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Superman III Paperback – July 7, 1983


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Arrow Books Ltd; Special Edition edition (July 7, 1983)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0446307009
  • ISBN-13: 978-0099320906
  • ASIN: 0099320908
  • Product Dimensions: 6.8 x 4.2 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,170,710 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Hound Dog on July 22, 2011
Format: Hardcover
In the summer of 1983, as you may know, the lackluster film "Superman III" starring Christopher Reeve as the legendary Man of Steel and Richard Pryor as bumbling computer genius Gus Gorman signaled the premature end of the mighty "Superman" movie franchise. Considering the mostly horrendous script, it is particularly telling that neither Reeve nor Pryor scored another box office hit after this film crashed at movie theaters. Yet, on the off-chance that you should come across author William Kotzwinkle's novelization of "Superman III, it proves to be an amusingly ironic and pleasant surprise.

The framework of the finalized film is all here (unfortunately, I suppose), but Kotzwinkle does a mighty fine job enhancing and adding significant details to the scenes between the movie scenes. Case in point: utilizing a cynical point-of-view, Kotzwinkle makes it abundantly clear that Clark Kent-Superman is getting burnt out on super-heroics and ordinary human life, which makes his susceptibility to tar-flavored kryptonite (and a newly discovered evil side) far more plausible. But what makes Kotzwinkle's writing so much fun is the multiple points-of-view or thought balloons he can express for Clark, Superman, Gus, Lana, Ross Webster, or even Brad by making them seem wonderfully real and, yes, delightfully cynical.

An example would be Gus standing next to chilly Vera during his first meeting with the Websters to conjure up their first major scheme, and why he veers away from her "because her breath could bring down a B-52." Or sensing that Webster is toying with the idea of sending him back to prison for embezzlement, a sweating Gus could "already taste the special flavor of those prison beans.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Blue Tyson on August 5, 2007
Format: Paperback
This is more like an episode of the sixties Batman. Superman throughout this is distracted and distant, exacerbated when he gets a small dose of green kryptonite which turns him into a wanker.

Gus Gorman, Ross the Boss and his sister are pretty ludicrous.

For 158 pages, this book has ellipsis overload, and Kotzwinkle looks like he is deliberately throwing in a lot of bizarre, bad lines because he was annoyed.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Peter Sorenson on November 28, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I purchased my very first copy of this novel when I was only 9 years old, during the summer of 1983, when the movie 'Superman III' was in theaters. One thing I've noticed about the novel versions of movies, they often include a lot of 'background' or 'filler' information that is often not included in the movie. Such is the case with this novel. Nice photographic insert in the middle of the book, too. In order to replace the long misplaced copy of this novel that I bought back in 1983, I bought this new copy - and I'm only glad I did! I have no regrets about having bought it!
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Format: Paperback
In the summer of 1983, as you may know, the lackluster film "Superman III" starring Christopher Reeve as the legendary Man of Steel and Richard Pryor as bumbling computer genius Gus Gorman signaled the premature end of the mighty "Superman" movie franchise. Considering the mostly horrendous script, it is particularly telling that neither Reeve nor Pryor scored another box office hit after this film crashed at movie theaters. Yet, on the off-chance that you should come across author William Kotzwinkle's novelization of "Superman III, it proves to be an amusingly ironic and pleasant surprise.

The framework of the finalized film is all here (unfortunately, I suppose), but Kotzwinkle does a mighty fine job enhancing and adding significant details to the scenes between the movie scenes. Case in point: utilizing a cynical point-of-view, Kotzwinkle makes it abundantly clear that Clark Kent-Superman is getting burnt out on super-heroics and ordinary human life, which makes his susceptibility to tar-flavored kryptonite (and a newly discovered evil side) far more plausible. But what makes Kotzwinkle's writing so much fun is the multiple points-of-view or thought balloons he can express for Clark, Superman, Gus, Lana, Ross Webster, or even Brad by making them seem wonderfully real and, yes, delightfully cynical.

An example would be Gus standing next to chilly Vera during his first meeting with the Websters to conjure up their first major scheme, and why he veers away from her "because her breath could bring down a B-52." Or sensing that Webster is toying with the idea of sending him back to prison for embezzlement, a sweating Gus could "already taste the special flavor of those prison beans.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Hound Dog on July 22, 2011
Format: Paperback
In the summer of 1983, as you may know, the lackluster film "Superman III" starring Christopher Reeve as the legendary Man of Steel and Richard Pryor as bumbling computer genius Gus Gorman signaled the premature end of the mighty "Superman" movie franchise. Considering the mostly horrendous script, it is particularly telling that neither Reeve nor Pryor scored another box office hit after this film crashed at movie theaters. Yet, on the off-chance that you should come across author William Kotzwinkle's novelization of "Superman III, it proves to be an amusingly ironic and pleasant surprise.

The framework of the finalized film is all here (unfortunately, I suppose), but Kotzwinkle does a mighty fine job enhancing and adding significant details to the scenes between the movie scenes. Case in point: utilizing a cynical point-of-view, Kotzwinkle makes it abundantly clear that Clark Kent-Superman is getting burnt out on super-heroics and ordinary human life, which makes his susceptibility to tar-flavored kryptonite (and a newly discovered evil side) far more plausible. But what makes Kotzwinkle's writing so much fun is the multiple points-of-view or thought balloons he can express for Clark, Superman, Gus, Lana, Ross Webster, or even Brad by making them seem wonderfully real and, yes, delightfully cynical.

An example would be Gus standing next to chilly Vera during his first meeting with the Websters to conjure up their first major scheme, and why he veers away from her "because her breath could bring down a B-52." Or sensing that Webster is toying with the idea of sending him back to prison for embezzlement, a sweating Gus could "already taste the special flavor of those prison beans.
Read more ›
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More About the Author

American novelist William Kotzwinkle is a two-time recipient of the National Magazine Award for Fiction, a Book Critics Circle award nominee, a winner of the World Fantasy Award, the Prix Litteraire des Bouquinistes des Quais de Paris, the PETA Award for Children's Fiction, and he wrote the narration for Michael Jackson's E.T. record which won a special children's Grammy.