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58 of 59 people found the following review helpful
on May 9, 2009
After a decade of experience as the parent of an ADHD child, I feel that Superparenting for ADD is the first book that parents new to ADHD should read. It offers valuable strategies to help your child reach his/her full potential. I wish it had been available when I was first learning about ADHD.

As a professional educator, I think this book should be at the top of the reading list for both parents and teachers that have and know children with ADHD. It offers valuable strategies to help in the day-to-day challenges of raising and teaching the ADHD child.

In addition to the message of Unconditional Love and other important themes in this book for raising a distracted child, Superparenting offers in Chapter 9, concise and valuable information about treating ADD: Changes in Lifestyle (Sleep, Diet, Exercise and Positive Human Contact), providing Structure, Counseling, and Medication. Appendix A offers equally valuable information on using Behavioral Strategies to help your child improve his or her behavior. These two sections alone justify the purchase of this book.

In addition to this and Dr. Hallowell's other fine books, you should consider looking at books written by Thomas E. Brown and Russell A. Barkley. Hallowell, Brown and Barkley each have websites with informative articles for parents, teachers and others.

Please note that while Hallowell prefers the term ADD over ADHD, but this book is really Superparenting for ADHD.
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46 of 49 people found the following review helpful
on January 4, 2009
Both fathers of ADD children themselves, Dr. Hallowell & Dr. Jenson, do an excellent service here reminding us parents to stay focused on the most important factor of all in raising any child (with or without ADHD) ... Unconditional Love.

This book is upbeat, positive and easy reading. It helps you deal with all the parenting challenges you face at school and at home while raising a child with ADD. But more importantly it helps you see the gifts of these children in a much brighter light.

The practical strength-based techniques they give you in this book show you how to put the talents, charms, and positive essence of your child ahead of any shortcomings associated with ADD.

This book is clearly outlined and organized and gives you a specific game plan that includes:

* UNCONDITIONAL LOVE Tune out the diagnosticians and labelers and simply notice and nourish the spirit of your child for who he is. Providing this unshakable base of support will set the tone for all interactions to come.

* VIEWING THE MIRROR TRAITS There are positive sides of the negative symptoms associated with ADD: stubbornness = persistence; impulsiveness = creativity; intrusiveness = eagerness. By recognizing the mirror traits, you avoid the ravages of shame and fear.

* THE CYCLE OF EXCELLENCE Use this critical 5-step process to help a child develop self- and social awareness. Nurture an environment in which a child can safely take risks, reserve time to let a child dabble as a way to learn, encourage playful practice, support mastery of a skill (whatever the skill may be), and then recognize a child's accomplishments.

* IDENTIFYING AND TAPPING THE SOURCE Pinpoint your child's inner, conative strengths, which drive what he naturally and spontaneously does, as opposed to what he is told to do or feels he must do. Your child will do his best when allowed to use these conative strengths.

