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Superman - Action Comics Vol. 3: At The End Of Days (The New 52) Paperback – July 29, 2014


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Product Details

  • Series: Superman-Action Comics
  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: DC Comics; 52nd edition edition (July 29, 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1401246060
  • ISBN-13: 978-1401246068
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 1 x 0.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #782,328 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

GRANT MORRISON is known for his innovative work on comics from the graphic novel ARKHAM ASYLUM to acclaimed runs on ANIMAL MAN and DOOM PATROL, as well as his subversive creator owned titles such as THE INVISIBLES, SEAGUY, JOE THE BARBARIAN and WE3. He has also written best-selling runs on JLA, SEVEN SOLDIERS OF VICTORY and New X-Men and recently helped to reinvent the DC Universe in ALL-STAR SUPERMAN, 52, BATMAN and JOE THE BARBARIAN. He is currently writing both SUPERMAN: ACTION COMICS and BATMAN, INCORPORATED as a part of DC COMICS--THE NEW 52.

More About the Author

Grant Morrison is one of comics' greatest innovators. His long list of credits includes Batman: Arkham Asylum, JLA, Seven Soldiers, Animal Man, Doom Patrol, The Invisibles and The Filth. He is currently writing Batman and All-Star Superman.

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
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See all 9 customer reviews
And even then, the story is so without focus that you still won't be enjoying it by the third.
by Dustin
When I finished reading it at the last issues release I sat down the next week and started with (the equivalent in trade) Volume 1 first issue and read to issue 18.
Matt Scroggins
It's hard to read this book and not feel emotions and those emotions might be loathing that inspire one to write a scathing review and slap a single star next to it.
E. David Swan
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By K. Kanitz on December 31, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
There's some pretty neat stuff in this conclusion to Grant Morrison's run. He somehow makes the Phantom Zone even more awful than it's been in the past. He gives Superman a dog that is tough as nails, and in a way that makes perfect sense. He manages to give us 5th dimensional characters that are engaging and (dare I say it?) realistic.

Yet for all of that, there are flaws. I wasn't put off by Grant's mashing of past, present and future--in the context of this story, it makes perfect sense and wasn't hard to follow. But (and it's a HUGE but) the method of defeating the main villain comes out of left field without any real justification as to how or why it works (other than 'it's impossible'). Further, it is claimed that Superman's father accomplished the same impossible victory decades earlier, but (other than providing hope for success in the present) this bit of knowledge contributes nothing to Superman's flash of insight that saves the day. I know that good story telling is 'show, don't tell" but I could have used a little more 'tell'. Sadly, this volume contains no endnotes from the author, which proved very enlightening in the Bat books that he wrote.

In short: great ideas with flawed execution.
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9 of 12 people found the following review helpful By E. David Swan VINE VOICE on December 19, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Grant Morrison's time writing Action Comics has come to a close and what a close it is. I was skeptical if he'd be able to wrap up all the disparate plot threads he'd developed in the first two volumes but he does. In fact Morrison's gathers up a whole pile of ideas, tosses them in a blender and pours them out onto the pages of Action Comics. Is it a success? I wouldn't be giving this volume 3 stars if it were. I gave volume 2 four stars while it averages 3 stars on Amazon so it seemed to resonate with me more than the average reader and I enjoyed the first volume which I did not review. Here is where things really go insane. The villain is an escapee from Phantom Zone. I mean it's a trio of colored villains as in one is green, one is red and the other is blue. Actually the villain is a super Doomsday. No, it's a group of sentient construction equipment called Me-Ta-Lek, I mean a hoard of angel looking creators called the Multitude or perhaps an ultra-powerful 5th dimensional being.

I assume what Morrison was trying to do was write a 5th dimensional story to go with the 5th dimensional villain which meant the story is all over the place. It moves forward in time, backwards in time, sidewise in time often from one panel to the next. The biggest complaint of volumes one and two were how difficult the stories were to read but volume 3 is EASILY the hardest. The character dialogue is completely unnatural and things just happen all over the place as if the story were taking place in a violent dust storm. I have a Morrison scale of his more famous DC storylines with All-Star Superman being the peak and Final Crisis being the depth. I would put this much closer to Crisis than All-Star.

So why am I giving it a three rather than a one or two?
Read more ›
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Bruno A. Magistris on January 3, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I don't know why I expect something other than excellence with an author like Grant Morrison. I have lots of friends that only having read the first issues of this book, said that it was't very interesting and also that it was bad.
And I always repeat the same: with Morrison, you have to wait till the end.
When he starts a story, whatever it is, he has it all planned on his head. And it won't pay out till the very last issue.
This is not a book for everybody. It demands a certain level of concentration that, I think, only maybe Alan Moore can acomplish too.
To wrap it up: buy the three volumes, read them carefully, and think if it's not a great story.
If you do think that it's bad, then keep buying your Geoff Jones books...
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Matt Scroggins on December 27, 2013
Format: Hardcover
Look I'm a fan and generally like what Grant Morrison puts out. I didn't read this in trade I was reading it as it came out monthly. When I finished reading it at the last issues release I sat down the next week and started with (the equivalent in trade) Volume 1 first issue and read to issue 18. Here's what I can say from the experience: It's a very tightly plotted story with a payoff that was at least roughly planned out from the start. It does get confusing but that is also a result of dealing with a villain that is basically incomprehensible to us from a sensory and physical perspective. Time is looked at from the perspective of someone living outside of time's arrow and a lot of the time travel elements in this ( the villains gathering together to beat him at the end) are set up in the first two volumes and this is basically the pay off. It's not going to be for everyone but if you like dynamic superhero stories that require a bit of thought but no less fun or entertainment then I think you will enjoy this book.
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Format: Kindle Edition
If you like more or less linear storytelling, you won't be happy with this. The narrative constantly jumped around from page to page and even from panel to panel. Perhaps it was too avant garde for me, or perhaps it was just a confusing mess.
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