to him?). What continues to surprise and delight is, most of all, the quiet acknowledgment that different kinds of love can co-exist, each having its own validity, without angst, guilt or retribution. If anything, general cinema has moved backwards since this film in terms of portraying homosexuality and bisexuality in a mature, non-exploitive manner. Ultimately, it's the acting of Finch and Jackson that makes this film, making one regret more than ever their respective death and retirement--in particular, Finch's moving closing speech, made directly to the camera, remains a masterpiece of understated delivery.
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    18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 30, 2003
    Format: VHS Tape
    John Schlesinger's film, from an original screenplay by Penelope Gilliatt (the brilliiant film critic for the New Yorker, novelist, short story writer, playwright, opera librettist, and profilist), is the director's finest work. (FYI: there is no comma in the title "Sunday Bloody Sunday.") Schlesinger asked Gilliatt to write the script because he thought she was the "right" writer; also, the screeenplay is also largely inspired by Gilliatt's novel "A State of Change."
    The 1971 film remains today the finest work ever to deal with gay or bisexual characters. The milieu is educated and upper-crust London and Londoners, in the period after the sixties. The landmark quality of the film is that it assumes viewers are intelligent as the characters on display. There's no big deal at all made of the characters' sexual orientations -- they simply are. Gilliatt wanted to write a film about the "possibility" of people who love each other finding the courage to move on in their lives once a relationship has ended -- for whatever reason -- with compassion and charity toward each other. The film is about different kinds of breakdown in communication, about surviving on less and less, about clinging to the possibility of hope in extremity. The film ends on a positive note -- it sees courage in the everday, in moving ahead with one's life. The credit must go to Gilliatt. Schlesinger directed, but the soul of the film is Gilliatt's much-honored screenplay.
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