Qty:1
  • List Price: $32.00
  • Save: $3.20 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: While this book has been loved by someone else, they left it in great condition. Hurry and buy it before someone else does and take advantage of our FREE Super Saver Shipping!!! (there is a chance this book could contain a gift inscription)
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Superstitious Hardcover – September 14, 1995


See all 15 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$28.80
$1.49 $0.01
Paperback, Import
"Please retry"
$1.91
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$8.60
Best%20Books%20of%202014


Frequently Bought Together

Superstitious + Red Rain: A Novel
Price for both: $36.79

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Grand Central Publishing; First Edition edition (September 14, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0446519537
  • ISBN-13: 978-0446519533
  • Product Dimensions: 6.2 x 9.2 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (91 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #844,537 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Stine has written 56 YA novels and one adult novel, all horror. Readers will recognize this as the adult novel because it's hardcover and several characters in it curse, enjoy X-rated sex and die gruesomely detailed deaths. Otherwise, this simple, sturdy story of occult mayhem on a bucolic college campus features the sort of crude yet functional casting, plotting and prose that have made Stine America's bestselling YA author: characters verge on caricature, for easy identification; stormy nights and cliff-hangers abound; and no-frills prose, arranged in short sentences and paragraphs for speed reading, tells the tale ("The fingers stab deep. Her eyeballs make a soft plop plop as they are pried out"). Even those with minimal attention spans will keep turning pages as grad student Sara Morgan meets and marries hunky prof Liam Morgan. So what if Liam has a murky past, lives with his sister and takes his field?Irish folklore?so seriously that he throws salt over his shoulder for good luck and cringes in terror when a black cat jumps on his lap? Does that mean he's involved in the brutal mutilation-murders that are plaguing Moore State? Stine shakes a finger at two other suspects but doesn't reveal the reason for the bloodletting until novel's end. And that's just as well since, like the rest of this story, the underlying premise is about as sophisticated, though as effective, as jumping out from a dark corner and yelling "boo!" Major ad/promo; film rights to Miramax (Brandon Tartikoff, producer); Time/Warner audio due in October; author tour.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From School Library Journal

YA?In his first adult book, Stine continues his page-turning incorporation of horror, the supernatural, and a naive heroine. Short sentences and a relatively simple plot will capture the attention of YAs in this tale of love (or is it self-centered delight in apparent adoration and sexual gratification?) before the horror takes over. Sara Morgan, fleeing an abusive relationship, returns to Moore State College for a masters in psychology. Swept off her feet by Liam O'Connor, a glamorous and brilliant visiting professor of folklore, she soon becomes his devoted wife. She views her husband's adherence to supersititon fondly at first, but gradually finds it wearing and extreme. Liam tells her his behavior keeps the demons at bay. In fact, their first argument involves supersitition, as does the shocking circumstance of their final estrangement. The book is a long way from "Fear Street" (Pocket), and sure to be as popular.?Barbara Hawkins, Oakton High School, Fairfax, VA
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.

