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Super Slow: The Ultimate Exercise Protocol Paperback – May 1, 1992


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 195 pages
  • Publisher: Media Support; 2 edition (May 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0963319906
  • ISBN-13: 978-0963319906
  • Product Dimensions: 10.7 x 8.4 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (32 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,593,474 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

74 of 76 people found the following review helpful By Lewis Gainor on May 15, 2000
Format: Paperback
Let's be blunt: Reading this book is not fun, nor is it easy. Like most exercise philosophy books, it is filled with psuedo-intellectual jargon. BUT, if you can stomach reading it, you can do something that will really change your body. SuperSlow has worked wonders for me, but only because I let go of my prior understandings of what it means to exercise. For SuperSlow to work for you, you must do the same: follow all the instructions given in the book. Don't lie to yourself-if you change the program, customizing it to what you think is the "optimal" workout routine, it WILL NOT work for you. If you consider the author's argument open-mindedly, you just might come to agree with him (as I do) and admit that you never knew what you were doing during exercise beforehand. I am not being paid for this, but I am writing because of the contempt I have for the meatheads in the gym who want your money. SAVE YOURSELF! SuperSlow works because it is hard and painful, but that is the only exercise that gets results. There are no 8 minute solutions to fitness, and SuperSlow will help you to understand why. Moreover, you will gain a real appreciation of safety in the gym (I am a limber 23 years old, and I will never touch free weights again-I don't need to). Again, don't lie to yourself-if you don't do SuperSlow right, it won't work for you. Follow the program. Rest as much as possible. Inroad as far as you can tolerate. Don't lie to yourself.
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59 of 60 people found the following review helpful By metrodave@aol.com on March 1, 1999
Format: Paperback
This book is incredible. If you are looking for a better way to exercise, and have been searching beyond the gym rats and club owners viewpoint, this book will give you the knowledge that you so earnestly have sought out. When I "stumbled" upon the SuperSlow principles, and their website I was quickly drawn to this book. Upon obtaining this book I read it in one weekend, and couldn't wait to get back in the "gym" (and out in 30 minutes) with the "best" workout I ever experienced. Ken Hutchins efforts and persistence to detail may not be appreciated by most, but those that really care about themselves, and value their time and well-being will look upon this body of work with much appreciation and relevance. To me the cost of $25 and the time spent reading it has paid off 10,000-fold in time and health. What great satisfaction to understand one's body, and be proud of not wasting one's time. This is the book that has advanced the curretn mainstream of High Intensity Strength Training to a level of acceptance that is nothing short of a revolution evolving beyond Zander, Jones, Darden, and Mentzer, and developing more detailed insights by "newcomers" such as Ryan, Hahn, McGuff, and Baye.
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235 of 259 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 15, 2000
Format: Paperback
OK, I love HIT. I love HIT and especially hardgainer. I think they're the best two ways to train, and I get the best results from these approaches. I've had Superslow (HIT) for a while, tried it, and suprise suprise, it worked.
But I still won't recommend it.
Here's why:
-There's very little training information. How could there be when the whole protocol can be summed up in two pages?
-Ken Hutchkins isn't all too honest. He makes up things to support his beliefs at times. (In other words he bases his claims on assumptions that are, well, WRONG!) For example, his section on aerobics is just hot air. He comes with a laughable theory (The heart must go to failure to get stronger. Therefore, to strengthen the heart, have heart attacks.) Then he denies the contrary evidence (Aerobics have been proven to affect the heart.) by saying it doesn't exist.
-The guy's a salesman, not a lifter. He spends 190 pages selling you his theory (or book), 10 pages teaching you how to train. If you want a book that's mostly theory, very little action, or all show, no go, this book is for you.
-If you're unfamiliar with HIT or hardgainer, this isn't the book to get if you want to build a solid foundation. How could it be, when it's specifically about a derivation of HIT?
Because SS's about a derivation of training and not about training itself, there's no section on diet, nutrition, sleep, goal setting or other PRACTICAL concerns. Just a lot of theory...
OK, with that said, the routines and training inside this book work. The advantages of going this slow are 1) no warmups, 2) increased recovery and safety while training to total failure. It'll work as good as anything else, but it's not the only way.
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77 of 85 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 2, 2001
Format: Paperback
This book is boring! And it doesn't say much. It takes Ken H. 200 pages to tell you, "Go slow!" If you want to learn about Superslow, get Brawn 1 instead. It has three pages on Superslow; that alone sums up about 90% of this book. The other 220 pages go far beyond the its scope.
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30 of 31 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 4, 2002
Format: Paperback
All other reviews of this book are valid. Yes, it is too long for the amount of information it presents. However, Ken Hutchins does bring together in one place some information about SuperSlow(TM)that is only available in separate places otherwise.
Hutchins is opinionated and biased -- obviously from the title "...Ultimate Exercise Protocol". If you have never tried SuperSlow, this is your chance to read what its chief proponent has to say about it. If you lift weights at all, you owe it to yourself to give SuperSlow a six-week trial to see how your body responds to it and add it to your repertoire of weight training inside secrets. I guess the real question is whether you think the book is worth $25. If you've been training for a while and know a bench press from a deadlift, the lack of exercise descriptions that is found in most beginner weight training texts won't bother you. But if you don't know what ratcheting or intramuscular friction is, then you'll probably appreciate this book.
That said, the book should be retitled Ulimate WEIGHT TRAINING Protocol. Super Speed reps, CAT (Compensatory Acceleration Training), "train fast to be fast", etc. all advocate a misuse of a weights. Momentum, inertia, and the deceleration necessary to keep the weights from flying across the gym make the idea of fast reps stupid. Studies of using weighted objects to train for speed have shown that the object has to be released or actually thrown to produce the maximum speed gain.
Another school of thought is to use weights at a slow to moderate speed to first build enough strength to generate the force necessary to produce adequate acceleration. After that or simultaneously practice the skill at which speed is desired. This, to me, seems more sensible.
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