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Superman in the Seventies Paperback – November 1, 2000


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Product Details

  • Series: Superman in the
  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: DC Comics (November 1, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1563896389
  • ISBN-13: 978-1563896385
  • Product Dimensions: 10.2 x 6.6 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.9 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #875,519 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By "kokokay" on February 23, 2002
Format: Paperback
As I've mentioned in my review for "Batman in the 70s", the problem faced by all such compilations is that everyone will have an opinion of what other stories should be included and what should have been left out. I feel that this is a decent collection of Superman stories in the 70s, as all the key artists and characters are represented here. The TPB contains classics like "Superman Breaks Free" which is Dennis O'Neil's attempt at revamping the Superman; Elloit S! Maggin's classic "Must there be a Superman?", somewhat overhyped but still an interesting story; a Jimmy Olsen story by Jack 'King' Kirby; a story about Krypto; and other stories featuring Lex Luthor, Brainiac etc. Of course, it would have been even better if the TPB collects more stories about the Fortress of Solitude, bottled city of Kandor etc.
Some shortcomings of this collection: It would probably have been more fun to read some of the stories in the entire run (like Marvel Essentials) than on a single-issue basis as they are presented in this TPB. E.g. "Superman breaks free" is actually the first book of O'Neil's Sandman saga; the Jimmy Olsen story is the first of around 20 (?) issues which Kirby wrote. It is a shame that DC has decided not to reprint these classic runs anywhere, since it will cost a bomb for anyone to try to collect the original copies of these comics. Another omission that everyone complains is the story arc in Superman #296-299 "Who took the Super out of Superman?"
In spite of all the shortcomings, I feel that this collection will give the reader a good sampling of pre-crisis superman stories. There are many classic moments in this TPB: Superman eating Kryptonite (!); Superman playing billards with planets; plus time-travel, aliens, inter-galactic travel all thrown in for good measure.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 13, 2001
Format: Paperback
I thought the reviews for this book were harsh. Then I got the book. They're right on the money. I grew up reading the Superman of the 1970s. These are the stories that shaped my viewpoints of Superman, but this book is wanting. None of the great Superman chronicles I remember are here. "The Double or Nothing Life of Superman" is a series I just purchased on eBay. It should be included in this volume. I also recall an outstanding, well-written series in which, among other things, the Bottled City of Kandor was smashed, as Superman again had issues with his Kryptonian past. And the greatest Superman story of the 1970s, "Superman Vs. Spider-Man," while mentioned, is woefully missing. The Superman of the 1970s brought about characters like Steve Lombard, Morgan Edge, and a few others, who participated in some great tales. You'll find the characters here, but not the good stories. Really, save your money on this book. Go to eBay and try and win some of the actual issues themselves from the 1970s.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Sean Pyburn on January 3, 2001
Format: Paperback
This collection of 14 of the best Superman stories from his many comic appearances in the 70's was a little diappointing. After reading and thoroughly enjoying the Superman in the Sixties Collection, I was looking forward with great anticipation to picking up and reading this follow up. Unfortunately, these stories (with a few exceptions) seemed bland and were not as enjoyable as other Superman stories I have read. If you are a Superman fan this collection is good read and will be enjoyed, but if you are a casual reader spend your money and time on the Superman in the Sixties Collection and pass on this one.
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6 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Babytoxie on July 19, 2005
Format: Paperback
I never paid much attention to Superman before Crisis on Infinite Earths. In my earlier years, I preferred the more humanized heroes from Marvel to the world-recognized icons from DC. Lately, I've been reading DC's Superman "decade collections" in order to find out more about the history of the Man of Steel. SUPERMAN IN THE SEVENTIES can best be described as a good, if somewhat overwhelming, choice.

This book is proof that, after more than 3 decades of almost no editorial restraint, Superman was approaching omnipotence. I really feel for the various writers whose work is represented in this book, as I'm sure it would be very difficult to write a character that has no limits. While I am not that big of a fan of the changes that resulted from COIE, SUPERMAN IN THE SEVENTIES convinces me that, in the case of Superman at least, the "big wipe" was necessary. The stories presented here show a Superman who is stuck in a loop, a never-ending display of increasingly unlimited powers: when you have a hero who can get himself out of any seemingly hopeless situation, you have to have villains who can make the next situation seem even MORE hopeless. Then, of course, the hero must come up with yet another amazing solution to that more hopeless situation, and on and on. Eventually, this leads to implausibility and outright ridiculousness (yes, even for a comic!). By the time I finished this collection, I knew exactly what the editors and writers at DC were thinking when they decided to pull the curtain in the mid-`80s.

Don't get me wrong: I don't hate the stories collected in SUPERMAN IN THE SEVENTIES. In fact, I enjoyed this book very much. The stories are both grandiose and crazy.
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