More About the Author

Why is Tim Jacobus R.L. Stine's favorite illustrator? Maybe because they've done so many scary books together. Tim did the cover paintings for more than 80 Goosebumps books, as well as the six amazing Amazon books. Recently, the two of them got together and asked the questions they've always wanted to ask each other...

~~~~

TIM (the illustrator) asks R.L. STINE (the author):

TIM: When I illustrate, I can "see" the image in my head before I start to draw. Do you "hear" a story when you write?

R.L.: I hear kids when I write. I try to hear the voice of the boy or girl who is telling the story. I visit schools a lot and talk with kids so I can keep up with what they are saying these days and what real kids sound like. Then I try to hear their voices tell the story as I write it.

~

TIM: You've written so many books I can't do the math, but I bet you've used millions of words. What's you favorite word?

R.L.: Someone once got in an elevator with a very witty author named Noel Coward and said, "Say something funny." And Coward said, "Kangaroo." Kangaroo has been a favorite word of mine ever since I heard that story. But as a horror writer, I guess my favorite word is SCREAM!

~

TIM: Where is the strangest place you have come up with an idea for a story?

R.L.: An empty movie theater. My wife and I went to see a scary movie in a big, old movie house-- and we were the only ones in the theater. It was kind of creepy. Then about halfway through the movie, I turned around and saw that the back row was filled with people sitting straight and still. Suddenly, I thought-- They are zombies! I'm trapped in a dark zombie theater! And that's where the idea for the book Zombie Town came from.

~

TIM: If you couldn't write-- and you possessed all skills-- what would you like to do for a living?

R.L.: I drew comic strips from the time I was in 4th grade, and I always dreamed of being a cartoonist. You can imagine my shock when the other kids told me how bad my art was. They were right. I stunk! I got over my extreme disappointment by starting to write. But if I had the skill, I would love to do what you do, Tim.

**********

R.L. STINE (the author)asks TIM (the illustrator):

R.L.: If you couldn't be an artist what would you like to be?

TIM: I would like to be a "Snowmaker" at one of the big ski resorts, out west, like Mammoth Mountain in California. You work at night when everyone goes home. Set up the snow guns, cover the slopes, and groom them with the Sno-Cat track machine. It's kinda like a snow tank! Then, you get to ski for free! I love that snow!

~

R.L.: When we were kids, my brother and I used to go to a horror movie every Saturday. We loved them all. The covers on our six Amazon books look like movie posters to me. Were you also influenced by horror movies? If so, which ones?

TIM: I was a complete "chicken" as a kid. I couldn't sit through any horror movie. The first scary movie I saw was on TV. It isn't really a horror movie. It was the Hunchback of Notre Dame-- the black-and-white version with Charles Laughton. That movie freaked me out! The mutant, Quasimodo, was something that REALLY could exist. Black-and-white movies, black-and-white photos--they all seem more "real" than full color to me.

~

R.L.: You have painted so many great covers. I think your scariest Goosebumps cover was for The Barking Ghost. And the black cat on The 13th Warning is really creepy. Do you have a favorite cover? Is it a scary one or a funny one?

TIM: It's hard to pick a favorite. But you gotta love the blue bathroom blobs in Monster Blood IV. That one is a little creepy and WAY funny. For just outright scary, I love the ticket taker in Zombie Town!

~

R.L.: What was the weirdest thing someone ever asked you to draw?

TIM: Oh, I have drawn a lot of weird stuff. One time, I had to paint a pimple! You know... acne! It was a medical illustration. Gross. When I first started illustrating, I painted pictures of food. My food illustrations were used in the Sunday newspaper for the local supermarket. I painted every food you can imagine. I can draw a pretty mean potato!

Customer Reviews

I'm not entirely sure why I finished the book.
Occasional shopper
I have been an R.L. Stine fan since I could first read I actually think I read all of this books but the newer ones.
cassidrm
I didn't connect with any of the characters, and the plot left too many gaping holes.
T. Steffes

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By CANDACE on January 7, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I was very reluctant when I saw R.L.Stine was the author of "SUPERSTITIOUS" because he was reknowned as a mainly children's book writer. When I first read the book and got past the first chapter I was immediately captivated and couldn't put it down. I would rush home form school just to read it and it put me in some kind-of trance which I was in a alternate world and was living Sara's life. It sent chills down my spine and made me re-examine my life to the superstition rules... I really liked the book and reccommend it to all.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 2, 2002
Format: Mass Market Paperback
As a former fan of his YA books, I felt compelled to try this book when it first came out.
This book is a huge dissapointment.
SUPERSTITIOUS follows several people all in a small college town who are connected to each other through the college and through the brutal murders that have just started. There's Sara Morgan, a grad student who marries prestigious prof. Liam O'Connor, and Garrett Montgomery, the detective investigating the murders, for the main characters. Along with them is a handful of other characters, most of whom are unimportant--they are introduced briefly the sole purpose of being killed off later in the book.