If you're the parent of a child with ADD or ADHD you should definitely check out this practical step-by-step advice. May it help you transform what is too often labeled a "lifelong disability" into a "lifelong blessing."
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20 of 22 people found the following review helpful
on November 27, 2012
I must admit that I have not finished reading the book, yet. I have been reading, very slowly, actually. I got it with the hope that it would tell me what to "do" about my son. And, while it is giving me some "to dos", it is much more than that. So, I am savoring it. This book, for me, is not just a "how to". It is a call to parent with more consciousness, heart, and connection. Something that would be good for all parents of all kinds of children. It is challenging me to stop trying to "manage" my son, so he fits better into my fast-moving flow of life. It is challenging me to slow down and really see him, listen to him, learn what gifts he brings to the table, and what can I learn from him and this parenting journey. None of that is to say that it denies the frustrating, frightening, and sad parts of parenting a child with ADD. This is fully acknowledged in the book. I often feel like the writers have been looking into my window! I feel empathized with and appreciated and encouraged when I read the book. Shifting from seeing this diagnosis as only something to "get over" or "push through", to something that we will both be living with and learning to incorporate into how we live our lives together, is a major shift for me. I am more hopeful, even in the midst of the maddening aspects of parenting. I am learning to be a much better advocate for my son with others. I have more respect for him, and that allows me to parent him from a much more loving place than a judgmental place. Get this book, it is a breath of fresh air!
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
on July 7, 2014
When I first began reading books on parenting an ADD child I immediately latched on to Dr. Hallowell's upbeat positive spin on ADD. However, my journey with my own son eventually led me to the work of Dr. Robert Melillo who wrote "Disconnected Kids". The two doctors are at opposite ends of the spectrum on the ADD issue, the former being of the "different is o.k." philosophy and the later seeing ADD has a reversible imbalance between stronger and weaker hemisphere's of the brain. Dr. Hallowell rightly identifies that ADD children have remarkable strengths and urges parents to focus on developing those strengths, which according to Dr. Melillo are coming from the stronger hemisphere. The trouble I have with Hallowell's approach is that ADD is presented as a normal variation of the brain that should be celebrated because it can not be changed. Melillo, on the other hand, acknowledges that neurological disorders such as ADD are just that, disorders of the brain (non pathological) that can and should be remedied as soon as possible. What joyful hopeful news. I put this book away and enrolled my son in Dr. Melillo's Brain Balance Therapy and my son is on his way to a drug-free, non ADD, life. (On a side note, according to Melillo "accentuating the positive", or "unwrapping the gifts of ADD" as Hallowell characterizes it, is the last thing you want to do because it further opens the gap between the hemispheres. Read "Disconnected Kids" for more information). I have nothing against Hallowell, he seems like a great guy. But I see Melillo on the cutting edge of "curing" neurological disorders such as ADD and Hallowell as maintaining the status quo. I have chosen to follow Melillo and leap for joy when my friends tell me of my son: "this is a different kid!" Melillo has also written a book on autism.
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32 of 40 people found the following review helpful
on October 18, 2010
While the authors are upbeat and encouraging, they are pushing an online evaluation tool to identify your child's strengths. Nice idea, but it costs $ for another report about your child, and very little guidance on how to use it. You have to trust that the report will give you the advice you're seeking, and didn't find in the book.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
I bought the CD of this book and truly enjoyed it. I passed it along to my daughter - the mother of our loved ADD child. The message of the book is to love and treasure your child and see his/her positives. That is good with any child, of course, but it is a reminder for parents of a child who is a little more challenging. This book helps to point out some special positives of the ADD child.

The narrator of the CD is absolutely perfect. He had a sympathetic voice, but not syrupy. He made it very enjoyable to listen to the CD while I drove.

I listened to the book a few times before passing it on, but I could easily listen many more times. I think I'm more cognizant of the pluses of ADD now and have changed my language a bit when talking with my grandson.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on March 21, 2013
If you have read Driven to Distraction, which I LOVE then you have also read much of what is in this book. I was not nearly as impressed with Superparenting in regards to giving real life tips/tools on raising a child with ADD. I was looking for information on how to interact with my child, discipline my child, and assist my child staying on task but did not get any of what I was looking for. Probably OK to skip this one.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on May 8, 2012
After reading "Superparenting for ADD" by Edward M. Hallowell, MD and Peter S. Jensen, MD, I feel empowered! I know that I am doing the right thing by loving my children regardless of labels and diagnoses. This book covers all of the practical apects of raising a child with ADD. This book gives parents all of the arguments against the horror stories about how our ADD children will grow up to be failures! This book offers a bright start for the future.

After reading some of the previous reviews, I feel that I must add that the authors say at the beginning of the book that it is not one about hashing out the treatment of ADD. This book was intended to offer support to those of us who worry that we aren't doing enough or doing the right thing. If you are looking for something more technical, check out the authors other books.
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16 of 20 people found the following review helpful
on November 17, 2011
This book, whatever its practical or emotional usefulness to parents, needed to be cut to about half its length (but then I guess the price would have to come down, eh?). At some point, I stopped reading and started skimming. Then, I stopped skimming and gave up. Too many anecdotes. Too many promises of help before the alleged help comes. Too much repetition and redundancy.

Kids with ADHD have Ferrari brains and Volkswagon breaks -- there, you just read half the book.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on March 31, 2009
I really enjoyed the book. Sometimes it is nice to learn you are not alone in feeling the way you do. I found out through reading the book that I really understand my son and that all the loving I give my son is never too much. I advocate for my son always, an it is ok, I am not spoiling him, I am supporting him.
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