First, the plot. The main ideas around which the book was constructed were generally a good ones, but the plot wasn't expanded very well or explored to the fullest--it was lousy. Along with several unimportant characters, Stine killed the plot's potential. Stine seemed to be taking the easy road out on this one.
The charachters were not very well developed. Most people in this book seem to be in their twenties, and no character is very realistic. Stine tried too hard to get into the mind frame of this age group--it's somewhat obvious when reading the charachter's thoughts and dialogue; he doesn't do a very good job. The characters also do not reach their full potential--when given an option of doing two things, they'll pick the less interesting one--sort of an easy way out. The dialogue was not too bad, but not without its flaws. Stine also tried to incorporate adult themes into the novel (sex), and while these scenes could have also been much better, they were extremely bad. I don't mean this in the raunchy sense, either--Stine is neither Marquis de Sade nor Brett Easton Ellis. The sex scenes are very badly written, and essentially all the same.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By T. Steffes on August 11, 2007
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Maybe I opened this book with too high of expectations. I love the Fear Street series, have since I was a kid. I may have a BA in English, bu I still love to read these during TV comerials and smoke breaks. Anyways, to make a too long story short, I HATED this book. I didn't connect with any of the characters, and the plot left too many gaping holes. Also, while trying to please "adults" Stine left all of his charm on the cutting room floor. I only spent .50 on this at a garage sale, yet I still feel I was ripped off. The only reason I gave this terrible book 2 stars is beacause the idea was original, and I still love the Fear St. books.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 28, 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Not having read Stine's teen books, I was looking forward to this book as a good read for Halloween. It wasn't. The plotting and writing were like a first draft. A lot of it didn't make sense. I gave it one star only because the sex scenes were (unintentionally) very funny.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By LSNelson on January 26, 2014
Format: Hardcover
SPOILERS!
Absolutely, without doubt, the worst book ever! My family spent many hilarious evenings listening to my adult son read this novel aloud, using different voices for the characters. We expected it to be bad, but we never imagined just how bad! Now, R. L. Stine is popular for his children’s and young adult series, no debate on that. But, it doesn’t make him a “good” writer, just a bestselling one. This book was like a Goosebumps with “bad” words, ridiculous sex scenes, and over-the-top murders thrown in as an effort to appeal to the adult reader.
This isn’t a horror novel, so much as a spoof of a horror novel. Unfortunately for Stine, it was meant to be a serious novel.

Some of the funniest, and/or confusing segments?

1) “Her eyeballs make a soft plop plop as they are pried out… She sees only red.” pg. 7 Really? She sees red?
2) Garrett, the police officer. “I’m not a real cop… I’m a campus cop.” “Let’s all pretend we’re cops!” pg. 32, 150 Yet, later in the book, he is referred to as “detective” and even later, “chief.” It’s page 272 by the time the actual police are called in. They are described both as State Police and “the feds.” This is after four murders have occurred.
3) The police photographer is a high school student. pg. 201
4) Garrett and his albino cop-sidekick (yes, albino) leave the office, “Into a cool, wet night. They didn’t need their jackets.” Come again?
5) On a similar note, Sara visits her mother, who says, “You’re freezing! Take off your coat.” pg. 217
6) Sara is leaving Mary Beth’s, where she had spent the evening and had dinner. Mary Beth says, “We could order a pizza.” To which Sara responds, “No. Really. I’m not hungry. Thanks for dinner, Mary Beth. It was great.” pg.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By rzaster on September 4, 2002
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is popular author R.L. Stine's debut in the adult fiction world as he is most famous for his "Goosebumps" and "Fear Street" series, which are both aimed at kids and teenagers. As with Stine's previous works, he is not a master of the craft with intricate plots, great characters, and development. Stine writes novels that are mostly plot driven, leaving out a lot of character development and details. This is great for a reader that is not looking for the latter but readers that do enjoy this stuff should seek entertainment with a different book.
Sara Morgan is a woman that lives in a college town and is seeking work, so she takes a job with the dean of students at the university. She then starts seeing a professor at the school, Liam, an Irish born guy that believes in superstitions. Meanwhile, there are many gruesome, terrible murders taking place in the town and an investigation is started. This novel takes you into the affair of Sara and Liam and parts of the investigation.
If you are looking for a thriller that is very involved with the police investagations then this book is not for you. As far as Stine gets with the police stuff is taking you to the scene of the crime and describing lots of gore. Stine's writing is very easy to read though it does come off as very childish at times. This is an easy book to zip right through because of this, but for readers looking for entwined and detailed writing should look somewhere else.
One of the problems I had with the book was the lack of depth. Everything in the book was presented very quickly and Stine never dug deep enough to make the reader feel involved with the story on an emotional level.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?